Why Did The Venetians Consider Themselves Blessed By Saint Mark

Venetian Cat – The Venice Blog

While your stories demonstrate that St. Anthony can locate almost everything, we have found that he appears to be particularly adept at locating your misplaced diamonds and wedding bands. It became clear that there were enough of these anecdotes to warrant a separate blog post. For further information, please see this link: Why St. Anthony should be officially designated as the patron saint of lost diamond rings, as well as your own personal experiences. Interested in sharing your experience?

During World War II, the 25th of April is observed as a national holiday in Italy to commemorate the liberation of the country from Nazi and Fascist rule in 1945, similar to the 4th of July in the United States.

San Marco is the patron saint of Venice, and for centuries, even before the Italian Liberation Day, Venetians celebrated the 25th of April in a unique and spectacular style that was unmatched anywhere else in the world.

This year (2012) also marked the 100th anniversary of the reconstruction of the Campanile, Saint Mark’s bell tower, which had collapsed in 1902.

(Or so the tale goes.) In this context, April 25th is a very important day in Venice, a day to fly the flag, which is emblazoned with the winged lion of San Marco, to receive uber blessings, to commemorate the Campanile, and for men to express their affection for the women in their lives, whether they are their wives or girlfriends, mothers, daughters, or friends.

  1. Prior to Mark, Theodore was venerated as Venice’s patron saint.
  2. They were in desperate need of an evangelist.
  3. Hicrequiescet corpus tuum, oh my soul.” (May Peace be with you, Mark, my evangelist.
  4. After all, there were just four evangelists – Mark, Matthew, Luke and John, and they had authored the gospels, which many of us still read today:) Alexandria was the site of the church’s founding by Mark.
  5. Mark was martyred in 68AD when the pagans, enraged by his efforts to convert them away from their gods, tied a rope around his neck and carried him through the streets till he died.
  6. All that remained was one problem: Mark had been buried in Egypt.
  7. At the time, the Doge was Giustiniano Participazio, and he was enacting significant reforms in the city.
  8. The expedition’s accomplishment elevated the city’s standing in the eyes of the public.

Tradition has it that Saint Mark himself was the first to evangelize Venice, and many Venetians made the journey to Mark’s tomb in Alexandria, Egypt, to commemorate the occasion.

Similar to the 4th of July in the United States, the 25th of April is observed as a national holiday in Italy to commemorate the country’s liberation from Nazi and Fascist rule during World War II during 1945. Saint Mark’s Day falls on this day as well. In honor of St. Mark’s Square, the patron saint of Venice, Venetians have celebrated April 25th in a unique and spectacular manner for centuries, well before Italian Liberation Day. The day is also known as “The Day of the Blooming Rose,” when men express their affection for their female partners by giving them a bouquet of fresh flowers.

  1. The Campanile was reopened “as it was, where it was” on April 25, 1912, exactly a thousand years to the day after its original foundations were laid on April 25, 912.
  2. Before Hollywood existed, there was Venice, and Venice has always been a master at bringing tales to life on the big screen.
  3. When Venice sought independence from Byzantium in the ninth century, they determined that they needed a more powerful saint to help them achieve their goal.
  4. In fact, there is a tale of Saint Mark going through the Venetian lagoon on his route from Aquilea to Rome when an angel came to him and proclaimed, “St Mark, mark me when you pass through this lagoon.” “My name is Marce, and I am a priest of the Lord Jesus Christ.
  5. St.
  6. Theodore when it came to the saints.
  7. Mark was recognized as the one who was responsible for bringing Christianity to Africa.
  8. All that remained was the matter of Mark’s burial place in Egypt.
  9. It was the reign of Giustiniano Participazio, who was enacting significant reforms in the city.
  10. The expedition’s accomplishment elevated the city’s standing in the world.

As tradition has it, Saint Mark himself was the first to evangelize Venice, and many Venetians traveled to Alexandria, Egypt, to pay their respects to the saint’s tomb.

