Who Was Saint Ives

Marywood University History: Saint Ives

St. Ives was known as the “Ideal of the Legal Profession” and the “Patron Saint of Attorneys” because of his dedication to the legal profession. In the murals, he is depicted as the law. He had a universal sense of justice, law, and peace in his heart and in his soul. The radiance of such a soul is unconstrained by the boundaries established by man. St. Ives was born on October 17th, 1253, in Kermartin, Brittany, and died on May 19th, 1303, in Louannec, France. He was the patron saint of the city of Louannec.

He was a lawyer in Rennes and Treguier before becoming a member of the Franciscan Tertiary Order.

He earned the titles of advocate for the poor and patron of the poor because of his great zeal and integrity in the performance of his duties, as well as his great charity.

Treguier is the location of his relics.

Even children and their elders are unafraid to approach their kind benefactor, who is shown to be a doctor of laws.

He is just, refined, and vital, with a good spatial distribution, a picturesque vein, and a quiet medieval landscape in the background, all of which combine to create a compelling character.

Ivo of Kermartin – Wikipedia

SaintIvo of Kermartin,T.O.S.F.
Saint Ivo portrayed byRogier van der Weyden(15th century)
Advocate of the Poor
Born 17 October 1253 Kermartin,Duchy of Brittany
Died 19 May 1303 (aged 49)Louannec, Duchy of Brittany
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church(Third Order of St. FrancisBrittany)
Canonized June 1347 byPope Clement VI
Majorshrine Tréguier,Cotes d’Armor, France
Feast 19 May
Attributes represented with a purse in his right hand and a rolled paper in the other hand; depicted between a rich man and a poor one.
Patronage Brittany, lawyers, abandoned children

Theodore of Kermartin, T.O.S.F. (October 17th, 1253 – May 19th, 1303), also known as Yvo, Yves, or Ives (and in Bretonas Erwan, Iwan, YouennorEozenn, depending on the region, and known as Yves Hélory(alsoHeloriorHeloury) in French), was a poor priest among the destitute of Louanne In addition to Brittany, he is a supporter of attorneys and abandoned children. His feast day is on the 19th of May. Advocate of the Poor is the poetic title given to him by his contemporaries.

Life

Ivo du Kenquis was born on October 17, 1253, in Kermartin, a manor nearTréguierinBrittany, to Helori, lord of Kermartin, and Azo du Kenquis. He was the son of Helori, lord of Kermartin, and Azo du Kenquis. When Ivo was twelve years old, he was transferred to the Faculty of Law of Paris (University of Paris), where he received a degree in civil law. While other students were out having fun, Ivo was studying, praying, and visiting the sick. He also refused to consume any meat or drink any alcohol.

  • In 1277, he traveled to Orléans to study under Canon Lawunder Peter de la Chapelle, a well-known writer who went on to become the bishop of Toulouse and a cardinal.
  • He cared for orphans and widows, defended the needy, and delivered fair and unbiased rulings in his courtroom.
  • Ivo also defended the helpless in other courts, paid their bills, and financed their visits to them when they were in prison, among other things.
  • He was frequently called upon to assist numerous conflicting parties in settling out of court in order to save money.
  • Francis at Guingamp, which was founded in 1307.
  • He continued to practice law, and once, when a mother and son were unable to resolve many of their issues, he volunteered to perform a Mass for them.
  • They struck an agreement very instantly.
  • In the performance of his duties, he shown great passion and integrity, and he did not hesitate to oppose the king’s taxes, which he regarded an assault on the privileges of the Church.

His first assignment was to the parish of Tredrezin in 1285, and eight years later he was assigned to the parish of Louannec, where he died of natural causes after a life of hard effort and frequent fasting.

The Widow of Tours

In 1936, John Wigmore retold the legendary story of St. Ives and the Widow of Tours in an article published in the Fordham Law Review. He writes: Tours was close to Orleans, and it was there that the bishop conducted his court, and it was there that Ivo stayed with a specific widow while on his way to the court. He came home one day to find his widowed landlady in tears. Her story went that the following day she would have to appear in court to answer to a lawsuit brought against her by a traveling trader who had duped her.

  1. Doe had returned the next day and requested the coffin, claiming that his accomplice Roe had been held somewhere else.
  2. She said that if she was forced to pay for such things, she would go bankrupt.
  3. “You should have waited for the two guys to come together, but I will represent you in court tomorrow and save you from disaster,” he stated emphatically.
  4. The plaintiff has failed to establish his case.
  5. “Can you tell me where the other is?” “Allow the plaintiff to produce his co-defendant.” The court quickly granted his plea, prompting the merchant to turn pale and tremble in his shoes when he was ordered to bring his colleague.
  6. With his predicament raising suspicions, a court ordered him to be detained and questioned; the other merchant was also located and hauled in; and the casket was retrieved; when opened, it revealed that it contained nothing but old rubbish.
  7. As a result, the young lawyer saved the widow from financial catastrophe.

