Who Was The First American Born Saint

Elizabeth Ann Seton becomes first American-born saint

Elizabeth Ann Seton is canonized by Pope Paul VI in the Vatican in Rome, making her one of the first Catholic saints to be born in the United States of America. Originally from New York City, Elizabeth Bayley was the daughter of an Episcopalian physician and was born in 1774. She spent a large portion of her time to charitable work with the destitute, and in 1797 she established the Society for the Relief of Poor Widows with Small Children in New York City, which continues to this day. She married William Seton in 1803 and moved to Italy with him the following year, when she became acquainted with the Roman Catholic Church.

The Sisters of Charity of St.

Mother Seton and the sisters of the order relocated to an impoverished parish a few months later, where they gave free education to underprivileged children in the community.

Seton Hall University was established in her honor in 1856.

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From socialite to saint: The story of the first U.S.-born saint

Elizabeth Ann Seton was canonized as the first American-born saint more than 150 years after her death, making her the first American-born saint. During a ceremony in St. Peter’s Square on September 14, 1975, Pope Paul VI declared Elizabeth Ann Seton to be a saint, a statement that was later confirmed by the Vatican. “St. Elizabeth Ann Seton was born in the United States. All of us say this with special joy, and with the intention of honoring the land and the nation from which she sprang forth as the first flower in the calendar of the saints.

  1. Rejoice in the accomplishment of your glorious daughter.
  2. And know how to preserve her fruitful heritage.” The author, Elizabeth Ann Bayley, was born into a prominent Episcopal family in New York and raised in a high-society environment, but she desired to live a very simple life.
  3. When Will’s father died, the young couple was left in charge of Will’s six half-brothers and sisters as well as the family company.
  4. Sadly, in a short time, the family company and Will’s health both began to decline.
  5. Elizabeth found great comfort in the Bible and turned to the Scriptures when dealing with the difficulties of death and suffering.
  6. Several of her Italian friends guided her in Catholic instruction, and upon her return to New York, she was received into the Catholic Church on March 14, 1805.
  7. Elizabeth Ann Seton began an academy for young ladies, as was common for widows of her social standing during that time, but after news of her conversion to Catholicism spread, most parents withdrew their daughters.

Mary’s College.

The visiting priest offered her a resident teaching position.

It was the first congregation of religious sisters to be founded in the United States, and its school was the first free Catholic school in America.

In 1810, the sisters adopted the rules and constitution of St.

A group of buildings was constructed, including a residence for the Sisters, a novitiate, a boarding school for young girls, a school for poor children and an orphan asylum.

Like her husband before her, she died of tuberculosis in 1821.

Today, six separate religious congregations trace their roots to the beginnings of the Sisters of Charity in Emmitsburg.

The centerpiece of the exhibit is the actual banner which hung in St.

“40 Years a Saint: A Premier Exhibition” National Shrine of Saint Elizabeth Ann SetonMuseum Open 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

A Day Celebrating the Gift Mother Seton is to the American Church September 13, 2015Guided tours, presentations at historic houses, new exhibit, and first person interpretation by living historian portraying Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton, 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

Lori, Archbishop of Baltimore, 1:30 p.m.

A Day Celebrating the Education Legacy in Catholic Education September 14, 2015Thanksgiving Liturgy celebrated by Bishop Gainer, Bishop of Harrisburg, PA, 11 a.m. Thanksgiving Liturgy, 1:30 p.m. For more information, visitwww.setonheritage.org/40years

The first American-born saint: Mother Elizabeth Ann Seton

Founder of the Sisters of Charity, St. Elizabeth Seton was a young widow with five children when she founded the order in 1809. May 25, 2013, at the National Shrine of Elizabeth Ann Seton in Emmitsburg, Maryland, she is depicted here with her family. (Photo courtesy of Shutterstock)” data-medium-file=” data-large-file=” alt=” Founder of the Sisters of Charity, St. Elizabeth Seton was a young widow with five children when she founded the order in 1809. May 25, 2013, at the National Shrine of Elizabeth Ann Seton in Emmitsburg, Maryland, she is depicted here with her family.

May 25, 2013, at the National Shrine of Elizabeth Ann Seton in Emmitsburg, Maryland, she is depicted here with her family.

First in a series

In New York, she lived on Wall Street and was the daughter of a wealthy Anglican couple; she was the wife of a prominent businessman; she was the mother of five children; she was well educated and vivacious; she was talented in music and horsemanship; she spoke fluent English and French; she was well-known in the city’s upper-class cultural circles. Who could have predicted what would happen to her when she was 31 years old? The Most Reverend Thomas J. Olmsted is the presiding bishop of the Diocese of Phoenix.

  • Olmsted serves as the bishop.
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  • Olmsted serves as the bishop.
  • Actually, it began far earlier than that.
  • Several years later, she would reflect that her sorrows had resulted in a huge benefit for her family.
  • Grievances met with prayer and faith sowed seeds that would eventually lead her closer to Christ and into full communion with the Catholic faith community.
  • Having been persuaded by a group of friends and convinced that Catholicism contained the entirety of the Christian religion, she was accepted into full communion with the Church in the year AD 1805, when she was only 31 years old.