That brief experience sparked a worldwide craze of saint-stealing across Europe, but that is an another story altogether. What was done, on the other hand, was that Venice’s international standing was significantly enhanced. Mark the Evangelist became the patron saint, and his emblem, the winged lion became the symbol of Venice. Venice soon gained possession of the Patriarchate as well, leaving Aquilea and Grado in the dust of history. There are currently just four Patriarchs of the Latin Rite on the entire earth, and they are located in Jerusalem, Lisbon, the East Indies, and Venice, respectively.

  • Pope John Paul I, who died unexpectedly after 33 days on the throne of the Holy See, was the last Venetian Patriarch to rise to the throne of the Holy See.
  • Today’s Patriarch, Francesco Moraglia, bears the same coat of arms as Pope Pius X, who served as both Patriarch of Venice and Pope Pius XII throughout his lifetime.
  • On the high altar, thePala D’Orowas facing the crowd, the grave of Saint Mark below.
  • The new Patriarch came dressed up in lavish crimson finery, and sure enough, he bestowed a special blessing to Venice.
  • I was overwhelmed by the experience.
  • Greetings from the city of Venice.
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Titian and Venice: all you need to know about the city on water to better understand Titian

Art critics are fond of arguing that Florence valued the lines, but Venice wanted just color. As a result, according to legend, only Venice was able to produce Titian, the world’s greatest colorist. However, that is not the subject of our stories. During this tour, we will tell you about Venice from several angles, including its politics and prostitutes, its taxis and newspapers, its food and diseases, and how it all shaped the life of Titian (and, to a lesser extent, his contemporaries — includingda VincitoVasari).

  • Titian’s Our Lady of Sorrows, 1550, at the Louvre
  • Titian’s Our Lady of Sorrows, 1554, at the Prado
  • Titian’s Our Lady of Sorrows, 1550, at the Louvre
  • Titian’s Our Lady of Sorrows, 1550, at the Prado
  • Titian’s Our Lady of Sorrows, 15

Among the works by Titian are Our Lady of Sorrows (1550), which can be found in the Louvre, and Our Lady of Sorrows (1554), which can be found in the Prado. Among the works by Titian are Our Lady of Sorrows (1550), which can be found in the Louvre and Titian’s Our Lady of Sorrows (1554), which can be found in the Prado and Titian’s Our Lady of Sorrows (1550), which can

  • Titian’s female portrait is one of his most famous works. 1500-1510, National Gallery of London
  • Titian. 1515, Uffizi Gallery, Florence
  • Titian.

Titian’s female portrait is one of his most famous works.

1500-1510, National Gallery of London; Titian. 1515, Uffizi Gallery, Florence; Titian.

  • Cameria is the daughter of Sultan Suleiman (?). Painting with oil on canvas, 1555. The location is unclear
  • La Sultana Rossa is a fictional character (Red-haired Sultana). Around the year 1550. The Ringling Museum is located in Orlando, Florida. Sarasota, Florida, United States

It is possible that Cameria is the sultan Suleiman’s daughter. In 1555, an oil painting on canvas was created. The site of La Sultana Rossa is not known; nonetheless (Red-haired Sultana). 1550. The year is unknown. The Ringling Museum of Art is located in downtown Orlando, Florida. Florida, United States of America; Sarasota

  • Titian. Portrait of a Man with a Glove. 1520, The Louvre
  • s Titian. Portrait of a Venetian Nobleman

Titian attempted to concoct a plot against Giovanni Bellini in order to secure a favorable administrative post in the city of Venice. It has always been the city’s habit to act as a salt mediator between the two sides. Back then, it was considered that artists were the most adept at comprehending mineral compositions (it did not matter whether those were pigments for paints or edible salt). Actually, by the time of Titian, the mediator’s role had been reduced to little more than ceremonial. Nonetheless, it brought with it several benefits, including the position of chief artist for the republic, 100 tax-free gold ducats each year, two helpers, and a beautiful studio.

