Who Was Saint Bernard

Saint Bernard of Clairvaux

  • Learn about the life of Saint Bernard of Clairvaux by reading his writings. An overview of the life of St. Bernard of Clairvaux. Contunico is a trademark of ZDF Enterprises GmbH, Mainz. See all of the videos related to this topic. Discover the history of Clairvaux Abbey, as well as the origins of the Cistercian Order. Overview of Clairvaux Abbey in France, including a study of the Cistercian religious order. Contunico is a trademark of ZDF Enterprises GmbH, Mainz. See all of the videos related to this topic.

Seek out more information about the life and times of Saint Bernard of Clairvaux a brief summary of the life of St. Bernard of Clairvaux The ZDF Enterprises GmbH in Mainz is the company that created Contunico. You may watch all of the videos related to this post. Discover the history of Clairvaux Abbey, as well as the origins of the Cistercian Order. Overview of Clairvaux Abbey in France, including information on the Cistercian order. The ZDF Enterprises GmbH in Mainz is the company that created Contunico.

Early life and career

Learn about the life of Saint Bernard of Clairvaux by reading his letters. A brief summary of the life of St. Bernard of Clairvaux. Contunico is owned by ZDF Enterprises GmbH in Mainz. View all of the videos related to this topic. Discover the history of Clairvaux Abbey, as well as the origins of the Cistercian order. An overview of Clairvaux Abbey in France, as well as a description of the Cistercian order. Contunico is owned by ZDF Enterprises GmbH in Mainz. View all of the videos related to this topic.

Founder and abbot ofClairvaux

His appointment to head a small group of monks to construct a monastery at Clairvaux, on the boundary between Burgundy and Champagne, was made by King Harding in 1115. For more than a decade, the Clairvaux community, which included four brothers, an uncle, two cousins, an architect, and two experienced monks under the direction of Bernard, suffered from acute famine and misery. Meanwhile, as Bernard’s health deteriorated, his spirituality grew more intense and profound. Under the pressure of his ecclesiastical authorities and friends, particularly thebishop and scholarWilliam of Champeaux, he retreated to a cottage near the monastery and placed himself under the supervision of a quack physician.

  1. They are distinguished by the employment of parallels, etymologies, alliteration, and biblical symbols, as well as by the recurrence of allusions to the Church Fathers, and they are filled with resonance and lyrical brilliance.
  2. While he did not believe in Mary’s Immaculate Conception, Bernard would go on to become one of the most prominent supporters of a moderate worship of the Virgin in the Middle Ages.
  3. Bernard struggled and eventually learned to live with the inevitable conflict created by his desire to serve others in charity through obedience and his desire to cultivate his inner life by remaining in his monastic enclosure.
  4. His more than 300 letters and sermons document his struggle to reconcile a mystical life of immersion in God with compassion for the poor and a concern for the faithful performance of tasks as a custodian of the life of the church, all while maintaining a strong sense of humor.
  5. A sort of higher knowledge that is the complement and fulfilment of faith, and that comes to a close in prayer and contemplation, might be claimed by him as his claim.
  6. Stones and trees will teach you things that you will never be able to learn from masters.

These ideas were articulated in his sermons “The Steps of Humility” and “The Love of God.”

Saint Bernard of Clairvaux

The Life and Times of Saint Bernard of Clairvaux The greatest man of the century! She is the woman of the century! Today, similar words are given to so many people—”golfer of the century,” “composer of the century,” “right tackle of the century”—that the phrase has lost its meaning. Bernard of Clairvaux, on the other hand, was without a doubt and without argument Western Europe’s “man of the twelfth century.” Anyone who holds any of these titles would stand out among ordinary people: adviser to popes, preacher of the Second Crusade, protector of the faith, healer of schisms, reformer of a monastic Order, Scripture scholar, theologian, and orator.

  • Bernard left his home in the year 1111, when he was 20 years old, to become a member of the monastic community of Citeaux.
  • By the end of four years, the ailing community had regained enough vigor to build a new home in the neighboring valley of Wormwoods, with Bernard serving as abbot.
  • He learned to be more patient and understanding after experiencing a little health setback.
  • His abilities as an arbitrator and counselor gained widespread recognition.
  • In Rome, he appears to have trodden on some very delicate toes on a number of times.
  • However, in response to a letter of caution from Rome, he stated that the good fathers in Rome already had enough on their plates to keep the Church together.
  • Bernard was the one who interfered in a full-blown split and brought it to a conclusion in favor of the Roman pontiff and against the antipope not long after.
  • His rhetoric was so powerful that a large army was quickly raised, and the success of the crusade appeared to be certain.
  • Bernard thought he had some responsibility for the degenerative consequences of the Crusade in some manner.
  • Reflection Bernard’s involvement in the Church was far more active than we could have imagined conceivable at the time.
  • But he was well aware that they would have been in vain had he not spent countless hours in prayer and contemplation, which had provided him with strength and divine guidance.

His life was distinguished by a great devotion to the Blessed Mother, which he shared with others. His sermons and works on Mary remain the gold standard in the field of Marian theology.