The deaths of her young children occurred not long after this event occurred.

In the midst of all of this, Elizabeth was like the Magi: what characterized her was not monetary poverty, not the loss of friends and family, and not even the things that broke her heart, but rather the things that brought her joy.

It is tempting to gaze at the Nativity scene and get too emotional, forgetting how terrible the reality into which the Child Jesus was born was at the same time.

When illuminated by the light of faith, Elizabeth Seton was able to see beyond what the world could see and to hear the profound longing for God that had been instilled in her heart by God.

She was not happy with simply becoming a disciple; she immediately sought out to pass on her faith to others, beginning with her own children and other young children.

It was in March the following year, in the year AD 1809, that she took her vows and, with a small group of other young women, established the first Religious Institute in America, which would come to be known as the Sisters of Charity.

It is simple to understand why she was referred to as Mother Seton.

May the delight of spiritual fruitfulness inspire you to live your life to the fullest.

“Mary cannot be understood apart from her motherhood, and the Church cannot be understood apart from her maternity, and you are symbols of Mary and of the Church,” says the Pope.

By deepening one’s dedication to the Cross of Christ, it pulls one’s attention closer to the Cross of Christ.

As we enter this Year of Consecrated Life, which has been designated by Pope Francis, I invite you to reflect on the lives of men and women whom God has called to serve Him in this way, including persons of heroic virtue such as Mother Seton and men and women religious such as those who serve in the Diocese of Phoenix.

Let us express our gratitude to God for them and remember to keep them in our prayers.

St. Elizabeth Seton: First American-born Saint

St. Elizabeth Ann Seton is the only Saint to have been born in the United States of America. Because she had experienced such immense loss and grief, she dedicated her life to serving the needs of others. A reflection on her life by Juan Ruiz, SJ, who reminds us that her devotion serves as a model for us to follow. When faced with personal grief and motivated by the needs of a newly formed nation, Elizabeth Ann Seton’s unselfish reaction resulted in her being canonized as the first American-born saint in the Catholic Church.

  1. Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton, who was born in 1774 into a well-to-do Protestant family, was a true daughter of the American Revolution.
  2. She married a wealthy businessman when she was 19 years old, with whom she had five children.
  3. His company collapsed, and he was diagnosed with TB as a result of his illness.
  4. His health was never the same again.
  5. She traveled to Maryland with little in her possession and established the state’s first free parochial school for the education of girls.
  6. The unselfish attitude of Elizabeth Ann Seton in the face of tragedy and insurmountable circumstances resulted in her being recognized as a real founder of the American Catholic Church and a role model for us today.
  7. Elizabeth Ann Seton, intercede on our behalf.
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The Conversion of Elizabeth Ann Seton: First American-born Saint

Elizabeth Ann Seton is a saint for our day, and we are fortunate to have her. For a time of doubt and uncertainty, we have in Elizabeth Ann Seton a woman of faith; for a time of coldness and separation, we have in Elizabeth Ann Seton a woman of hope; for a time of crisis and discouragement, we have in Elizabeth Ann Seton. As the first native-born citizen of the United States to be canonized a saint, Elizabeth Bayley Seton hailed from an English family that had relocated to colonial New York. Doctor Richard Bayley was her father, and Catherine Charlton was her mother, who was the daughter of an Anglican priest.

  1. Mrs.
  2. Bayley married Charlotte Barclay a short time afterwards.
  3. In this way, Elizabeth had a link to both Presidents Roosevelt through her stepmother, Eleanor Roosevelt.
  4. Her Childhood and Adolescence Elizabeth was born on August 28, 1774, on the eve of the American Revolution, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  5. Trinity Church, Wall Street, which is quite near to the current New York Stock Exchange, was the spiritual heart of the city in the late eighteenth century, bringing the city’s social and cultural elite together in one place.
  6. The couple married in a fancy ceremony and, after a period of time spent with the Setons, moved into their own house, Number 27 Wall Street, in the heart of New York City’s financial district.
  7. Her spouse, who was not very devout.

In today’s world, he would be referred to as an executive.

(1)Elizabeth, on the other hand, was the one who was pious.

He was the youngest of three assistant ministers who worked under Benjamin Moore, the rector of Trinity Church in New York.

(2) He had met John Henry Newman while in England, and the convert cardinal had been struck by his knowledge and humor.

In Elizabeth’s case, Hobart had a complicated personality to deal with: Betty had gathered an extraordinary jumble of beliefs and observances throughout the course of her life.

(3)Despite, or maybe because of, Elizabeth’s complexity, the two of them felt an almost instantaneous spiritual love to one another.

Consequently, John Henry Hobart and his wife (who happened to be the daughter of the minister who had presided at Elizabeth’s parents’ wedding) were frequent visitors at the house of the Setons, which was not unusual.

The soother and comforter of the distressed spirit is a type of companion that is not frequently encountered.

The family relocated from Wall Street to Number 8 State Street, a home near the geographical extremity of Manhattan Island with panoramic views of the river and the bay, at some point later, as a result of William Seton’s financial woes.