Legacy

In 2005, the relics of Saints Ivo and Tugdual were carried in a procession to the gate of Tréguier’s church. The skull of Saint Ivo is housed within the reliquary. Pope John Paul II made the following statement on the occasion of the 700th anniversary of the death of St. Ivo: “The ideals presented by St Ivo are still relevant today, which is remarkable. His concern for the promotion of fair justice and the defense of the rights of the poorest of the poor calls on those who are constructing the European Union today to make every effort to guarantee that the rights of everyone, particularly the weakest, be acknowledged and vigorously protected.” The patron saint of lawyers is Saint Yves.

For example, the Society of St.

Veneration

He was laid to rest in the church he established at Minihy-Tréguierin. There is a monument of his in the cathedral of Tréguier, where it is said that the following Latin inscription was found:

Sanctus Ivo erat BritoAdvocatus et non latroRes miranda populo St Ivo was a Breton,A lawyer and not a thief;A wonderful thing for the people to set eyes on

In June 1347, Pope Clement VI, at the behest of Philip I, the Duke of Burgundy, declared Ivo to be a saint. A large number of his parishioners testified at the investigation into his holiness in 1331, praising him for his kindness, stating that he preached frequently in both chapel and field, and that under his leadership, “the inhabitants of the land were twice as good as they had been before.” During his sermons, he placed a strong emphasis on the relationship between religion and good behavior, and he is said to have “chased immorality and vice from the town of Louannec.” A vision of Yves (and an experience of raptus) occurred sometime after 1362, during which he informed her, “If you are willing to renounce the world, you will taste here on earth the delights of paradise.” This was the first recorded vision of Yves.

Ivo is frequently depicted holding a purse in his right hand (to reflect all of the money he donated to the impoverished during his life) and a rolled piece of paper in his left hand (for his charge as a judge).

He is commemorated by the churches ofSant’Ivo alla Sapienza andSant’Ivo dei Bretoni in Rome, both of which are dedicated to him.

See also

  1. It has been asserted that this picture is a forgery from the twentieth century:Alberge, Dalya (2 February 2019). “‘It’s a Beatles haircut,’ says a historian of a 15th-century image that dates back to the 1960s.” The Guardian is a British newspaper. Obtainable on February 2, 2019
  2. Ab “St. Ives, Patron Saint of Lawyers,” according to John H. Wigmore in 1936. Fordham Law Review, volume 5, number 401
  3. Abc Tony Staley is a writer who lives in New York City. “Excellent as a lawyer, a judge, and a priest,” It was published in The Compass News, a publication of the Catholic Diocese of Green Bay in Wisconsin, on May 13, 2013. Archived on the internet Archive.today on July 20, 2013
  4. ABC “MacErlean, Andrew. “St. Ives.” The Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol. 8, New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1910. Accessed on July 20, 2013.” “MacErlean, Andrew. “St. Ives.” The Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol. 8, New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1910. The first Sunday in October 1910, according to New Advent.org. “Message of Pope John Paul II to Bishop Lucien Fruchaud of Saint-Brieuc and Treguier on the 700th Anniversary of the Birth of St. Ivo Helory of Brittany”, the Vatican, 13 May 2003. Retrieved 14 February 2019. Vatican.va. “About Us,” which was retrieved on February 14, 2019. It is the Society of St. Yves that you are looking for. 5th of December, 2019
  5. Retrieved

Sources

  • Acta Sanctorum col. 735
  • Hisvitais in the Acta Sanctorum col. 735
  • Vauchez, André (1993). Daniel E. Bornstein is a lawyer who practices in New York City (ed.). It is important to understand the religious beliefs and practices of the laity, which were prevalent during the Middle Ages. Margery J. Schneider has provided the translation. The University of Notre Dame Press is located in Notre Dame, Indiana.

External links

  • On Wikimedia Commons, you can find images and videos connected to Ivo of Kermartin. Wigmore, John H., “St. Ives, Patron Saint of Lawyers,” 5 Fordham Law Review 401 (1936)
  • Wigmore, John H., “St. Ives, Patron Saint of Lawyers,” 5 Fordham Law Review 401 (1936). Saint Yves’ life, bibliography, hagiography, and manuscript tradition are all available at SurPECIAResources in Medievalism (in French).