St. Bernard of Clairvaux

A Biography of St. Bernard of Clairvaux Mr. Century is a man of distinction. She is the woman of the millennium. Today, similar designations are used to so many people—”golfer of the century,” “composer of the century,” “right tackle of the century,” and so on—that the phrase has lost its sting. Bernard of Clairvaux, on the other hand, was unquestionably Western Europe’s “man of the twelfth century,” regardless of debate or disagreement. Advisor to Popes, preacher of the Second Crusade, defender of the faith, schism healer and reformer, Scripture scholar and theologian, and orator: any one of these titles would set apart an average man from his contemporaries in the religious world.

  1. As a young man of twenty, Bernard left his family to become a member of the monastic community of Citeaux in the year 1111.
  2. A dying community had recovered enough vigor within four years to build a new house in the neighboring valley of Wormwoods, with Bernard serving as abbot.
  3. He learned to be more patient and understanding as a result of a little health setback.
  4. A great deal of attention was drawn to his abilities as an arbitrator and counselor.
  5. His actions in Rome appear to have caused considerable annoyance for a number of individuals.
  6. However, in response to a letter of caution from Rome, he stated that the good fathers in Rome already had enough on their plates to keep the Church together and running well.
  7. Bernard was the one who interfered in a full-blown split and brought it to a close in favor of the Roman pontiff and against the antipope a short time after that.
  8. It was because of his eloquence that a large army was gathered, and the success of the crusade appeared to be virtually certain.
  9. According to Bernard, the crusade had had a degenerative impact on the world, and he felt accountable in some manner for this.
  10. Reflection His involvement in the Church was far more active than we could ever believe imaginable in the modern world.
  11. His prayers and meditations, he realized, would have been in vain if he hadn’t spent countless hours in prayer and meditation, which had given him strength and divine guidance.

In his life, he was marked by a profound devotion to the Blessed Mother. Despite his passing, his sermons and works on Mary remain the gold standard of Marian theology today.

Further Reading on St. Bernard of Clairvaux

The book St. Bernard of Clairvaux Seen through His Selected Letters, translated with an introduction by Bruno Scott James and published in 1953, paints a vivid portrait of the saint in his many states of mind. Saint Bernard of Clairvaux is the subject of two excellent monographs: Watkin Williams’ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux (1935) and Bruno Scott James’ St. Bernard of Clairvaux: An Essay in Biography (1993). (1957). Geoffrey Webb and Adrian Walker compiled and transcribed accounts of St. Bernard written by his contemporaries, including William of St.

Bernard of Clairvaux: His Life and Times (1960).

Additional Biography Sources

‘St. Bernard of Clairvaux Seen through His Selected Letters,’ translated with an introduction by Bruno Scott James and published in 1953, paints a vivid portrait of the saint in his many states of mind. Saint Bernard of Clairvaux is the subject of two excellent monographs: Watkin Williams’ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux (1935) and Bruno Scott James’ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux: An Essay in Biography (1993). (1957). In St. Bernard of Clairvaux, Geoffrey Webb and Adrian Walker collected and translated accounts of St.

Thierry, Arnold of Bonnevaux, Geoffrey and Philip of Clairvaux, and Odo of Deuil (1960).

St. Bernard of Clairvaux – Saints & Angels

the Abbot and Doctor of the Church, Saint Bernard St. Bernard was born at the castle of Fontaines, near Dijon, in the French province of Burgundy, to wealthy parents. Under the supervision of his religious parents, he was sent at a young age to a college at Chatillon, where he distinguished himself for his extraordinary devotion and spirit of memory. It was here at this location that he began his studies in theology and Holy Scripture. Because he was afraid of the traps and temptations of the world after his mother’s death, he decided to join the Cistercian Order, which had just been created and was known for its austerity, and for which he was destined to become the most prominent adornment.

  1. Citeaux was the setting for St.
  2. Stephen, in 1113, which included thirty young noblemen from the region.
  3. Seeing the considerable progress he had made in the spiritual life, his superior ordered him and twelve monks to create a new monastery, which became known as the famed Abbey of Clairvaux a short while later.
  4. Bernard was chosen Abbot, and he started the active life that has distinguished him as the most prominent character in the history of the 12th century.
  5. A number of Bishoprics were offered to him, but he turned them all down.
  6. Bernard’s fame went far and wide, and even the Popeswere influenced by his counsel.
  7. In obedience to the Sovereign Pontiff, he journeyed across France and Germany, where he sparked the greatest excitement for the holy war among the general populace.

Despite the fact that the voyage failed, the saint did not blame himself, instead blaming the Crusaders for their misdeeds. St. Bernard was extraordinarily blessed with the ability to perform miracles. On August 20, 1153, he passed away. His feast day is celebrated on August 20th.

To all our readers,

Abbot and Doctor of the Church, St. Bernard. Bernard was born at the castle of Fontaines, near Dijon, in the French province of Burgundy to noble parents. He is known as St. Bernard. The young man was raised in the care of his religious parents and was educated in a college in Chatillon, France. While there, he stood out for his exceptional devotion and memory-stimulating attitude. Meanwhile, he began his studies in theology and Holy Scripture at the same location. Because he was afraid of the traps and temptations of the world after his mother’s death, he decided to join the Cistercian Order, which had just been created and was known for its austerity, and for which he was destined to become its most prominent adornment.