Titian’s ruses were successful.

You might find everything you needed there: huge rooms, a glass roof that provided the fantastic illumination required for work, and even a private dock.

Only after his death, Titian, regretful of his rapacious nature, was transformed into a salt mediator.

San Mark’s Nicopeia loot from Constantinople 1204

“During one of these battles, the barons and Venetians bravely captured the banner of the Tyrant, but with even greater joy they captured a panel on which was painted the image of Our Lady, which the Greek Emperors had carried with them in their exploits since all their hopes for the health and salvation of the Empir were dashed. The barons and Venetians redoubled the War, conducting many great skirmishes from one area to another; it was during one Despite the fact that the Venetians valued this image above all other riches and jewels that they captured, it is still venerated with great reverence and devotion here in the church of San Marco, and it is one of the images that is carried in procession during times of war and plaque, as well as to pray for rain and pleasant weather.” Giovanni Ramusio was born in 1559.

  1. Towards the left, you may see a photograph of the symbol taken before the heist took place.
  2. Today, you may have a look at the gems that are on show in the Treasury of Saint Mark’s Basilica.
  3. It is virtually square in shape and measures 58cm x 55cm – 22 x 23 inches.
  4. It was relocated from the sacristy of Saint Mark’s to the present chapel on the left side of the church in 1618.
  5. The icon is housed in an antique Byzantine frame made of gilded metal and embellished with gold enamels, pearls, and jewels; the enamels have been rearranged to create a more pleasing composition.
  6. Later, when the gems were removed off the symbol, the heist resulted in much greater destruction.
  7. It was most likely established in the early 12th century with the sole purpose of accompanying the emperor and his army on campaign.

He and his family held a high regard for this historical figure.

They traveled with him as a group, as a family unit.

One of the boys went on to become an artist and a scholar.

Throughout his military adventures, John II and his family were accompanied by this relic of the past.

During the night, the image would have been transported inside the massive Imperial tent and set in a special chapel for John, his family, and the highest-ranking military men.

For John and his men the emblem symbolizes the Art of the Covenant which journeyed with the ancient armies of God and was on exhibit in the Temple of Jerusalem.

When the symbol was not on display, members of the imperial family wove veils that were encrusted with pearls and gems to protect it from the elements.

When John came to Constantinople for a military victory parade, he relinquished his gold, silver, and ivory chariot and had the image of the Virgin Mary put in a kiot that stood in his place.

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Tapestries were strung from windows and balconies while choirs sang songs to Christ and His Mother.

Following the chariot on foot were John and his family, as well as representatives from every branch of the military, as well as commercial guilds and aristocratic families from around the city.

The Virgin, according to John, was personally responsible for this significant triumph in his life.

This was a humiliating experience for John on a personal and public level.

John would have rummaged through his soul, looking for something he had done incorrectly.

It also followed him throughout all of his political efforts.

An alternate depiction of the emblem prior to the heist with the pearls is shown on the right side of the page.

As it turned out, a hurriedly created garrison of commoners commanded by a few young nobles took over the defense of the city, and the Hagia Sophia was the site of their victory against the enemy.

When the Venetians captured the symbol as war booty, they presented it to the city as a prize.

Because the Byzantines were heretics and not Christians, the Crusaders had been sanctioned by the Catholic church and were free to plunder and rape as they pleased.

It was necessary to put them to death.

Catholic bishops, priests, and monks accompanied the Latin soldiers as they plundered Constantinople, striking bargains for relics and enlisting the soldiers to perform their dirty job of defiling churches and sanctuaries, which they considered their sacred duty.

This icon painting was created at the finest icon painting workshop in the city as part of an Imperial contract and is painted in an extraordinarily beautiful technique.

This factory was in charge of creating the official photographs of John and his family, which were copied hundreds of times for use in courtrooms and public buildings across the world.