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: St. Ives (Yves)

Please consider making a donation to New Advent in order to receive the complete contents of this website as an immediate download. A single purchase of $19.99 provides access to the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa Theologica, Bible, and other resources. (From St. Yves) St. Ives was born on October 17, 1253, at Kermartin, near Tréguier, Brittany, and died on May 19, 1303, at Louannec, Brittany. He was the son of Helori, lord of Kermartin, and Azo du Kenquis. Upon his graduation from the University of Paris in 1267, Ives was appointed to the court of the city of Paris.

After returning to Brittany and receiving minor orders, he was named “official,” orecclesiastical judge, of the archdeanery of Rennes(1280); in the meantime, he studiedScripture, and there are good reasons to believe that he eventually joined the Franciscan Tertiaries at Guingamp.

When it came to the performance of his duties, he demonstrated great courage and rectitude, and he did not hesitate to oppose the unjust taxation of the king, which he considered an encroachment on the rights of the Church; through his charitable works, he earned the titles of advocate and patron of the poor.

He was buried at Tréguier and canonized by Clement VI in 1347, with his feast day being celebrated on May 19th.

“Sanctus Ivo erat Brito, Advocatus et non latro, Res miranda populo,” it is stated, yet he is not the model for attorneys since — “Sanctus Ivo erat Brito, Advocatus et non latro, Res miranda populo.”

Sources

DANIEL,Monuments originaux(St-Brieux, 1887); Acta SS. (May), V, 248; Lifeby DE LA HAYE (Morlaix 1623); and by NORBERT (Paris 1892); Analecta Bolland (II, 324-40; VIII, 201-3); XVII, 259.

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About this page

Citation in the APA style (1910). St. Ives is a small town in Cornwall. It may be found in the Catholic Encyclopedia. The Robert Appleton Company is based in New York. citation. Andrew MacErlean is the author of this work. “St. Ives” is an abbreviation for “St. Ives.” The Catholic Encyclopedia, 8th edition. The Robert Appleton Company published this book in New York in 1910. Approval from the ecclesiastical authorities There isn’t a hindrance in sight. The first day of October, 1910. Censor: Remy Lafort, S.T.D., Imprimatur: John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York, +Imprimatur: John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York Information about how to get in touch with us.

Email is webmasteratnewadvent.org, and I may be reached @ that address.

St. Ives

His birthplace was Kermartin, near Tréguier, in Brittany, on October 17, 1253. He was the son of Helori, lord of Kermartin, and Azo du Kenquis, who married Helori’s sister, Azo du Kenquis. Ives was sent to the University of Paris in 1267, where he finished with a degree in civil law. He then moved on to the University of Orléans in 1277, where he pursued a degree in canon law. After returning to Brittany and receiving minor orders, he was appointed as the “official,” or ecclesiastical judge, of the archdeanery of Rennes, which he held until his death (1280).

  • Later, he was invited by the Bishop of Tréguier to join his “official” court, and he accepted the invitation in 1284.
  • Ives earned the label of “champion and patron of the destitute” as a result of his charitable work.
  • Eight years later, he was transferred to the parish of Louannee, where he died on May 19, 1303.
  • “Sanctus Ivo erat Brito, Advocatus et non latro, Res miranda populo,” it is stated, yet he is not the model for attorneys since — “Sanctus Ivo erat Brito, Advocatus et non latro, Res miranda populo.”

Saint Yves of Brittany

The feast day of Saint Yves of Brittany (Saint Yves de Bretagne) is celebrated on May 19. In 1253, Yves, sometimes known as Ivo, was born in Brittany to wealthy parents. The values his religious mother imparted in the boy’s heart via Christian instruction helped to keep him safe during his student years in Paris and Orleans, when he was exposed to some of the most dangerous situations imaginable. With the study of theology came the study of civil and ecclesiastical law, which Yves added to his repertoire.

  1. His church attendance included not only attending holy Mass in the morning, but also performing his devotions there in the evening on a daily basis.
  2. He did not use alcohol, and his favorite hobby was to pay visits to the sick in hospitals.
  3. Despite the fact that Yves, in his humility, did not express a wish or beg for it, the bishop of Treguier ordained him a priest and entrusted him with the care of a parish in his honor.
  4. He did not get this insight just from his education; rather, he prayed frequently and hoped earnestly for illumination.
  5. It was his choice to assist the poor, women widows, and children orphans in their quest for justice, even when the responsibility of his job did not require him to do so.
  6. The lofty post with which Yves had been entrusted, as well as the accolades that had been bestowed upon him as a result, were not to his liking.
  7. Yves kept things as basic as possible in his home and in his attire, and it showed.

He worked tirelessly to eliminate long-standing vices, particularly usury and immorality, and he was successful in his efforts thanks to his enthusiasm, generosity, holy example, and fervent prayers.

His home served as an open guesthouse for the impoverished, the blind, the lame, and the helpless from all across the surrounding area.

During a famine, God the Almighty came to the aid of his generous people by performing tangible miracles.

