Who Was Saint Barnabas

Saint Barnabas

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Saint Barnabas

St. Barnabas, also known by his original namesJoseph the Levite orJoses the Levite, (lived in the first century; feast day June 11), was an influential early Christian missionary who is referenced in the New Testament and is considered to be one of the Apostles. Acts 4:36–37 describes Barnabas as a Hellenized Jew who became a member of theJerusalemchurch shortly after Christ’s crucifixion, sold his property, and donated the earnings to the community. A Cypriot, he was one of the Cypriots who helped to start the church at Antioch, where he preached (Acts 11:19–20).

Paul from Tarsus as his assistant (Acts 11:25), they engaged in combined missionary activities (Acts 13–14) before traveling to Jerusalem in the year 48.

  • Except for a brief mention by Paul a few years later, there is no contemporaneous indication of his following activities (I Corinthians 9:6).
  • The apocryphalJourneys and Martyrdom of Barnabas, a 5th-century fake, tells the story of Barnabas’ putative martyrdom and burial in the island of Cyprus.
  • Paul and Barnabas formed the Christian community in the Cypriot city of Salamis, which is where Barnabas’ supposed tomb was discovered in 488, close to the Monastery of St.
  • Those in charge of editing the Encyclopaedia Britannica Melissa Petruzzello was the author of the most recent revision and update to this article.

St. Barnabas, apostle

On June 11, Catholics commemorate the life and death of St. Barnabas. The apostle and missionary was one of Christ’s early disciples, and he was responsible for bringing St. Paul into the Church, according to tradition. Despite the fact that he was not one of the twelve apostles selected by the Lord, Jesus, he is generally recognized as one of Christ’s 72 followers and the most esteemed man in the first century Church, second only to the Apostles themselves. Probably around the time of Christ’s own birth, St.

  • According to traditional stories, his parents sent him to Jerusalem to study at the Gamaliel school, where he attended for a period of time (who also taught St.
  • Later on, when Christ’s public ministry started, it’s possible that Barnabas was among those who heard him speak in person for the first time.
  • He sold the vast estate he had inherited, donated the revenues totally to the Church, and joined the other apostles in owning all of their properties in common with the Lord Jesus.
  • Peter for the first time.
  • Paul than with the other apostle.
  • Barnabas and Paul left Antioch with Barnabas’ cousin John Mark, who would later write the most concise account of Christ’s life and be canonized as St.
  • Barnabas and Paul were joined by Barnabas’ cousin John Mark, who would later compose the most concise account of Christ’s life and be canonized as St.

Initially, the group’s explorations into the pagan world met with some success, but Mark got frustrated and decided to return home to Jerusalem.

But for many years prior to this, the two apostles went and preached among the Gentiles, facing persecution and tribulations in the process of spreading Christianity among individuals who did not come from a Jewish family.

Following St.

In response to Paul’s desire that Mark not travel with them again, Barnabas and Paul eventually parted in their ministry, despite remaining apostles of the same Catholic Church.

Barnabas is reported to have been slain by a mob in Cyprus about the year 62, and Mark is said to have buried him.

Paul and St.

Paul’s martyrdom on the Mount of Olives.

In the year 61, he is reported to have been stoned to death in the city of Salamis. “A good man, full of the Holy Spirit and of faith,” according to St. Luke (Acts 6:24), and he was well-known for his outstanding kindness and personal purity, as well as his openness to pagans.

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: St. Barnabas

Please consider making a donation to New Advent in order to receive the complete contents of this website as an immediate download. A single purchase of $19.99 provides access to the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa Theologica, Bible, and other resources. Born to Jewish parents on the island of Cyprus at the beginning of the Christian era, Barnabas (formerly Joseph) was designated as an Apostle in Holy Scripture and, like St. Paul, was numbered with the Twelve by the Church, though he was not one of them.

Clement of Alexandria (StromataII.20) and Eusebius (Church HistoryII.1) both mention him as one of the seventy Disciples; however, Acts (4:36-37) supports the view that he converted to Christianity shortly after Pentecost (around A.D.