(Today, this site serves as the site of the Our Lady of the Rosary shrine church.) InItaly William Seton’s health began to deteriorate in 1802, and he was encouraged to relocate to a climate that would be more favourable to his rehabilitation.

Filippo was the founder and CEO of the Filicchi company.

Among the patriots he knew were Washington, Jefferson, and Madison.

Filippo served as the United States consul at Leghorn, which was rare for a native Italian and stood as a testament to the high regard with which he was held.

His attractive and lovely wife, Amabilia, was to become quite close to Elizabeth Seton throughout the course of their relationship.

His body was laid to rest at the Protestant cemetery in Leghorn, Italy, in December 1803, after a long illness.

It is virtually likely, however, that it began when she was living in Italy; there is nothing to suggest that she had a strong interest to the Catholic Church prior to that, while she was still residing in New York City.

Additionally, we know that when on a journey to Florence, she went to see the cathedral (the Duomo), the Church of San Lorenzo, Santa Maria Novella, and the Medici Chapel, and that she was completely enthralled by the magnificence of these structures.

If I could find You in the church like they do, how glad I would be, even though I am thousands of miles away from everyone I hold dear.

(5) Her fervent prayer to God that she would be able to locate him appears to be a clear indication that she desired to believe in the Catholic belief of the Real Presence of God.

She read Francis de Sales’ Introduction to the Devout Life, a polemical work titled “The Unerring Authority of the Catholic Church,” Bossuet’s Exposition of Catholic Doctrine, and an orderly, step-by-step development of the Church’s history, compiled and handwritten byFilippo with assistance from a priest friend, Father Pecci, among other things.

Her companion on the long sea voyage was Antonio Filicchi, who she met in Rome.

Aside from that, they basically embarked on a retreat by praying, fasting, and celebrating feast days with a special devotion.

They bombarded her with an endless bombardment of aggressive questions, the majority of which were based on their own shallow preconceptions and assumptions.

If it should appear that you have abandoned the religion of your forefathers, not because of educational prejudices, not because of a lack of better information, but because you are in opposition to light and knowledge which few have benefited from, my soul is anxious to know what response you will give to your Almighty Judge.

  1. And the book had an effect; it caused Elizabeth’s spirit to be tormented to an extreme degree.
  2. She swung back and forth, continuing to attend services in her own denomination but growing less and less comfortable with herself.
  3. (7)Sometime later, she wrote to Amabilia’s husband, Antonio:After readingthe life of St.
  4. The first stepis it notto proclaim I believe all that is taught by the Council of Trent?
  5. In 1783, the church received as its formal name the ProtestantEpiscopal Church.
  6. There were many important adjustments, one of which was that the previous Book of Common Prayer said that during communion “the Body and Blood of Christ.

Following the amendment, it now states that the Body and Blood of Christ are “spiritually taken and accepted.” (11) Elizabeth’s deep commitment to the Anglican sacrament and her readiness to adopt the stringent Roman Catholic doctrine in the Real Presence are explained by the previous phrasing.

  • I have been where?” the entrance of the Church of St.
  • .
  • Seton was admitted into the Catholic Church by Father William O’Brien, who served as her sponsor.
  • Several of her old friends and fellow parishioners believed she was insane, and they formed a deep dislike for her.
  • She eventually left New York and relocated to Baltimore with her children, where she continued to work in a similar capacity.
  • The core, or nucleus, of the Sisters of Charity was formed by a group of like-minded women who rallied around Mary in her early years.
  • Mother Seton and her community relocated from Baltimore to the little town of Emmitsburg, Maryland, which is not far from the Pennsylvania state boundary.
  • Catholic education in the United States got its start in this quiet, peaceful corner of rural America more than a century ago.
  • A woman’s ardent desire for the Real Presence of our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament resulted in the establishment of all of this.

Let us give thanks to God for this pious young lady from New York, for this courageous lady from the Lord’s Church. (11) NOTES AT THE END

  1. Elizabeth Seton to Julia Scott, cited in Annabelle M. Melville,Elizabeth Bayley Seton(New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1951), 85-86
  2. Elizabeth Seton to Julia Scott, cited in Annabelle M. Melville,Elizabeth Bayley Seton(New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1951), 85-86
  3. Elizabeth Seton to Julia Scott, cited in Annabelle M. Melville,Elizabeth Bayley

Acknowledgement

“The Conversion of Elizabeth Ann Seton: The First American-born Saint,” by Father Charles P. Connor, is available online. No. 4 in the Catholic Dossier series (July – August 2001). This story has been reproduced with permission fromCatholic Dossier magazine. Contact the CatholicDossier subscription line at 1-800-651-1531.

The Author

Father Charles P. Connor, a pastor in the Diocese of Scranton, is a historian who specializes in the history of the Catholic Church. It is based on a chapter from his book Classic Catholic Converts, which you can see here (Ignatius Press). Copyright 2001Catholic Dossierreturn to top of page

How Mother Cabrini Became the First American Saint

Being a saint takes a long time, unless you’re Frances Cabrini, the lady who was canonized as the first American saint 70 years ago this month. In fact, by the time Catholicism had become widely established in the United States, becoming a saint was much more difficult than it had previously been, as TIMEexplained after Cabrini’s sainthood was confirmed. The Catholic Church had standardized the canonization process by that time. The process of investigating miracles performed by the candidate became so time-consuming that the church was less willing to undertake it unless there was strong preexisting support for the person in question.