He once fed two hundred hungry people with seven loaves of bread, and another time he fed twenty-four people with a little loaf of bread, all with the help of volunteers.

He was just fifty years old when he became aware that his life was coming to an end.

In the cathedral of Treguier, his remains were laid to rest.

St.

according to the Franciscan Book of Saints, compiled by Fr. Marion Habig, OFM Page Dedicated to the Traditional Franciscan Calendar may be found here. To return to the Saints Page, click here. Return to the Saints of the Roman Catholic Church page.

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Saint of the day: Ives

St. Ives was born on October 17, 1253, in Kermartin, near Tréguier, in the province of Brittany. He was the son of Helori, the ruler of Hermartin, and Azo du Kenquis, and the grandson of Azo du Kenquis. Ives was sent to the University of Paris in 1267, where he studied civil law, and then to the University of Orléans in 1277, where he pursued a degree in canon law. On his return to Brittany, he found that he had been given minor orders and that he had been named the “official,” or ecclesiastical judge, for the archdeanery of Rennes.

  1. After his assignment at Rennes, there is evidence that he may have joined the Franciscan Tertiaries at some point in his career.
  2. Ives was steadfast in his convictions and did not hesitate to oppose unfair taxes by the king, which he saw as an infringement on the rights of the Catholic Church.
  3. In 1347, Pope Clement VI declared St.
  4. He is known as the “Patron Saint of Attorneys.”

Saint Yves

Fast, concise facts and information about Saint YvesThe following provides fast and concise facts and information:
  • Lawyers and attorneys are patronized by this customer. Memorial Day / Feast Day: May 19th
  • Born: 17th October 1253 in Kermartin, Brittany
  • Died: 17th October 1253 in Kermartin, Brittany
  • Memorial Day / Feast Day: May 19th Natural causes of death were the cause of Saint Yves’ death, which occurred in the year 1303.
Who or what is Saint Yves the patron saint of?Saint Yves is the patron of Lawyers. Meanings, definition and origins – a patron is considered to be a defender of a specific group of people or of a nation. There is a patron for virtually every cause, profession or special interest. Prayers are considered more likely to be answered by asking a patron for intercession on their behalf.The Story and History of Saint YvesThe story and history of Saint Yves.Yves, or Ivo, was born on 17th October 1253 at Kermartin, Brittany in France, the son of Helori, a wealthy nobleman. He had a wealthy, privileged background and received and excellent education. He attended the University of Paris graduating in civil law and to Orleans where he studied canon law. He attended the University of Paris graduating in civil law and to Orleans where he studied canon law. Yves, or Ivo, became a successful lawyer and judge famous for defending the poor without charge. He was ordained in 1284 and 1287 eneded his legal career to become a preacher. Yves, or Ivo, died on 19th May 1303 at Louannec, Brittany.Death of Saint YvesThere are two categories of saints: martyrs and confessors. A Christian martyr is regarded as one who is put to death for his Christian faith or convictions. Confessors are people who died natural deaths. Date of Death: Saint Yves died in A.D. 1303. Cause of Death: Natural Causes.Why is Saint Yves the patron of Lawyers?Why is Saint Yves is the patron of Lawyers? Because he was learned in canon and civil law.How Saint Yves is represented in Christian ArtIt is helpful to be able to recognise Saint Yves in paintings, stained glass windows, illuminated manuscripts, architecture and other forms of Christian art. The artistic representations reflect the life or death of saints, or an aspect of life with which the person is most closely associated. Saint Yves is represented in Christian Art as a Doctor of Laws holding a paper in his hand.Feast Day of Saint YvesThe Feast Day of Saint Yves is May 19th. The origin of Feast Days: most saints have specially designated feast days and are associated with a specific day of the year and these are referred to as the saint’s feast day. The feast days first arose from the very early Christian custom of the annual commemoration of martyrs on the dates of their deaths at the same time celebrating their birth into heaven.

Saint Yves of Brittany, Confessor – REGINA Magazine LLC

The 19th of May Saint Yves of Brittany is commemorated on this day every year. Ora pro nobis, as they say in Latin. In 1253, Yves (Ivo of Kermartin) was born in Brittany to aristocratic parents (Ivo was the son of Helori, lord of Kermartin, and Azo du Kenquis). He was the son of Helori, lord of Kermartin, and Azo du Kenquis. The values his religious mother imparted in the boy’s heart via Christian instruction helped to keep him safe during his student years in Paris and Orleans, when he was exposed to some of the most dangerous situations imaginable.

(1) In addition to studying his textbooks, he enjoyed reading the lives of the saints, and the reading compelled him to want to be like them.