The Apostles gave him the surname Barnabas, which was later interpreted as meaning “son of exhortation” or “son of consolation,” most likely because of his success as a preacher (for he is later placed first among the prophets and doctors of Antioch (xiii, 1)), and this was probably because of his success as a preacher.

  • (See, for example, Encyl.
  • 484.) Despite the fact that Barnabas is not mentioned again for several years, it is clear that he rose to a prominent position in the Church at this time.
  • 33 and 38), the Church in Jerusalem, remembering his former fierce spirit, was slow to accept the reality of his conversion.
  • During this time, Saul appears to have gone to his home in Tarsus to dwell in obscurity for a number of years, while Barnabas appears to have remained in Jerusalem.
  • The true purpose of the Christian Church was begun during the dispersion that followed Stephen’s death, when certain Disciples from Cyprus and Cyrene, who were relatively unknown, began preaching to the Gentiles.
  • He saw the fruit of God’s kindness in the conversions that had taken place and, although being a Jew, he warmly welcomed these first Gentile converts.
  • It is evidence of how strongly impressed Barnabas had been by Paul that he instantly thought of him for this job, set out without delay for faraway Tarsus, and convinced Paul to travel to Antioch and begin preaching there.

They worked together for an entire year at Antioch, where they “taught a vast number.” Later, when hunger struck the region, which severely devastated Jerusalem, the sacrifices of the Disciples in Antioch were transported by Barnabas and Saul to the mother-church in Jerusalem (about the year 45).

  • The mission complete, they returned to Antioch, bringing along John Mark, Barnabas’ cousin or nephew (Colossians 4:10), who would go on to become an evangelist (see John Mark 1:1).
  • It was considered that the time had come for more systematic efforts, and the Church of Antioch was moved by the Holy Spirit to send missionaries throughout the Gentile world and to nominate Barnabas and Paul to carry out the job.
  • Cyprus, Barnabas’ native area, was the first to be evangelized, and it was from there that they traveled to Asia Minor.
  • Luke did not specify, though Paul saw the action as abandonment.
  • Throughout their journey, they encountered hostility and sometimes violent persecution from the Jews, who also incited the Gentiles to oppose their cause.
  • Soon after, they were convinced by the Jews to turn and attack the Apostles, injuringSt.

While traveling through Syria, Paul and Barnabas gained many converts, and they returned by the same route to Perge, organizing churches, ordaining presbyters, and placing them over the faithful, so that when they returned to Antioch inSyria, they were convinced that God had “opened a door of faith to the Gentiles” (Acts 13:13-14:27; see articleSAINT PAUL).

  • Preachers arrived from Jerusalem with the message that circumcision was required for salvation, even for Gentiles, and that they were welcome.
  • 47 and 51), granted them a decision in their favor as well as a rousing endorsement of their efforts (Acts 14:27-15:30; see articles COUNCIL OF JERUSALEM;SAINT PETER).
  • St.
  • Some of James’ disciples were dissatisfied by this because they believed Peter’s actions were illegal and in violation of the Mosaic law.
  • Barnabas followed in his footsteps.
  • Paul seemed to have successfully conveyed his message.
  • Barnabas desired to bring John Markaalong once more, but Paul protested because of the past desertion of John Markaa.

Paul was most likely affected by Barnabas’s recent attitude, which might be detrimental to their job if it is not corrected.

Some believe that the church of Antioch demonstrated its approval of Paul’s attitude by wishing him well; however, this interpretation is not supported by the evidence (Acts 15:35-41).

As an Apostle, he was still alive and working in the year 56 or 57 when Paul wrote First Corinthians (9:5-6), from which we may deduce that he, like Paul, was self-sufficient, though on an equal footing with the other Apostles, and that he earned his own living.

It is believed that Barnabas was no longer alive when Paul was imprisoned in Rome (61-63), as evidenced by the fact that John Mark was attached to him as a disciple at the time (Colossians 4:10).

Various legends identify him as the first Bishop of Milan, as having preached in Alexandria and at Rome, where he is supposed to have converted the city’s fourth (?) bishop, St.

They are all late and unreliable, just like the customs.