  • When it came to Cabrini, however, Pope Pius XI decreed that the canonization process may begin as soon as possible following her death, which occurred in 1917.
  • It wasn’t only a question of her claiming to have performed the necessary miracles.
  • Pope Leo XIII had sent her to work among the Italian immigrants who, in the view of the Church, were not being welcomed or prospering in the New World, and, even worse, were losing their faith and piety as a result of their experiences.
  • To raise funds for their first orphanage, they begged their way through the slums of Little Italy, and eventually managed to establish a small, ill-equipped hospital for the impoverished of the Italian countryside.
  • For the following 28 years, she traveled nonstop, establishing schools, hospitals, orphanages, and novitiates in places such as Chicago, New Orleans, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Seattle, Denver, and other locations across the United States.
  • Her financial acumen in securing land for these organizations and getting the means to pay for it earned her the reputation of being something of a saintly Hetty Green in the eyes of many a successful businessman.
  • In the face of a horde of highbinding Chicago contractors who attempted to outwit the sisters while converting a hotel into a hospital, the petite Italian nun fired them out of hand, tucked up her habit, and trekked about the scaffolding for weeks supervising the laborers herself.
  • Sign up for the weekly TIME History newsletter to get all of your historical fix in one place.

The first saint to be born in the United States would come much later, in 1975, when Elizabeth Ann Seton was canonized. The complete story may be found here in the TIME Vault: The very first saint of the United States TIME Magazine has more must-read stories.

  • Being a saint takes a long time, unless you’re Frances Cabrini, the lady who became the first American saint 70 years ago this month. It was a lot more difficult to become a saint by the time Catholicism had become widely established in the United States, as TIMEexplained after Cabrini’s sainthood was proven, since the Catholic Church had standardized the canonization process. Due to the time and effort required to thoroughly investigate the candidate’s miracles, the church was less willing to take on the investigation unless there was strong preexisting support for the candidate, and in addition, the candidate had to have been dead for at least 50 years before the investigation could be undertaken. With regard to Cabrini, however, Pope Pius XI agreed that the canonization process might begin as soon as possible after her death in 1917, which occurred in 1917. (One less-than-pleasant aspect of the procedure was that her body was unearthed in 1938 so that one of her limbs could be transported to Rome for ceremonial usage as a relic, which was a less-than-pleasant element of the process.) That which distinguished her from the rest. That she claimed to have performed the necessary miracles wasn’t all that was at stake. When she was declared a saint, TIME magazine characterized her like this: ” Father Francis Xavier Cabrini, a petite, fragile nun from Lombardy who was the daughter of a farmer, came in New York on March 31, 1889, with six nuns of the order she had founded, the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, and began her mission. As a result of her work with Italian immigrants, Pope Leo XIII sent her to work among those who, in the view of the Church, were not finding a welcoming nor prosperous home in America, but, even worse, were losing their religious convictions. It was Mother Cabrini and her six daughters who were assigned to serve in the slums of New York City. Having scrounged their way through the filth of Little Italy to raise funds for their first orphanage, they were able to establish a small, ill-equipped hospital for the impoverished of Italy. Though Mother Cabrini’s strong will surmounted hurdles that looked insurmountable time and time again, the cash she received were primarily in the form of pennies. As a result, she spent the next 28 years traveling tirelessly throughout the United States, establishing schools, hospitals, orphanages, and novitiates in cities such as Chicago and New Orleans
  • Philadelphia
  • Los Angeles
  • Seattle
  • Denver
  • And other locations. Her financial acumen in purchasing land for these organizations and getting the finances to pay for it earned her the reputation of being something of a saintly Hetty Green in the eyes of many a clever investor. And she was as fierce as she was cunning in her dealings with the authorities. In the face of a horde of highbinding Chicago contractors who attempted to outwit the sisters while converting a hotel into a hospital, the petite Italian nun fired them out of hand, tucked up her habit, and trudged about the scaffolding for weeks supervising the workmen herself. She was an American with a heart of gold, and she became a citizen of the United States in 1909, when she was 59 years old. Sign up for the monthly TIME History newsletter to get your history fix all in one place. She was born in Italy, but because of her American citizenship, she was recognized as the world’s first saint. Several years later in 1975, Elizabeth Ann Seton was canonized, making her the first American saint born in this country. For further information, see the following link in the TIME Vault: U.S. Saint Patrick’s Day TIME Magazine has more must-read articles.
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Being a saint takes a long time, unless you’re Frances Cabrini, the lady who was canonized as the first American saint 70 years ago. It was a lot more difficult to become a saint by the time Catholicism was widely established in the United States, as TIMEexplained after Cabrini’s sainthood was proven, since the Catholic Church had standardized the canonization process. The process of investigating miracles performed by the candidate became so time-consuming that the church was less willing to undertake it unless there was strong preexisting support for the person in question.