(1) Upon his return to Brittany, he was appointed as a judge of the Rennes diocesan court, and afterwards as a judge of his home diocese, Treguier, where he earned the nickname “the poor man’s advocate” for his defense of the poor and his unwillingness to take payments from those who needed his help.

  • (2) Yves kept things as basic as possible in his home and in his clothes, and this included his furniture.
  • He worked tirelessly to eliminate long-standing vices, particularly usury and immorality, and he was successful in his efforts thanks to his enthusiasm, generosity, holy example, and fervent prayers.
  • His home served as an open guesthouse for the impoverished, the blind, the lame, and the helpless from all across the surrounding area.
  • During a famine, God the Almighty came to the aid of his generous people by performing tangible miracles.
  • He once fed two hundred hungry people with seven loaves of bread, and another time he fed twenty-four people with a little loaf of bread, all with the help of volunteers.
  • He was just fifty years old when he became aware that his life was coming to an end.
  • In the cathedral of Treguier, his remains were laid to rest.

St. Yves of Brittany was elevated to sainthood by Pope Clement VI in the wake of several miracles performed at his tomb. (1) Saint Ivo is shown here (3)

Cormish Riviera Holidays

The town of St Ives draws its name from St Ia, an Irish princess and missionary who lived in the 16th century. During the 5th Century, according to tradition, St Ia traveled from Ireland to Cornwall on a leaf. St Ia constructed an oratory on the location that is today occupied by the St Ives Parish Church. Construction of the church began during the reign of King Henry V in the early 1400s and was completed in 16 years, with the building being dedicated in 1434 after 16 years of work. Historically, St Ives was a tiny town that thrived on the traditional businesses of mining and fishing.

  1. At order to power mine engines, which landed in the harbour and unloaded coal into horse-drawn carts, coal was required.
  2. This is the location of the new leisure center as well as the main parking lot.
  3. The local fishing business was centered on capturing pilchards, and at its peak, there were over 300 boats working in the area, collecting millions of fish per season.
  4. They were a favorite meal to eat on Fridays and during Lent, when meat was not permitted to be consumed in this country.
  5. The monument is dedicated to John Knill, who served as Mayor of St Ives in 1767 before relocating to London in the following year.
  6. A custom that began in St Ives five years ago, when 10 local girls danced for a quarter of an hour around the mausoleum to the music of the hymn “All persons that dwell on Earth do dwell,” was established thanks to the generosity of John Knill.
  7. A goal to capture the spirit of our magnificent and rugged South West brought J M W Turner to St Ives in 1811.
  8. His paintings served as an inspiration for hundreds of people to make the same trek to St Ives in pursuit of the same pink light, and he was instrumental in the establishment of the thriving and important art colony known as St Ives.
  9. GWR made significant investments in the tourist industry, promoting the Cornish Riviera and purchasing the Tregenna Castle hotel in St Ives to provide as a convenient location to stay for visitors.
  10. In succeeding years, artists such as Peter Lanyon, Patrick Heron, and Wilhelmina Bans-Graham helped to keep that reputation alive.
  11. Barbara Hepworth died in 1975.

Because the gallery had an average of 240,000 visitors each year, permission was given in 2013 to expand the display area. Tate St Ives reopened on 14th October 2017 following a £20 million addition and restoration that took place over a period of many months.

St Ives Archive

St Ives Road, Carbis Bay, St Ives. TR26 2SF -01736 796408 Wesley Methodist Church, Carbis Bay, St Ives A wealth of material was gathered on every element of the town’s distinctive history and inhabitants, including newspaper articles and maps as well as legal papers, letters, catalogs and brochures as well as books, sound recordings, pictures, and genealogy data. If you have a question or need assistance with your research, the St Ives Archive is maintained by volunteers who have specialized knowledge to assist you, whether it be a simple enquiry or a major research effort.

Golden Legend – Life of Saint Ives

Saint Ives’s footsteps are here to be found. Ives was born in the diocese of Trygvier in small Britain, engendered or borne of aristocratic Catholic parents, and it was revealed to his mother in her dream that he would be canonized. In his early years, he was in excellent health and attended church services with reverence and devotion, listening attentively to the teachings and the congregation. Much of his time was spent studying the holy letters diligently and reading the lives of the saints with great interest, and he exerted himself greatly with all of his strength in order to follow them, and as a result, he became adorned with right great wisdom and renowned as being full of great science both in right civil and incanon law, and also in theology, which was well lettered as it appearedsith, as well in contemplation and judgment, as giving counsel to souls upon the After having taken up and exercised the art of advocacy in the bishop’s court of Trygvier in a holily and devoutly manner, always pleading the causes of the miserable and poor, exposing himself to it with his good gree, and not being required by them for to defend their questions and differences, he was chosen into the office of the official, first in the court of the archdeacon of Rennes, and afterwards in the same court of the bishop of Trygvier.