More of the workshop’s work may be found in the family Gospels of John II, which are available online.

Each of the eyes, eyelids, and brows is drawn with a great deal of confidence, and the whites of the eyes are particularly vivid.

Upon staring at the face for a long period of time, it practically appears to come to life; you can almost hear the Virgin speaking to John through it.

With these, the symbol would be far more visually appealing – and less damaged – than it now is.

The skull has shrunk in size, and the shoulders have become overly rounded.

In the course of its repair, the icon’s exquisite silver-gilt, gold cloisonné, and jeweled halos (as well as its gorgeous cover) were taken from the icon.

However, they were really attractive and fitting for the symbol, which, in my opinion, would have seemed barren without them.

An imposing delegation from Constantinople descended in Venice in February 1438 in preparation for a grand church assembly negotiating the unity of the churches that would be held in Italy later that month.

The following is a description of the visit: The pieces on display were extremely valuable and extremely wealthy in their own right, studded with priceless stones of outstanding size and purity.

Some were carved in stone with great skill, while others were crafted from the purest gold with great taste.

Following the Latin conquest of our city, these objects were brought here according to the law of booty ( ), and they were reunited in the form of a very large icon on top of the principal altar of our main choir, which can be seen from all parts of the city.

Among those who look at this icon of icons, those who own it experience feelings of pride, pleasure, and delectation, while those from whom it was taken — if they happen to be present, as in our case — see it as a source of sadness, sorrow, and dejection, according to our interpretation.

We were told that these icons originated from the templon of the most holy Great Church of the Most Holy Trinity.

Doge Dandolo died in Constantinople in 1205 when he was old and blind.

A symbol of the shift of power that has occurred recently, from Byzantium on the Golden Horn to Venice’s lagoons.

At the image below, you can see a 16th-century replica of the icon that is now housed in the National Museum of Ravenna. It depicts Christ’s standing stance, His body, and the hand of the Theotokos, which is carrying a linen napkin in her right hand. .

Below the picture is a map showing the location of the icon in Saint Mark’s marked with a red box

“The barons and the Venetians battered the walls and towers day and night with various machines, and redoubled the War, conducting many great skirmishes from one area to another; it was in one of these that they valiantly captured the banner of the Tyrant, but with much greater joy a panel on which was painted the image of Our Lady, which the Greek Emperors had continuously carried in their exploits since all their hopes for the health and salvation of the Empir were dashed Despite the fact that the Venetians valued this image above all other riches and jewels that they captured, it continues to be venerated with great reverence and devotion in the church of San Marco, and it is one of the images that is carried in procession during times of war and plaque, as well as to pray for rain and good weather.” Giuseppe Ramusio was born in 1559 and died in 1607.

  • Towards the left of the screen is a photograph of the symbol taken before the heist took place.
  • On exhibit at the Treasury of Saint Mark’s are the diamonds that were discovered in the city.
  • It is virtually square in shape and measures 58cm by 55cm – 22 x 23 inches.
  • In 1618, it was relocated from Saint Mark’s Sacristy to the new chapel on the left side of the church, where it remains today.
  • The icon is housed in an antique Byzantine frame made of gilded metal and embellished with gold enamels, pearls, and jewels; the enamels have been re-arranged to provide a more pleasing overall appearance.
  • Afterwards, when the gems were torn off the symbol, the heist caused much greater harm.
  • In order to accompany the emperor and his army on campaign, it was most likely founded in the early 12th century.
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In the eyes of him and his family, this symbol was a priceless treasure.

John and his wife, the Hungarian Princess Eirene, were married for thirty years.

Soldiering was a vocation for three of the lads, who followed in their father’s footsteps.

Given that both the Virgin and Christ’s gaze are turned to the left, it is likely that the icon was placed on the right side of an entrance to the Imperial tent, or the door of a sanctuary or chapel, when it was painted.