  1. When it came to Cabrini, however, Pope Pius XI agreed that the canonization process may begin as soon as possible following her death in 1917.
  2. It wasn’t just an issue of her claiming to have performed the necessary miracles.
  3. Pope Leo XIII had sent her to work among the Italian immigrants who, in the view of the Church, were not being welcomed or prospering in the New World, and, even worse, were losing their faith and devotion.
  4. They begged their way through the filth of Little Italy to raise funds for their first orphanage, and eventually managed to establish a small, ill-equipped hospital for the Italian poor.
  5. For the following 28 years, she traveled nonstop, establishing schools, hospitals, orphanages, and novitiates in places such as Chicago, New Orleans, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Seattle, Denver, and other locations around the United States.
  6. She was also as tough as she was cunning.
  7. She was a true patriot of the United States, and in 1909, when she was 59 years old, she became a citizen of the United States.
  8. Despite the fact that she was born in Italy, her citizenship in the United States earned her the honor of becoming the first American saint.

The first saint to be born in the United States would be Elizabeth Ann Seton, who was canonized in 1975. The complete story may be found in the TIME Vault: Saint John the Baptist was the first American saint. More must-read articles from Time magazine

How a Wealthy Socialite Became the First American-Born Saint

The Shrine Chapel at Saint Joseph’s Provincial House, subsequently called the Basilica at the National Shrine of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton, in Emmitsburg, Maryland, on September 14, 1975, with a close-up of an Elizabeth Ann Seton statue. It was shot on the day Elizabeth Seton (1774 – 1821), the founder of St. Vincent de Paul Society, was canonized by Pope Paul VI in Rome, making her the first native-born American to be named a Saint by the Roman Catholic Church. Featured Image Courtesy of Ann E.

However, there have been several unexpected saints over the years, one of them being Elizabeth Ann Seton, who was the first saint to be born in the United States.

But she worked diligently to assist the underprivileged, and she was canonized in September 1974 for her efforts.

The popular Betty Bayley

Elizabeth Ann Bayley, sometimes known as Betty Bayley, was born in New York City in 1774 and raised there with her family and friends. Her father was a well-regarded surgeon, and both of her parents were descended from families who were among the first European immigrants in the region. She grew up in a family of pioneers. Elizabeth Seton as depicted in a portrait. Engraving with an unknown date. Photo by Bettmann / Contributor (original source). Following the death of her mother in 1777, her father remarried in order to provide a mother for his two children.

Despite the fact that Elizabeth was an Episcopalian at the time, she was already developing a strong desire to aid others who were less fortunate than herself.

The wedding of the year that became a short marriage

When Elizabeth and Charles were married in 1794, it was the most important social event of the year. Elizabeth was just 19 years old at the time, and her husband, William, was a successful businessman who was 25 years old at the time. Elizabeth would continue to visit the impoverished in her new area with the assistance of her new sister-in-law, Rebecca Seton. Her father pushed her to participate in the founding of the Society for the Relief of Poor Widows with Small Children, which was established in 1797.

  1. When William’s father died, the family’s fortunes had already begun to deteriorate as a result of the uncertain economic conditions that existed prior to the War of 1812.
  2. Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton (1774-1821) was beatified in 1963 and canonized as the first American-born saint in 1975, making her the first saint born in the United States.
  3. William’s TB, which had been a lifetime problem, became worse as a result of the stress.
  4. Unfortunately, William passed away in Italy and was buried there as well.

The Filcchi brothers, his former business partners, took up Elizabeth and her daughter as they awaited the return of their ship back to England. In the course of her time with them, Elizabeth became acquainted with Catholicism.

A new faith loses her friends

The next June, when she went home to New York City, she joined St. Peter’s Church, the city’s last remaining Roman Catholic church. Her confirmation took place in 1806. When Elizabeth found herself unexpectedly widowed in New York, she decided to open either an academy for young girls or a boarding home for males (reports vary on which it was). Regardless of whose account you believe is accurate, the fact remains that as word of her conversion spread, many parents withdrew their children from her care.

Elizabeth would be subjected to the ridicule of her peers for a number of years.

A fresh start in Emmitsburg

Elizabeth relocated to Emmitsburg, Maryland, in 1809, at the request of the president of St. Mary’s College in Baltimore, where she established the Saint Joseph’s Academy and Free School, which is still in operation today. It was the very first Catholic parochial school to be formed in the United States of America. around the year 1797: Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton was born in the town of Seton in the county of York. The image is courtesy of the Hulton Archive/Getty Images. Many other women volunteered to assist her, and a religious community sprang up around the school as a result.

Sisters of St.

Joseph) were established, and Elizabeth was designated as “Mother Seton” by the congregation.

She had only been a practicing Catholic for 16 years, but she had left a significant legacy as a result of her efforts.