  • He was He aided those who were oppressed and those who had done wrong, and to each and every one of them he rendered his own by right, without accepting or accepting money, nor accepting any other benefit in return.
  • He was made and ordained in the order ofpriesthood, and so he celebrated and heard the confessions of his parishioners with great humility, devoutness, and diligence.
  • He profited continually, rushing from virtue to virtue, and was pleasing to both God and the world, to the extent that the people were loath to part with his words and his fellowship, and those who saw him were greatly astonished by his pleasant demeanor and his extraordinary holiness.
  • Wow, what a miracle he was of excellent or magnificent humility, which he displayed over everything in his habit or attire, in deed and speech, and while traveling and being in various groups of people.
  • And by the time he died, he had worn nothing except coarse fabric, either russet or white, that he had learned to wear from the poor people of the countryside.
  • And he had no dominion over those who ate with him; instead, he drew near to him the most disfigured and unhappy of those who ate with him.
  • He knelt before the altar, crying and piteously groaning, every time he was about to celebrate his mass, and he shed many tears as he did so, running down his face as he did so.

And, without a doubt, he endured all insults and blasphemy with great patience, for when folks mocked him or talked bad to him, he said nothing, but keeping his thoughts on God, he bore their foul words patiently and with great delight.

He didn’t say anything tumelous or contumelious, or anything else that would be considered disordinate.

And how is it that, despite the fact that the sergeant was about to obtain it, men feared and predicted that tremendous bad or damage would result as a result, both to Saint Ives and to the church, no harm or damage happened as a result of the event, neither to the saint nor to the church?

He was always preoccupied with wealth in accordance with the doctrine of the apostles.

He set right the word of virtue and truth, and, shunning all empty words, he spoke only sparingly and painfully, save for the words of God and of redemption, which were eternal.

As a result, he returned to his home after this arduous labor fasting, vowing that he would never again allow anybody to dine with him in order to maintain his abstinence tradition.

This happened not long after, since the meschant hermit, having abandoned the path of redemption and penitence, walked out of his cell and along a worldly and damnable path.

The great charity, pity, and misericorde that he had towards the poor, indigent, and suffretous, towards the widows, and towards the poor children, both fatherless and motherless, throughout his life cannot be recounted, nor has it ever been witnessed in our time, nor has it ever been seen in our time.

Also, before he changed his way of life, he prepared plenty of meat to be dressed and ready for eating on the great and solemn holidays, and at dinner-time he called and caused to be called the poor folk to dinner, and to them administered meat with his own hands, and after, he ate with two poor children whom he had sustained at school for the love of our Lord Jesu Christ, for he had always been right courteous to children, both father- and motherless, and as their father He re-entered the scene with dignity and courtesy for the impoverished naked of our Lord.

  • A robe and a hood of similar fabric were made for him to wear, and he donated them to a poor man since he cared more about the destitute nude than he cared about his own body.
  • Wherever he went, the suffretous and impoverished, who flocked to him from every direction, trailed after him, knowing that whatever he had was at their disposal as if it were their own.
  • A poor guy once came up against him, and he, having nothing available to give him at the time, took his hood and handed it to the said poor man, and then went home without a hair on his head.
  • Whenever he was tired from study, orisons, or traveling, he was forced to sleep on the ground, and when he did, he used his book or a stone as a cushion instead of a pillow.
  • The only meat he had was brown bread and oatmeal, which he ate with cold water, and he survived on this diet for eleven years, during which time he did not consume any other food.

Apart from that, he fasted three days per week with bread and water, which were Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday; and on the other days he ate only once a day, with bread and pottage, as follows, with the exception of Sundays, Christmasday, Easterday, Whitsunday, and All Hallows’ day on which days he ate twice a day (except for the latter two days of the week).

  1. He never had a sip of wine in the fourteen years leading up to his death, except at mass, after which he had received the body and blood of our Lord, or occasionally when he dined with the bishop, for he would put a drop or two of wine into his water just to change the color of the water.
  2. St.
  3. A little and bad coverlet was wrapped around him three days before his death, saying that he was unworthy of any other parements.
  4. He refused all other things and was only covered with a little and bad coverlet.
  5. He was taken up into heaven in the year of grace thirteen hundred and three, on the nineteenth day of May (which was the Sunday following the Ascension of our Lord Jesu Christ), and he was taken into heaven as if he had been sleeping, without any sign or token of any dolour.

According to the record of his life and virtues, which has been long since made and completed, it was at his invocation by vows and prayers, by some devoutly made unto God, and to the Saint in various places that fourteen dead were raised, with two children living within their mother’s womb and dead before their baptism, which sithe received life, being counted always in the said number.