Paul and a few of the Twelve, Barnabas appears to have been the most highly regarded individual among the first-century Christians.

Luke, abandoning his tendency of reserve, speaks warmly of him, saying, “because he was a good man, filled with the Holy Spirit and full of faith.” It was not only his goodness of heart and personal sanctity that earned him glory, but also his willingness to lay aside his Jewish prejudices, in doing so anticipating certain of the Twelve; from his open-hearted reception of Gentiles; and from his early recognition of Paul’s worth, for which the Christian Church is indebted, at the very least, in large part, for the great Apostle.

His affection for John Markappeared to have been rewarded by the excellent contributions he eventually provided to the Church, according to tradition.

Saint Barnabas’ feast day is commemorated on June 11th each year. He is entrusted byTertullian(probably incorrectly) with the writing of theEpistle to the Hebrews, and the so-calledEpistle of Barnabasis is given to him by a number of Fathers, including Tertullian.

About this page

Please consider making a donation to New Advent in order to receive the complete contents of this website as an immediate download as a thank you. A single purchase of $19.99 provides access to the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa Theologica, Bible, and much more. Born to Jewish parents on the island of Cyprus at the beginning of the Christian era, Barnabas (formerly Joseph) is designated as an Apostle in Holy Scripture and, like St. Paul, is numbered among the Twelve by the Church, albeit he is not one of them.

  • He appears to have settled there (where his relatives, the family of Mark the Evangelist, also lived—Acts 12:12), and to have owned property in the area (4:36-37).
  • 29 or 30) and immediately sold his property and donated the proceeds to the Church.
  • This, however, is not the correct etymology.
  • Bibli., I, col.
  • Barnabas appears to have risen to a prominent position in the Church during this time period, even though nothing is known about him for a while.
  • 33 and 38), the Church in Jerusalem, remembering Saul’s former fierce spirit, was slow to believe in the reality of his conversion.
  • (Galatians 1:18-19).

A by-product of Saul’s personal suffering was the incident that brought them back together and opened the door to their lifework for both of them.

They had enormous success among the Greeks at Antioch, Syria, and when word of their success reached the Apostles, they dispatched Barnabas to Antioch to study the work of his countrymen there.

Immediately, the possibilities of this vast field were brought to his attention.

That they ended up in theGentilefield was no accident, as revealed by this occurrence, which sheds light on their individual personalities.

Barnabas and Saul were responsible for transporting the sacrifices of the Disciples in Antioch to Jerusalem when a famine struck the region, which severely devastated the capital city at the time (about 45 AD) (Acts 11).

(Acts 12:25).

They left as a result, following the imposition of hands, accompanied by John Markas’s assistance.

John Mark deserted them here, at Perge in Pamphylia, the first resting site, for an unknown cause, which his buddy St.

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Although they were preaching at Antioch of Pisidia, they also went to Iconium, Lystra, Derbe, and other places in the interior of a pretty rough territory.

When the Apostles arrived in Lystra, the superstitious public mistook Paul, who had just treated a crippled man, for Hermes (Mercury) “because he was the foremost speaker,” and Barnabas for Jupiter, and they were on their way to sacrifice a bull to them when they were stopped by the apostles.

Paul nearly mortally as a result of their mob-like behavior.

(Acts 13:13-14:27; see articleSAINT PAUL).

It was fromJerusalem that preachers brought the gospel message that circumcision was required, even for Gentiles, to be saved.

47 and 51), granted them a decision in their favor as well as a hearty commendation for their efforts (Acts 14:27-15:30; see articles COUNCIL OF JERUSALEM;SAINT PETER).

In addition to dining with the Gentiles, St.

Some of James’ disciples were dissatisfied with Peter’s actions because they believed they were illegal and in violation of the Mosaic law.

Having learned from him, Barnabas went on to do the same thing.

His message seemed to have been successfully conveyed by Paul.

Due of his prior desertion, Paul opposed to Barnabas’ desire to bring John Marka along with him yet again.

In some ways, Paul’s attitude toward Barnabas may have been impacted by his previous actions, which may have been detrimental to their mission.