Elizabeth helped to cure three individuals

It is necessary for someone to be martyred or to be responsible for two miracles in order to be declared a saint. After people prayed for Elizabeth, she began to perform miracles from beyond the dead. Sister Gertrude Korzendofer, who was suffering from pancreatic cancer in the 1930s, was miraculously cured after praying to Elizabeth. Ann Theresa O’Neill, then four years old, was healed of leukemia in 1952 when a nun interceded on her behalf with Queen Elizabeth. In St. Peter’s Square, Pope Paul VI stands beneath a steel tube scaffolding, accompanied by two unnamed priests, during the canonization rite of the first American saint, Elizabeth Ann Seton, who was born in the United States on September 14.

Photo by Bettmann / Contributor (original source).

Kalin, who was brought to a hospital in 1963 with meningitis of the brain and miraculously survived the infection.

The Sisters of Charity of New York paid him a visit, prayed for him, and placed a relic (one of Elizabeth’s bones) on his body. The next morning, with no medical explanation as to how he had regained consciousness, he woke up in the hospital.

Saint Elizabeth Ann Seaton

On March 17, 1963, Elizabeth was declared a saint. As part of the event, Pope John XXIII said the following about her: “In a house that was very little, but with plenty of space for charity, she sowed a seed in America that, by the grace of God, developed into a large tree. As part of her canonization ceremony on September 14, 1975, Pope Paul VI offered his own remarks in her honor: “Elizabeth Ann Seton was totally American! Rejoice in the accomplishment of your wonderful daughter. “You should be proud of her.” Cathedral of the National Shrine of St.

It is believed that her remains are interred at the Basilica of the National Shrine in Emmitsburg, Maryland.

“She is also the patron saint of those who are opposed to Church authority.”

The first of three

Before Elizabeth was canonized, Time magazine said that Italy had 40,000 native-born saints while the United States had none at all in the early 1960s. Elizabeth, on the other hand, was the first of three American saints to be canonized. These are commemorative medals made in honor of Mother Elizabeth Seton’s canonization, which will take place in St. Peter’s Basilica on September 14. As the first native-born American Roman Catholic saint, Mother Seton, founder of the Sisters of Charity, will be canonized this year.

More information from us: Unwrapping the Real St.

Kateri lived much longer ago, passing away in 1680 after suffering numerous torments from her Mohawk tribe as a result of her conversion to Christianity.

Who Was the First American to Be Canonized as a Saint?

On the fourth of January, we commemorate the death of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton. Among her many accomplishments, Elizabeth Ann Seton was the first American to be canonized as a saint, and she is most remembered for her participation in the establishment of Catholic school for children in the United States. ​

St. Elizabeth Ann Seton’s Early Life

Elizabeth was born on August 28, 1774, on the island of Staten Island, New York, and was reared in the Episcopal church. She married William Seton, a rich trader, when she was 20 years old. She had two children with him. Elizabeth and William had four children together during their marriage. Despite this, ten years after their marriage began, they were forced to file for bankruptcy after William’s firm suffered an unforeseen financial setback.

William became unwell, most likely as a result of the financial hardship, and the Setons chose to go to Italy in the hopes of restoring his health. Unfortunately, William did not recover and died in 1803 as a result of TB.

Ends and Beginnings

Following her travels through Italy, Elizabeth was inspired by the beauty of Catholicism and decided to become a Catholic in 1805. Many of her friends and family members did not react positively to this development, and some even ostracized her when she became a Christian. Elizabeth later opened a Catholic school for girls in Baltimore, Maryland, at the suggestion of a priest, in order to find a new purpose for her life.

The Mother of Parochial Schools in America

Elizabeth’s most significant contribution was the establishment of the Sisters of Saint Joseph in 1809, which was the first religious organization in the United States. The Sisters of Charity of Saint Joseph’s would later become known as the Sisters of Charity of Saint Joseph’s. This order provided assistance to hospitals and orphanages, but its most notable accomplishment was the establishment of the parochial school system in the United States. In the Trinity Dome, a mosaic tile depiction of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton depicts her.

Expressive Elizabeth

Elizabeth was also a very expressive person, who expressed herself by penning spiritual essays, hymn lyrics, and music composition. Elizabeth penned a lovely confession of faith near the end of her life, which is as follows: The blessed chain is being built up link by link. The Body of Christ is made up of two parts: He is the head and we are members. All of us have one Spirit, which is dispersed by the Holy Ghost in us all, and one hope – He in Heaven and Eternity. By his Word and through his Church, there is only one faith.

One God, our loving LordOne Father, we his children – above all, through all, and in allWho can resist, all self must be slain and destroyed by this cannon of love – one, one, oneWho can resist, all self must be killed and destroyed by this artillery of love – one, one, one Who could possibly be on the other side of this tie of togetherness, peace, and love?

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Elizabeth’s commitment to educating children and providing assistance to the less fortunate has had an influence that has lasted well beyond her own lifetime.

The external tympana of the West Façade, the Hall of American Saints, the Miracle Medal Chapel window, the Our Lady of Guadalupe Chapel, and the Trinity Dome mosaic all feature Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton.

Could This Wisconsin Man Become the First American-born Saint?