  1. Thirteen contracts, or ones that were filled with paralysis, were restored to good health by the same person.
  2. Diverse people were gathered in ten locations and saved from drowning in the sea by securing their belongings.
  3. The health of another who had a stone the size of an egg and genitors the size of a man’s head was restored to him.
  4. A woman whose paps were stuffed full of milk because the milk desired to be there.
  5. Two deaf children and a slew of others who had lost their ability to talk were restored to their ability to communicate.
  6. The fire, which had been started in three different locations, was quenched and put out, and both men, women, and children, as well as goods, were kept from catching fire without being hurt or damaged in any way.
  7. As well as the saint himself distributing foison alms, the corn that has multiplied in his garret, and the bread that he occasionally holds in his hand Many sick people have been cured of various illnesses and deformities simply by coming into contact with his hood.
  8. On a time, when the said saint performed mass, as he celebrated and lifted up the body of our Lord, a great resplendor shone about it, which soon after the elevation was done, withdrew and fled away.
  9. In time of a vast flood or flowing, which filled the streets and places, the sign of the cross made with the said holy man’s hand on the water it paused and ebbed away.
  10. On a time when he had given all his bread to poor folks, loaves of bread were brought to him enough to suffice him and the needy people in his company withal, by a woman unknown, the which after her present provided, went away and never was seen after.

The said archbishop was restored to life, sight, and good health as a result of the invocation or calling to Saint Ives made for his salvation by his parents and friends, accompanied by weepings, vows, and devotions, by the grace and virtue of him of whom it is written that he enlumineth the eyes, giveth life, health, and blessing, light, sapience, for which God, creator, enlightener, and savior be thanked Amen.

Saint of the Day – 19 May – St Ivo of Kermartin (1253-1303) “Advocate of the Poor”

Saint Ives’s footsteps are here to be seen! Saint Ives was born in Little Britain, in the diocese of Trygvier, engendered or borne of noble and catholic parents, and it was revealed to his mother while she slept that he would be sanctified. In his early years, he was in excellent health, and he went to church on a regular basis, listening attentively to the sermons and the congregational singing. Much of his time was spent studying the holy letters diligently and reading the lives of the saints with great interest, and he exerted himself greatly with all of his strength in order to follow them, and as a result, he became adorned with right great wisdom and renowned full of great science both in right civil and incanon law, and also in theology, which was well lettered as it appearedsith, as well in contemplation and judgment, as well as giving counsel to souls upon the Because, after he had occupied and exercised much holily and devoutly the fait of advocacy in the bishop’s court of Trygvier, always pleading the causes of the miserable and poor persons without taking any salary, exposing himself to it with his good gree, and not being required by them for to defend their questions and differences, he was chosen into the office of the official, first in the court of the archdeacon of Rennes, and afterwards in the said court of the bishop of He came to the aid of those who had been oppressed or who had done wrong, and to each and every one of them, he rendered his own by right, without accepting any money from them or accepting anything else in exchange.

The which then, called to the government and guiding of souls, carried always with him the Bible and his breviary or portos, and so he, made and ordained in the order ofpriesthood, celebrated as if every day, and heard much humbly, devoutly, and dilgently the confessions of his parishioners.

Because of his friendly manner and wonderful holiness, he profited continuously, busily advancing from virtue to virtue, and he was a pleasant presence before God and the world, to such an extent that the populace was loath to part with his words and his fellowship, and those who came across him were greatly astonished.

It was he who spoke to the people, both sweetly and harshly, and who stood with his back to the earth, his hood over his face, saying that he should not be appreciated by the people and that he should avoid all vanity.

When the poor washed their hands, he held the ewer and also the towel, and then delivered to them the meat that they should eat with his own hands, and laying himself on the ground, he ate with them from the said meal, which consisted primarily of brown bread and occasionally a little pottage, Moreover, he had no control over the people who ate with him; instead, he drew near to him the most disfigured and destitute.

  1. A small amount of straw served as his bedding, sheets, coverlet, and hooks for hanging for his whole night on the ground.
  2. He kneeled down before the altar, crying and piteously groaning, every time he was about to conduct his mass, and several times throughout the service, tears streamed down his cheeks.
  3. His suffering was unquestionably full of patience, as evidenced by the fact that when folks mocked him or shouted ill things to him, he did not respond in kind, but kept his gaze fixed upon the Lord and bore their insults patiently and with great delight.
  4. His statements were neither tumelous nor contumelious, nor did he say anything else that was insubordinate.
  5. And how is it that, despite the fact that the sergeant was about to obtain it, men feared and predicted that tremendous evil or damage would result as a result, both to Saint Ives and to the church, no harm or damage happened as a result of the event, neither to the saint nor to the church.
  6. The apostles’ doctrine was his constant source of interest and he never strayed from that.
  7. And, abandoning all empty words in the process, spoke only sparingly and painfully, with the exception of the words of God and of redemption, which he viewed as right from the beginning.
  8. As a result, he returned to his home after this arduous labor fasting, vowing that he would never again allow anybody to dine with him in order to maintain his abstinence norm.
  9. This happened not long after, as the meschant hermit, having abandoned the path of redemption and penitence, walked out of his cell and along a worldly and damnable path.