To let the warriors to view and worship it, it would have been exhibited alongside imperial banners and flags on poles that also held pictures of saints and angels.

In addition to priests, the image was surrounded by attendants.

In the same way that it brought triumph to Israel, this icon had the same capability of bringing victory to the Christian dominion.

When it crossed the sea, the symbol was transported in the gilded Imperial galley.

There were tens of thousands of Byzantines lined up along the roadway, which was decorated with myrtle, grape leaves, and rosemary throughout the procession.

Tapestries hung from windows and balconies, while choirs sang hymns to Christ and His Mother.

In this case, the triumph in question was the recovery of the ancestral stronghold of the Komnenian dynasty, Kastamon, from the Muslim Turks.

Unfortunately, the Turks retook the city only a few months later.

The fact that the Theotokos had revoked his victory must have been difficult to comprehend for him.

John’s youngest son, Manuel, took over as his successor and carried on his father’s dedication to the icon in his own right.

Manuel had the belief that Christ played the same function for him as John held the belief that the Virgin spoke to him and gave him instruction.

The image was captured by bloodied Crusader soldiers in 1204 after a hand-to-hand battle with the Byzantine defenders of the city at the Pantepotes Monastery, which was the Byzantines’ last stand before being besieged and defeated.

The Varangian Guard, refusing to battle until they were paid in gold, moved aside and let the Latin forces to devastate the city as they pleased.

That God had now moved His blessing from Constantinople to Venice through the use of power was a symbolic representation of this.

Murdering them was not a sin and would be blessed by Christ Himself, according to the Catholic church.

The theft of the churches was also justified on the grounds that it was redistributing their assets to the genuine church of Jesus Christ.

From a long distance and in poor light, the Nicopeia was intended to be seen.

Possibly a workshop associated with the manuscripts of Kokkinophatos Among the photos of John and his family that were printed hundreds of times for use in court and public buildings were those created by this factory, which is now closed.

In the family Gospels of John II, you may see much more of the workshop’s work.

Each of the eyes, eyelids, and brows is drawn with a great deal of confidence, and the whites of the eyes are very dazzling!

Upon staring at the face for a long period of time, it practically appears to come to life; you can almost hear the voice of Mary speaking to John through it.

If you used them, the symbol would be far more appealing – and less damaged.

The head has shrunk in size, and the shoulders have become too rounded in appearance.

During the restoration process, the icon’s exquisite silver-gilt, gold cloisonné, and jeweled halos (as well as its gorgeous cover) were removed.

However, they were really attractive and fitting for the symbol, which, in my opinion, would have appeared barren if they had not been included.

It was in February 1438 when a huge group from Constantinople landed in Venice, on their way to the great church conference in Italy, where they were discussing the unity of all the churches.

An account of the visit may be found at this link: The artifacts on display were extremely valuable and extremely valuable indeed, studded with priceless stones of outstanding size and purity, and they were extremely valuable and very rich indeed!

Some were carved with great skill in stone, while others were crafted with exquisite taste from the finest gold.

Following the Latin invasion of our city, these artefacts were transported here according to the law of loot ( ), and they were rejoined in the shape of a very huge icon on top of the central altar of our main choir, which can be seen from all parts of the cathedral.

It is interesting to note that among those who look at this symbol of icons, those who own it experience pride, joy, and delectation, while those from whom it was taken — if they chance to be there, as was the case in our instance — perceive it as an object of melancholy, sorrow, and dejection .

We were certain, however, that they were from the Pantokrator Monastery because of the inscriptions and depictions of the Komnenoi on the objects.

.He would have transported the icon to Venice as the most significant trophy of the devastation of Constantinople as soon as it was discovered.

In the image below, you can see a 16th-century copy of the icon that is presently housed in the National Museum of Ravenna, Italy. A linen napkin is held in the hand of the Theotokos, which represents Christ’s position, His body, and the hand of the Theotokos .

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