One dreary and rainy November day last year, thousands of people descended to Ford Field in Detroit to pay their respects to a modest Wisconsin-born priest who had passed away more than three decades before. In this case, it was a beatification service, which was just the third of its kind to be held on American soil, and it set the Rev. Solanus Casey on the route to sainthood, the greatest honor bestowed by the Catholic Church. The highlight of the occasion was a Mass presided over by a cardinal from the Vatican, who brought with him a letter in Latin from Pope Francis to read to the gathering flock of bishops, archbishops, cardinals, and lay people.

  1. Paula Medina Zarate carried a little wooden reliquary containing relics of the bones of Casey, the modest friar who had answered Zarate’s prayers by curing her excruciating hereditary skin problem, which she had suffered from since birth.
  2. Following an examination, the 2012 healing was validated by the church as a miracle, an act of God that prepared the way for Casey’s beatification, which is the first step on the path to sainthood.
  3. During the depths of the Great Depression, he established one of the city’s first soup kitchens to serve the poor.
  4. He was born into a poor, oppressed, and defenseless family.

Humble Beginnings

Bernard Francis Casey Jr. was born in the autumn of 1870 on the Casey family’s farm in the town of Oak Grove, Wisconsin, where he grew up. They had both been a part of the wave of Irish refugees escaping the Potato Famine, and they had landed on the high bluffs overlooking the Mississippi River, just below the river’s junction with the St. Croix, in quest of a decent and holy life for their family. “Barney,” their sixth kid and the youngest of 16 children, was thin, quiet, and reflective. When Casey was older, he recalled his childhood in Wisconsin with tremendous regard, recalling the sound of a large river moving by his family’s farm as one of his earliest childhood recollections.

  1. The Casey family suffered the loss of two daughters to diphtheria in 1878.
  2. Another setback occurred a few years later, when chinch bugs devastated the wheat crop on the family’s farming operation.
  3. Aside from that, he took odd jobs as a handyman and for a while as a prison guard, earning money to bring back home to help with the family’s struggling finances.
  4. He was 18 years old, and the female was 17 years old.
  5. By 1890, Casey had relocated to Superior, Wisconsin, a booming town with so many job prospects that the whole Casey family soon followed him to the area.
  6. He was back in his hometown with his family, he had recovered from the grief of his failed relationship, and he had a steady job as a streetcar driver.
  7. He was a simple person who found himself adrift in a fast-paced world.

A Shocking Call to God

Casey learned the hard way in 1891 about how quickly things can move. Superior was a nasty neighborhood back in the day. The industries that had fueled the rise of the city – mining, timber, steel, and coal – had attracted hordes of men who were hardworking and lived a hard life to the region, and the city had benefited from their presence. A bad reputation for brothels, dance halls, and saloons was earned by particular areas of the city. On an autumn day, Casey was driving his streetcar through one of these districts when he noticed a large group of people gathered around the rails.

  1. He immediately called 911.
  2. That image was astonishing to a mild-mannered young guy who equated his rural background with something close to biblical proportions.
  3. “Barney anguished about the course of his life in a way he had never done before, and he began to argue something very important to him.” The young man had picked up the phone and answered it.
  4. Francis de Sales Seminary in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
  5. Casey, on the other hand, never wavered once he had made up his mind.
  6. While at St.
  7. Indeed, he was seen as a popular student who was frequently sought out by the younger lads for help on life decisions and issues.
  8. However, as his studies proceeded, he began to experience difficulties in the classroom.
  9. All but two of the 13 teachers were German speakers, and students were required to take German and Latin classes.
  10. His superiors urged that he not continue his studies for the diocesan priesthood in 1895, which was the equivalent of the first year of college at the time.
  11. Later, he explained that it was as if his “brain just didn’t seem to want to do anything.” In 1896, he returned to his hometown, unsure of his future step.

Friend of Casey’s Brother Leo Wollenweber subsequently stated that the incident was “definitely frustrating and, in a way, embarrassing.” “However, he accepted it as part of God’s plan.”

The Simplex Priest

Casey would not have to wait long to find out what God’s purpose for his life was after he returned home. He applied to three holy orders after being advised to do so by a local priest. He was approved into all three. Casey was still confused of what he should do until, shortly after receiving Holy Communion at a December Mass, he heard the voice of the Blessed Virgin Mary, which he took to be the voice of the Virgin Mary. She advised that you travel to Detroit. The Capuchin Order was based in Detroit, which served as its headquarters.

  • He was so certain that it was God’s will that he departed just a few days before Christmas, despite the fact that his family persuaded him to wait until after the festive season.
  • Due to the fact that the monastery already had a Friar Francis, he was given the name Solanus.
  • He returned to Milwaukee in the summer of 1898, when he was nearly 28 years old, to study for the priesthood at the Capuchin seminary located at St.
  • Casey’s academic difficulties persisted until he returned to Milwaukee.
  • Casey was fully aware that the limitations of his intelligence may prohibit him from achieving his goal of becoming an ordained minister.
  • They determined that he would be ordained as a “simple priest,” meaning he would not be permitted to hear confessions or teach on theology, but would still be considered a real and full priest.
  • Francis chapel.
  • Joseph’s Church in Appleton, Wisconsin, in front of his adoring parents and siblings.