The great charity, pity, and misericorde that he had towards the poor, indigent, and suffretous, towards the widows, and towards the poor children, both fatherless and motherless, throughout his life cannot be recounted, nor has it ever been witnessed in our time, nor has it ever been witnessed in any other time in human history.

He also made plenty of meat to be dressed and ready for eating on the great and solemn holidays, and at dinner-time he called and caused to be called the poor folk to dinner, to whom he administered meat with his own hands for the love of our Lord Jesus Christ, and afterwards he ate with two poor children whom he had sustained at school for the love of our Lord Jesus Christ, for he had always been right courteous to children, both father- and motherless, and as their father sent them to him, When our Lord was destitute and naked, he was treated with dignity by him.

  • A robe and a hood of similar material were made for him to wear, and he donated them to a poor man since he cared more about the destitute nude than he cared about his own body at the time.
  • Wherever he went, the suffretous and impoverished, who flocked to him from every direction, trailed after him, knowing that whatever he had was at their disposal as if it were theirs.
  • He also assisted in the burial with his own hands.
  • Having become so accustomed to being in orisons and prayers and studies that he spent the most of his time without sleep, both day and night, he punished his flesh with great vengeance.
  • In spite of the fact that he was working in the city of Trygvier, he had his hair pulled back and hidden beneath his shirt.
  • It was with bread and water that he fasted for the whole eleventh Lent as well as for all of our Lord’s Advents from the Ascension to Pentecost as well as for all ember days, all vigils of our Lady and of the apostles, and all other days set aside by holy church for fasting.

His bread was a rustical brown, made of barley or oats, and his pottage was made of great coles or other herbs or beans, or of radish root seasoned only with salt and no other liquor, except that he occasionally added a little flour and a little butter, and on Easterday, in addition to his usual pittance, he ate two eggs in addition to his usual pittance of one egg.

A seven-day fast without meat or drink was all he needed to be healthy, and he did it once in his life.

Ives, as previously stated, lived approximately fifty years, and during his last illness, he did not cease to teach those who were around him, and he preached unto them of their salvation; and, coming beneurely unto his last days, took humbly the sacraments of the body of our Lord and the last unction, Iying on his noble bed beforesaid, adjousted always to the same with great example of his friends, a small straw.

A tiny and terrible coverlet was wrapped about him three days before his death, indicating that he was unworthy of any more parements.

He had refused all other things.

He was taken up into heaven in the year of grace thirteen hundred and three, on the nineteenth day of May (which was the Sunday following the Ascension of our Lord Jesu Christ), and he was taken into heaven as if he had been asleep, without any sign or token of any dolour.

And at the invocation of the aforementioned Saint Ives, ten demoniacs, insane people, or those who were possessed with evil spirits were liberated from their forsenery or lunacy, as well as from all evil spirits in their possession.

It was him who brought three blind people to light.

I was able to treat one who was fully hydropic or filled with dropsy totally.

After three falls from the gallows, one who had been sentenced to death was released and allowed to die in peace.

Two deaf children and a slew of others who had lost the ability to talk were restored to their ability to communicate.

The fire, which had been started in three different locations, was quenched and put out, and no one, including men, women, and children, or property, was injured or harmed in any way.

When the saint himself is delivering foison alms, the grain multiplies in his garret, and the bread is in his hand at times, the scene is breathtaking.

A guy was dressing the wheel of his water-mill when suddenly the water began pouring down on him, and he begged the holy Saint Ives to save him from drowning, and he was saved very immediately.

After the carpenters prayed to the saint, a post ordained to the work or construction of a bridge that was not convenable to the said job because of a defect of half a foot in length was discovered to be long enough and convenable to the foregoing work.

When he donated his hood to a poor man, as previously said, and returned home bareheaded, God, who appeared in the shape or likeness of a poor man and received the said hood, as is believed, sent the said hood back to him, which was a wonderful and amazing miracle.

She then left without a trace.

The said archbishop was restored to life, sight, and good health as a result of the invocation or calling to Saint Ives made for his salvation by his parents and friends, accompanied by weeping, vows, and devotions, by the grace and virtue of him of whom it is written that he enlumineth the eyes, giveth life, health, and blessing, light, sapience, for which God, creator, enlightener, and savior be thanked, Amen.

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