  1. Citeaux was the setting for St.
  2. Stephen, in 1113, which included thirty young noblemen from the city.
  3. His superior, seeing the significant progress he had made in the spiritual life, dispatched him and twelve other monks to create a new monastery, which became known as the celebratedAbbeyof Clairvaux shortly thereafter.
  4. Other monasteries were created by him, and he also wrote countless writings and traveled much in the name of Christ.
  5. Although his renown traveled far and wide, even the Popes sought his counsel from time to time.
  6. In obedience to the Sovereign Pontiff, he journeyed through France and Germany, where he sparked the greatest excitement for the holy war among the general public.
  7. The miracle-working abilities of St.
  8. In 1153, he passed away on August 20.
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Our Patron – Saint Bernard of Clairvaux 1090-1153 – St. Bernard of Clairvaux, Scottsdale, AZ

Founder of Clairvaux Abbey in Burgundy, Bernard was one of the most powerful Church leaders in Europe during the first half of the twelfth century. He was also considered to be one of the greatest spiritual masters of all time and the most powerful propagator of the Cistercian reform movement during this period. The abbot of the Abbey of Citeaux was born in Fontaines-les-Dijon in 1090 and entered the monastery in 1112, taking thirty of his family with him, including five of his brothers—his youngest brother and his widowed father followed a short time later.

  1. Stephen Harding.
  2. A series of sermons on the Annunciation was published by him when he was a young abbot.
  3. Thousands of people were drawn to Clairvaux and the other Cistercian monasteries as a result of Bernard’s spiritual writings and great personal charisma, which resulted in the establishment of several additional foundations.
  4. His Apologia, one of his most contentious and widely read books, was the result of this experience.
  5. The reigning powers of his day sought him out as a consultant and mediator, and he was successful.
  6. It took Bernard eight years of arduous travel and deft negotiation to achieve success.
  7. When his spiritual son was elected Pope in 1145, his political power grew exponentially.

Upon the orders of Emperor Eugene III, he preached the Second Crusade and dispatched massive forces on their way to Jerusalem. In his latter years, he arose from his sickbed and traveled to the Rhineland to defend Jews from a ruthless persecutory campaign against them.

Doctor of the Church

Bernard died on the 20th of August, 1153, in Clairvaux. On the 18th of January, 1174, Pope Alexander III declared him to be a saint. In 1830, Pope Pius VII named him a Doctor of the Church, the first Pope to do so. M. Basil Pennington wrote this piece. The acronym OCSO comes from the Modern Catholic Encyclopedia.

St. Bernard of Clairvaux

A year later, on August 20, 1153, Bernard passed away at Clairvaux. Alexander III declared him a saint on the 18th of January, 1174. His designation as a Doctor of the Church was bestowed upon him by Pope Pius VII in the year 1830. published under the direction of M. Basil Pennington A quotation from The Modern Catholic Encyclopedia on the Order of the Holy Spirit (OCSO).

St. Bernard in the Novitiate

St. Bernard has a lot to teach a young guy who wants to become a member of the monastery. Humility is one of the most significant lessons we can take away from him, and this is one of the most important things we can learn from him. We begin studying St. Bernard with his treatise On the Steps of Humility and Truth, which is essentially a reflection on Chapter Seven of the Rule of St. Benedict, early in the novitiate to address this. In a nutshell, St. Bernard teaches that humility is the honest acknowledgement of one’s own sins, which is what he calls “self-knowledge.” Because of this honest encounter with myself, I am forced to become humble; at the same time, St.

  • Because the more intensely I see my own flaws, the more clearly I am able to see past them to the outlines of what I am intended to be: the image of the Creator.
  • While humility entails an acknowledgement of my sins and, as a result, a certain level of unhappiness with myself, we should be quick to recognize that for St.
  • Humility and magnanimity go hand in hand; in fact, the latter is the logical outcome of the former in most cases.
  • Br.
  • On the contrary, the less we think we can do on our own, the more we begin to believe that God will use His strength to accomplish great things in and through us.
  • In other words, it is the humble person who recognizes that all good things are the result of God’s strength; and since God is our guarantee, we have no need to be anything other than confident and magnanimous in our actions.
  • It is necessary for repentant sinners to enroll in the school of love, which for Bernard implies first and foremost the community of a Cistercian monastery, in order to become that Bride of Christ.

The acceptance of one’s own misfortune, according to St.

Unlike the Pharisee in Jesus’ story, the humble man does not think of himself as superior to “the others” (cf.

He understands that he stands in solidarity with all of his fellow sinners, and it is precisely for this reason that he seeks to forgive and love them despite their flaws.

However, in order to have a sad heart as a result of someone else’s pain, you must first realize your own, in order to be able to detect your neighbor’s mind in your own and know how to heal him from inside yourself (The Steps of Humility 2-6).