‘Shoulder to Shoulder with Life’

The beginnings of what would become a holy career were humble in nature. Casey’s first assignment was at Sacred Heart Monastery in Yonkers, New York, where he served for several years. He would work there for 14 years, advancing only to the post of porter, who was in charge of ringing the bell at the monastery door and caring for the altar at the church of St. Mary Magdalene. In fact, he was content to remain in this lowly position during his whole tenure in the church. His assignment to a parish in Harlem, where he sought out to the primarily African American men detained at the neighboring prison, organising a regular Sunday Mass for the neglected inmates, was completed in 1921 when he was moved to another parish in Harlem.

  1. And it was at that location that he would do his most important job.
  2. Bonaventure Monastery, he swiftly rose through the ranks to become the priest whom the congregation’s most distressed parishioners turned to for help.
  3. In the opinion of Brother Richard Merling, director of the Father Solanus Casey Guild and a key supporter for Casey’s canonization, Casey’s personal hardships enabled him to connect with individuals who were in need in a manner that others were unable to do so.
  4. “Being straightforward, being from such a huge family, and the family having undergone disasters, I was born.” He was shoulder to shoulder with life, and he understood what it was like.
  5. It was possible to perform miraculous recoveries on the ill and dyspeptic with just a few words and a light touch, which puzzled medical professionals.
  6. When he came across a person whose time on this planet was drawing to a close, he would say a short prayer for a pain-free passing.
  7. It took him virtually every day until 1956 to complete his ledgers, by which time he had gathered more than 6,000 entries.

According to Wollenweber, “to him, these benefits were a manifestation of the goodness and mercy of God’s love for his people.” Photo by AP Images of Paula Medina Zarate at Father Casey’s beatification ceremony.

A Road to Sainthood

Casey passed away on July 31, 1957, at the age of 86, following a decade of deteriorating health. Following his death, there was an outpouring of regard and affection, with an estimated 20,000 people attending his burial. Three years later, in Detroit, the Father Solanus Casey Guild was established to perpetuate his memory and to celebrate his various charitable contributions. After a lengthy investigation, the Capuchin generalate in Rome began the lengthy process of evaluating if Casey was worthy of canonization in 1967.

A group of Jesuit missionaries who were tortured and killed in upstate New York in the 1640s (the men were later beatified and canonized as martyrs) and Mother Frances Cabrini, a native-born citizen of the United States who was canonized in 1946, were the only saints associated with the United States at the time of their canonization.

  • “It takes a lot of time and money to promote a person to sainthood,” says Steven Avella, a history professor at Marquette University.
  • An investigation into Casey’s “holiness” was underway by 1977, with the Father Casey Guild carrying on his charitable work on behalf of the poor and the Capuchin soup kitchen continuing to serve thousands of people.
  • In the months following Casey’s death, the Guild had already began work on compiling a list of the cures and favors that had been credited to his intercession.
  • With the necessary framework in place, the first formal step towards canonization was completed in 1995.
  • Casey’s miracle, for which he was beatified, occurred at his previous monastery in Detroit, which was a fitting setting.
  • Bonaventure to pray at Casey’s tomb, which he described as “awesome.” While standing up from her grave, Zarate said to the Detroit Free Press that she felt a strong force and heard a voice asking her if there was anything she needed.
  • As she knelt, she was overcome with a tremendous heat and a sensation that she described as “being outside of my own body.” Soon after, her body began to lose the dry, scaly skin that had been causing her so much misery the day before.
  • The Detroit archdiocese conducted a thorough inquiry that resulted in a hefty dossier that was submitted to the Vatican on its behalf.
  • This was 50 years after the first attempts towards canonization were launched.
  • And, if so, when will it happen?
  • For Catholics in the United States, this would be a momentous occasion.

“The need to find role models and intercessors is ingrained in our DNA. Through these often extremely weak human beings, God accomplishes his will — in our weakness, his might achieves perfection. He selects the weak and transforms them into powerful individuals.”

American Saints

Only two of the 10,000 people who are currently venerated as saints by the Catholic Church were born in the United States. Elizabeth Ann Seton, born in New York in 1774, was the first person to be canonized, a distinction bestowed by Pope Paul VI in 1975. Elizabeth Ann Seton was canonized in 1975. Seton established the first religious sisters’ congregation in the United States. Katharine Drexel, a Philadelphia heiress and nun who dedicated her life to serving Native American and African American communities in the Southwest, was canonized by Pope John Paul II in 2000.

A small number of naturalized citizens and individuals who have been recognized for their work in the United States have also been designated as saints.

“It is a small number, but it is growing,” says Steven Avella, a history professor at Marquette University.

Solanus Casey is only the fourth person born in the United States to hold the title of “Blessed” at the present time.

Rother was murdered in 1981, when he was 46 years old, while carrying out missionary work in Guatemala, a crime that Pope Francis later described as an act committed “in hatred of the faith.”

‘Saint Solanus?’ appears in the April 2018issue ofMilwaukee Magazine.

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