Only in this way can we truly extend our own sentiments into “the other,” allowing us to sympathize with him and experience his pleasures and sorrows as if they were our own.

Joseph delivers a homily at the Mass for his Form’s students.

Bernard, the school of charity, which is the monastic community, is the finest place to develop compassion and love for one’s brothers.

He embraces the voluntas communis, or the will that is in agreement with the will of the brothers, and he accepts their will.

While traveling through this spiritual journey, Jesus is the way, serving as the source of forgiveness and transformation grace that allows the sinner to love his brothers and God; but he is also the destination, serving as the Bridegroom, welcoming the purified soul into the Bridal chamber of divine love.

Bernard of Clairvaux

A young guy who joins the monastery will learn a great deal from St. Bernard. Humility is one of the most significant lessons we can take away from him, and this is one of the most important lessons we can learn from anyone. We begin studying St. Bernard with his work On the Steps of Humility and Truth, which is essentially a reflection on Chapter Seven of the Rule of St. Benedict, early in the novitiate to address this issue in greater depth. In a nutshell, St. Bernard teaches that humility is the honest acknowledgement of one’s own sins, which is what he refers to as self-knowledge.

Bernard the beginning of his genuine understanding of God, even though this might be a traumatic experience.

For only the humble man is capable of properly meditating on the vast dignity of the human race; for only he has genuinely seen the imago Dei, since his humility has enabled him to see it despite the multitude of faults that would otherwise tarnish it.

Bernard humility has nothing to do with severe self-deprecation or pusillanimity, it does require an admission of my faults and, as a result, a certain level of unhappiness with oneself.

According to Bernard, Mary exemplifies the culmination of both qualities and the relationship between them the best: The fact that she regarded herself as a handmaid of little worth, notwithstanding her magnanimous trust in the promise, meant that she had no doubt about her election to this incomprehensible mystery, this marvelous exchange, and this incomprehensible sacrament, and believed that she would soon become the true mother of the God-man, which she had regarded herself as a handmaid of little worth (Sermon on the Octave of Assumption, 13).

  1. Playing with some second-year students is something Br.
  2. So true humility does not result in our becoming men of little faith, and magnanimity does not result in us becoming arrogant men of little faith.
  3. Contrary to popular belief, it is precisely because the humble man knows how little he is that he expects to get big things in life.
  4. Bernard exhorts even the most corrupt human being to place his or her faith in God’s overwhelming kindness, which will purify and raise him or her to the point of being a Bride for the Divine Bridegroom, Jesus Christ, or to the point of becoming a Bridegroom himself.

Community life is referred to as a “school of love” because it is in community—in the daily ins and outs of a life filled with the fruits and challenges of close human relationships—that we are invited to acknowledge our own faults and to accept our brothers in spite of their own faults and shortcomings.

  1. Bernard, is what makes it possible for the humble man to embrace his fellow men and to become more intimate with them through love and compassion.
  2. Luke 18:9-14).
  3. In their need for God’s compassion, they are all united: Having a wretched heart makes a brother’s pain that much more real.
  4. This is the first step toward having a wretched heart due to someone else’s unhappiness (The Steps of Humility 2-6).
  5. Only in this way can we truly extend our own sentiments into “the other,” allowing us to empathize with him and experience his pleasures and sorrows as if they were our own sensations.
  6. Joseph’s sermon from his Form’s class during their weekly Mass!
  7. Bernard, the school of charity, which is the monastic community, is the finest place to develop compassion and love for the brothers.
  8. In his embrace of the voluntas communis, or the will that is in unison with the brothers’, he expresses his commitment to the brothers.

While traveling through this spiritual journey, Jesus is the way, serving as the source of forgiveness and transformation grace that allows the sinner to love his brothers and God; but he is also the destination, serving as the Bridegroom who embraces the purified soul and welcomes her into the divine love’s Bridal Chamber.

Bernard of Clairvaux

St. Bernard has a lot to teach a young guy who wants to become a monk. One of the most significant lessons we can take away from him is the importance of humility. We begin studying St. Bernard with his work On the Steps of Humility and Truth, which is essentially a reflection on Chapter Seven of the Rule of St. Benedict, very early in the novitiate. In a nutshell, St. Bernard teaches that humility is the honest acceptance of oneself in all of one’s faults. For St. Bernard, this honest encounter with oneself necessarily results in humility, but at the same time, this often terrible experience serves as a stepping stone toward actual knowledge of God.

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One who may properly mediate on this enormous dignity of the human race is the humble man; because only he has truly seen the imago Dei, for his humility has allowed him to see it despite the multitude of sins that would otherwise tarnish it.

Bernard humility has nothing to do with severe self-deprecation or pusillanimity, it does require an admission of my faults and, as a result, a certain level of unhappiness with myself.

According to Bernard, Mary exemplifies the culmination of both qualities and the relationship between them the most clearly: She was so humble in her own estimation, yet so magnanimous in her faith in the promise, that she, who had regarded herself as a handmaid of little worth, had no doubts about her election for this incomprehensible mystery, for this marvelous exchange, and for this incomprehensible sacrament, and she believed that she would soon become the true mother of the God-man (Sermon on the Octave of Assumption, 13).

  • Br.
  • On the contrary, the less we think we can achieve on our own, the more we begin to believe that God will use His strength to accomplish great things in us.
  • In other words, it is the humble person who recognizes that all good things are the result of God’s strength; and since God is our guarantee, we have no reason to be anything other than confident and magnanimous in our faith.
  • The only way for repentant sinners to become that Bride of Christ is for them to enroll in the school of love, which for Bernard implies first and foremost the community of a Cistercian monastery.
  • According to St.
  • In Jesus’ story, the humble man does not elevate himself above “the others,” as the Pharisee does (cf.
  • Knowing that he stands in solidarity with all of his fellow sinners, he longs to forgive and love them despite their flaws.

However, in order to have a sad heart as a result of someone else’s pain, you must first realize your own, in order to be able to detect your neighbor’s mind in your own and know how to assist him (The Steps of Humility 2-6).

Only in this way can we truly extend our own sentiments into “the other,” allowing us to empathize with him and experience his pleasures and sorrows as if they were our own.

Joseph gives a sermon at the Mass for his Form’s class.

Bernard, the school of charity, which is the monastic community, is the finest place to cultivate compassion and love for one’s brothers.

Affiliation with the voluntas communis, or the will that is in line with that of the brothers, is important to him.

On this spiritual journey, Jesus is the path, the source of forgiving and transforming grace that enables the sinner to love his brothers and God; and he is also the destination, the Bridegroom who embraces the pure soul and welcomes her into the Bridal chamber of divine love.

Timeline

1054 East-West Split
1066 Conquest of England by William, Duke of Normandy
1077 Emperor submits to pope over investiture
1090 Bernard of Clairvaux born
1153 Bernard of Clairvaux dies
1173 Waldensian movement begins

However, one thing is certain: 400 years after his death, he was still regularly mentioned by both Catholics and Protestants, both of whom claimed to have his endorsement. Between Gregory the Great and the 1500s, John Calvin believed him to be the most important witness to truth. And now, his writings continue to lead spiritual lives not just of the order he founded, the Cistercians, but also of men and women from all walks of life, including those who are not Cistercians.

Austere leader

A family of lower nobility raised Bernard on the outskirts of Dijon in Burgundy, where he was born. His parents were both role models of integrity, but it was his mother who had the most effect on him as a child (some speculate only second to what Monica had done for Augustine of Hippo). Her death, which occurred in 1107, marked the beginning of Bernard’s “long journey toward total conversion.” Bernard sought the advice of the abbot of Citeaux, Stephen Harding, and opted to join his struggling, small, fledgling community known as the Cistercians, which was in its early stages of development.

  • As a result of Bernard’s admiration for the order, he convinced not only his brothers, but also around 25 additional individuals to join him at Citeaux in 1112.
  • It took him just three years after entering the order to be appointed as abbot of the third Cistercian abbey, which was located at Clairvaux.
  • “The cooks prepare everything with such skill and cunning that the four or five dishes previously devoured are no barrier to what is to follow, and the hunger is not limited by satiety,” he wrote, mocking the eating habits of other monks.
  • In response to the dangers of spiritual arrogance, Jesus stated, “There are persons who dress in tunics and have nothing to do with furs, but who lack humility despite the fact that they are dressed in tunics.
  • By 1118, Clairvaux had been able to establish its first daughter house, which was the first of around 70 Cistercian monasteries built by Bernard (which, in turn, created another 100 monasteries during Bernard’s lifetime).

World monk

Bernard’s authority and responsibilities rose in tandem with the growth of the order. His desire to live in isolation (he had previously been a hermit) was overshadowed by his being thrown into society for the most of the remaining years of his life. Bernard enjoyed cordial ties with other reforming orders of his day, such as the Carthusians and the Premonstratensians, with whom he shared a same goal. He also penned the Rule of the Knights Templar, a new order of knights who took monastic vows and promised to protect the Holy Land militarily.

  • Upon reading Peter Abelard’s “It is through questioning that we come to seek and by inquiring that we achieve truth,” and the suggestion that Christ died not to pay a punishment but only to express God’s love, Bernard was appalled and outraged.
  • ‘I was created a sinner by deriving my existence from Adam; I am made just by being cleansed in Christ’s blood and not by his ‘words and example,” he said of the Parisian, who he labeled a “son of perdition” who “disdains and scoffed” at the death of Christ.
  • Bernard’s informal political influence grew even stronger once Pope Eugenius III, a former student of Bernard’s, was elected to the Roman Catholic Church.
  • Eugenius was also admonished by him at the same time “In other words, you have been entrusted with the care of the planet rather than being handed possession of it.

During his travels around Europe, Bernard called on men to join him in the “cause of Christ.” The following is a quote from one of his sermons: “I implore and encourage you not to place your personal interests ahead of the interests of Christ.” However, as a result of squabbling and weak leadership, the crusade was a catastrophe, culminating in a humiliating retreat, and Bernard’s image suffered for the next four years.

Nonetheless, he was revered to the point of being canonized only a little more than two decades after his death.

Mystic pen

More than his reformist zeal and crusade preaching, Bernard is renowned today for his mystical writings, which are considered to be his crowning achievement. One of his most well-known works is On Loving God, in which he explains his aim right at the start: “You’d want me to explain why and how God should be loved, and I understand. My response is that God himself is the reason why he should be cherished.” His second big literary legacy isSermons on the Song of Songs, a collection of 86 sermons on the spiritual life that, in reality, barely indirectly touch on the text of the Song of Songs.

Finally, there are people that desire to know in order to benefit themselves, and this is a wise course of action to take.

Memorial of Saint Bernard of Clairvaux

The 20th of August is Memorial Day. White is the liturgical color, and the patron is white. Founder of the Cistercian Order, patron saint of beekeepers and candlemakers He was a reformer par excellence, and he was instrumental in saving the Benedictine Order and reviving monasticism. This day’s saint was comparable to a medieval rock star who never ceased travelling around Europe. The crème of society was among his circle of acquaintances, since he traveled with an entourage and drew large audiences to every event he appeared at.

  1. He was almost as prolific a writer as Saint Augustine, although he wrote mostly in letters rather than huge volumes, which was more his style.
  2. He was knowledgeable, full of emotion, erudite, strong, and introspective in his delivery.
  3. Pope Pius XII referred to him as “the last of the Fathers” of the Church, and he was right.
  4. His despair was exacerbated by the loss of his mother, and he began to think more seriously about what God intended him to do.
  5. A new monastery was established in the town of Cîteaux with the hopes of adhering to the Benedictine Rule with exactitude and severity.
  6. He entered this new, experimental monastery.
  7. At the entrance, he was greeted by a long procession of thirty of his siblings, relatives, and friends, all of whom were noble.

They were the ones who followed.

When he inquired, they responded affirmatively, using the word “yes.” This innate ability to command and lead was a foreshadowing of what was to follow.

Bernard was appointed Abbot of Clairvaux, which means “Clear Valley,” because of the influx of monks that resulted as a result of Bernard’s energizing presence at Cîteaux.

During his tenure as the first Abbot of Clairvaux, Bernard imprinted the Cistercian movement with its particular character: sobriety in art and architecture, solemnity in liturgy, austerity in living, tenacity in labor, rigorous adherence of the Rule, and quiet permeating everything.

By the time of Bernard’s death, there were 343 Cistercian monasteries spread over the length and width of European territory.

His abilities were such that he was sought out by princes, monarchs, and popes for advice on every conceivable topic.

As if he were a minister of state, he was forced to recruit secretaries to keep track of the enormous amount of communication that poured out of his mouth at all times.

He was greeted by throngs of people who came to obtain his blessing or to feel his palms pressing against their skulls.

The true miracle, according to one observer, was not his recovery, but rather the fact that Bernard survived.

Known for his Marian devotion, eloquence, and contemplative attitude in the Divine Comedy, Bernard takes the place of Beatrice as Dante completes the final stages of his mythological journey toward God.

The Virgin is the Queen of this mysterious white rose, and “loyal Bernard” looks at her with awe and respect as he holds her in his arms.

Let us consider you, Saint Bernard, to be the example of a well-educated and devout monk, with your dedication to Mary, endless travels, austere lifestyle, and acute sense for beauty.

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Saint Bernard of Clairvaux

Bernard applied for admission to the Cistercian order following the death of his mother in 1547. Three years later, he was assigned to the task of establishing a new abbey in an isolated clearing in a valley known as the Val d’Absinthe, some 15 kilometers southeast of Bar-sur-Aube, where he lived at the time. In accordance with tradition, Bernard built the monastery on June 25, 1115, and named it Claire Vallée, which later became known as Clairvaux. At this location, Bernard would teach a faith that was immediate and in which the Virgin Mary served as an intercessor.

  • Following the death of Pope Honorius II, Bernard was appointed to decide between competitors for the position of Pope.
  • Bernard saw the election of one of his followers, Bernard of Pisa (Eugene III), as Pope in 1145.
  • Bernard proceeded to southern France in June 1145, and his preaching there contributed to the strengthening of anti-heretical sentiment.
  • It was the failure of the crusaders, for which Bernard bore sole responsibility, that weighed heavily on his mind in the latter years of his life.
  • This is where Jesus describes how their sins, just as they were with the crusaders and the Hebrew people, in whose favor the Lord had multiplied his prodigies, had been the root of their sorrow and misery.
  • He was the first Cistercian monk to be included in the calendar of saints, and he was canonized by Pope Alexander III on January 18, 1174, marking the beginning of the Cistercian renaissance.
  • His bones were originally interred in the Clairvaux Abbey, but after the abbey was closed down by the French revolutionary authorities in 1792, his remains were moved to the Troyes Cathedral.
  • Bernard’s efforts resulted in the establishment of 163 monasteries in various regions of Europe.
  • It is common practice among Catholic prayer books to include Saint Bernard’s Prayer to the Shoulder Wound of Jesus in their publications.
  • According to the evidence, Dante chose Bernard because of his contemplative spirituality, love to Mary, and eloquence, among other characteristics.
  • Saint Bernard’s feast day is celebrated on August 20 in the Roman Catholic Church, and he is also known for his many letters, treatises, and sermons.

He is the patron saint of the Cistercians, Burgundy, beekeepers and candlemakers, as well as Gibraltar and the Knights Templar. He was born in Clairvaux, France, and died in Speyer, Germany, on December 12, 1215.

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E. Jane Doering’s full name is E. Jane Doering. Professor Emeritus, Program of Liberal Studies, now retired The gospel of Mark today has two extraordinary episodes, each of which has divine significance: the feeding of the 5,000 with loaves and fishes, and Jesus walking on the waves of the sea. It’s understandable that many would be dubious, but Jesus assuages their fears with the words, “Take courage; it is I; do not be frightened!” Both incidents show Christ’s teaching that love is capable of doing the seemingly impossible.

  1. It was through their activities that his divine love was communicated to others who received what the apostles had.
  2. He was present.
  3. The dread of being deprived of one’s own necessities prevents a person from completely obeying the commitment to love all neighbors, which includes sharing food and providing protection to all of them.
  4. The apostles, on the other hand, had not grasped the situation because they had hardened their hearts.
  5. 5:18) Christ is the epitome of pure love, and he is always with us.
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St. Bernard de Clairvaux

Jane Doering’s full name is E. Jane Doering, and she is an American author. Professor Emeritus, Program of Liberal Studies, University of Southern California The gospel of Mark today contains two extraordinary events, each of which has divine significance: the feeding of the 5,000 with loaves and fishes, and Jesus walking on the waves of the Sea of Galilee. It’s understandable that people would be skeptical, but Jesus assuages their fears with the words, “Take courage! It is I; do not be afraid!” Christ’s message that love can accomplish the unthinkable is illustrated by both of these occurrences: All people are loved by Christ.

When his chosen fishermen were struggling against the wind, he walked up to their boat, calmed the seas, and told them not to be afraid.

Keeping God’s commandments is difficult because of the fear that surrounds them.

Not an easy undertaking.

Christ, on the other hand, lightens our load by assuring us: “Take courage, it is I, do not be afraid!” It is said that “in perfect love there is no fear,” which means that “perfect love drives out fear.” (1 John 4:18; 2 Cor. 5:18; cf. We have Christ with us, who is perfect love.

Saint Bernard of Clairvaux

Also referred to as

  • Doctor of the Church
  • The last of the Fathers of the Holy Church
  • A mellifluous figure.

Doctor of the Church, a mellifluous figure, and the last of the Holy Fathers.

  • Doctor of the Church
  • The last of the Holy Fathers
  • A mellifluous figure.
  • Beekeepers
  • Bees
  • Burgundy, France
  • Candlemakers
  • Chandlers
  • Cistercian Order
  • Cistercians
  • Gibraltar
  • Knights Templar
  • Queens College, Cambridge, England
  • Speyer Cathedral
  • Wax-melters
  • Wax refiners
  • Cistercia

Representation

  • A beehive, bees, a book, a Cistercian having a vision of Mary, a Cistercian with a beehive, a Cistercian with a chained devil, a Cistercian with an amitre on the ground beside him, a Cistercian with a white dog, a Cistercian writing and watching, and a Cistercian with a white dog Mary
  • The instruments of the Passion
  • A pen
  • A whitedog
  • And SaintHumbeline are all present.

Information Supplementary to the above

  • Information Supplemental to the above
  • In Praise of the New Knighthood
  • In Praise of the Holy Guardian Angels
  • In Praise of God’s Love
  • Read online
  • Download the EPub
  • Listen to the Librivox Audio Book
  • And more.
  • The Most Influential Saint of His Time, according to the Catholic Exchange
  • It includes articles such as “The Holy Influence of Saint Bernard,” “Catholic Fire,” “Catholic Herald,” “Catholic Ireland,” and “Catholic News Agency,” among others. James Keifer’s Christian Biographies is a must-read. Evangelical Classics Ethereal Library
  • Christian Iconography
  • Communio
  • Cradio
  • Franciscan Media
  • Independent Catholic News
  • Christian Classics Ethereal Library Olga’s Gallery is located in the heart of the city. The AustralianCatholic Truth Society has published a list of patron saints and their feast days. Pope Benedict XVI’s General Audience on October 21, 2009, as reported in the Regina Magazine. Information on the Saint Peter’s Basilica
  • Saints for Sinners
  • Saints Stories for All Ages
  • Soul Candy
  • UCatholic
  • Saints for Sinners
  • Vultus Christi: O Doctor Mellifluus
  • Vultus Christi, Prefce to Saint Bernard, Abbot
  • Wikipedia
  • William of Saint Thierry
  • The Most Influential Saint of His Time, according to the Catholic Exchange. In this issue of Catholic Exchange, you’ll find articles on the Holy Influence of Saint Bernard, as well as the Catholic Fire, Catholic Herald, Catholic Ireland, Catholic News Agency, and more. Author James Keifer’s Christian Biographies is available. Christian Classics Ethereal Library
  • Christian Iconography
  • Communio
  • Cradio
  • Franciscan Media
  • Independent Catholic News
  • Christian Classics Ethereal Library Olga’s Gallery is a place where you may go and look at things. By the AustralianCatholic Truth Society, Patron Saints and Their Feast Days are listed. Benedict XVI’s general audience on October 21, 2009, according to the Regina Magazine. More information on the Basilica of St. Peter
  • St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome
  • St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome The Saints for Sinners website, the Saints Stories for all ages website, the Soul Candy website, and the uCatholic website are all excellent resources. O Doctor Mellifluus
  • Vultus Christi, Prefect to Saint Bernard, Abbot
  • Wikipedia
  • William of Saint Thierry

All praise to God for Saint Bernard the Wonder-Worker audio books. Saint Bernard, Abbot of Clairvaux, wrote a number of letters.

  • Playlist on YouTube
  • Saint Bernard the Wonder Worker (audiobook)
  • Saint Bernard the Wonder Worker (audiobook).
  • Saint Bernard’s writings on the love of God and the Song of Songs
  • Saint Bernard’s writings on the love of God and the Song of Songs
  • Saint Bernard’s Discourse on Grace and Free Will
  • Saint Bernard’s On Consideration (On Consideration) Saint Bernard’s “Twelve Degrees of Humility and Pride” (The Twelve Degrees of Humility and Pride)
  • Saint Bernard’s reflections on Advent and Christmas
  • In addition, there is Richard Salter Storrs’ Bernard of Claivaux: The Times, The Man and His Work, which is a biography of the French nobleman Bernard of Claivaux. by Dr. Augustus Neader, entitled The Life and Times of Saint Bernard
  • St. Bernard’s Life and Times, a book written by James Cotter Morison
  • By Father Theodore Ratisbonne, The Life and Times of Saint Bernard is a biography of the saint. by Father John Mabillon
  • The Life and Works of Saint Bernard, Volume 1
  • Father John Mabillon’s Life and Works of Saint Bernard, second edition
  • Samuel John Eales’ Saint Bernard, Abbot of Clairvaux is a work of art. Some of Saint Bernard’s letters to the Abbot of Clairvaux
  • Enciclopedia Catolica
  • Martirologio Romano, 2001edición
  • Enciclopedia Catolica
  • Abbé Christian-Philippe Chanut
  • Agnès Richomme
  • Auteurs Anciens
  • Benoît XVI, Audience Générale, 21 October 2009
  • Bollandistes
  • Dictionnaire historique de la Suisse
  • Abbé Christian-Philippe Chanut
  • The Feast of the Prefixes
  • Saint Bernard’s Complete Works of Art
  • Wikipedia
  • A dictionary of Swiss history
  • Cathopedia
  • Dizionario historico della Svizzera
  • San Bernardo di Chiaravalle, L’ultimo padre del Medio evo
  • San Bernardo di Chiaravalle e I normanni
  • Santi e Beati
  • Santo del Giorno
  • Sermoni di Sann Bernardo
  • Wikipedia
  • Marco Binetti
  • Popa Pio XII: Doctor Mellifluus
  • San Bernardo di Chiaravalle, L’ultimo padre del Medio evo
  • San Bernardo di Chiar

Readings When you are in danger, when you have uncertainties, when you are in problems, think of Mary and call on Mary. Never allow her name to be taken from your lips, and never allow it to be taken from your heart. And, in order to benefit from her prayers, you should refrain from following in her footsteps. You will never be lost if you have her as a guide; you will never be discouraged if you invoke her; as long as she is in your thoughts, you will be safe from deception; while she holds your hand, you will not fall; under her protection, you will have nothing to fear; if she walks ahead of you, you will not become weary; if she shows you favor, you will reach your destination.

Love is adequate in and of itself; it provides pleasure both independently and as a result of itself.

When it comes to love, there is no cause outside of itself, and there is no consequence outside of itself.

Even if it is unequal in comparison to the Creator’s love for the creature, love is the only one of all the motions, sensations, and feelings experienced by the soul that allows for a response to the Creator and some form of equivalent return.

Having only one goal in life is for others to love him, secure in the knowledge that those who love him will be made happy as a result of their affection for him.

–SaintBernard Take a look at that cunning calumniator!

His voice is choked with emotions as he attempts to gloss over the defamation that has been on the tip of his tongue for some time.

He expresses his displeasure at discovering that our brother has fallen into such a vice; you are all aware of how much he means to me and how many times I have attempted to rectify him.

If I tried to hide the truth from you, it would be pointless; it is all too real, and I tell you this with tears in my eyes.

Even while this poor unhappy brother possesses much ability, it must be acknowledged that he is also extremely culpable, and no matter how warm our feelings for him, it is impossible to pardon him. The 24th sermon on the Canticles of Saint Bernard of Clairvaux is cited in the MLA.

  • “St. Bernard of Clairvaux” is a saint who lived in Clairvaux, France. CatholicSaints. Information will be available on December 6, 2021. 5th of January, 2022
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