Some feel that the church of Antioch demonstrated its agreement of Paul’s attitude by wishing him well; however, this interpretation is not supported by the text itself (Acts 15:35-41).

Paul authored First Corinthians (9:5-6), which tells us that he, like Paul, earned his own living, though on an equal basis with the other Apostles.

It also implies that the friendship between them remained unaffected by the events that occurred.

According to all indications, this is the case.

Clement, and as suffering martyrdom in Cyprus.

Barring the apostle Paul and a few of the Twelve, Barnabas appears to have been the most well-liked person among the early Christian generation.

Luke, abandoning his tendency of reservedness, talks of him with fondness, “because he was a good man, filled with the Holy Spirit and full of faith.” It was not only his goodness of heart and personal sanctity that earned him glory, but also his willingness to lay aside his Jewish prejudices, in doing so anticipating certain of the Twelve; from his open-hearted reception of Gentiles; and from his early recognition of Paul’s worth, for which the Christian Church is indebted, at the very least, in large part, for its great Apostle.

Apparently, the Church benefited from his kindness towards John Mark, as seen by the excellent services he eventually provided to the congregation.

There is a festival dedicated to St. Barnabas on June 11th. He is entrusted byTertullian(probably incorrectly) with the writing of theEpistle to the Hebrews, and the so-calledEpistle of Barnabasis is assigned to him by a number of Fathers, among them Tertullian himself.

St. Barnabas – Saints & Angels

Please consider donating to New Advent in order to receive the complete contents of this website as an immediate download. For only $19.99, you may have the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa, Bible, and more. Born to Jewish parents on the island of Cyprus at the beginning of the Christian era, Barnabas (formerly Joseph) was designated as an Apostle in Holy Scripture and, like St. Paul, was classed among the Twelve by the Church. As an Israelite, he naturally spent a great deal of time in Jerusalem, possibly even before the Crucifixion of Our Lord, and he appears to have made his home there (where his relatives, the family of Mark the Evangelist, also made their home —Acts 12:12), as well as to have owned property in the area (4:36-37).

  1. 29 or 30) and immediately sold his property and donated the proceeds to the Church (Acts 4:16-17).
  2. It is, however, debatable what the true etymology is.
  3. Bibli., I, col.
  4. When Saul the persecutor, afterwards known as Paul the Apostle, on his first visit to Jerusalem following his conversion (dating widely from A.D.
  5. According to the Acts, Barnabas acted as Paul’s sponsor and arranged for him to be accepted by the Apostles, however he only saw Peter and James, the brother of the Lord, according to Paul himself (Galatians 1:18-19).
  6. The incident that reunited them and opened the door to their life’s work for both of them was an indirect outcome of Saul’s personal suffering.
  7. They had enormous success among the Greeks at Antioch, Syria, and when word of this reached the Apostles, they dispatched Barnabas to Antioch to study the work of his countrymen.

His eyes were immediately awakened to the possibilities of this vast area.

This encounter, which sheds light on the personalities of both characters, demonstrates that their arrival at theGentilefield was no casual coincidence.

45).

When their mission was completed, they returned to Antioch, bringing with them John Mark, the future Evangelist, who was Barnabas’ cousin or nephew (Colossians 4:10).

It was considered that the time had come for more systematic efforts, and the Church of Antioch had been moved by the Holy Spirit to send missionaries throughout the Gentile world and to select Barnabas and Paul to carry out the job.

Cyprus, Barnabas’ native area, was the first to be evangelized, and then they moved on to Asia Minor.

Luke did not specify, while Paul saw the deed as abandonment.

They were faced with hostility and even violent persecution from the Jews, who also incited the Gentiles to oppose them at every turn.

They acted in a mob-like manner, but were soon convinced by the Jews to turn and attack the Apostles, injuring St.

While traveling through Syria, Paul and Barnabas gained many converts, and they returned by the same route to Perge, organizing churches, ordaining presbyters, and placing them over the faithful, so that when they returned to Antioch inSyria, they believed that God had “opened a door of faith to the Gentiles” (Acts 13:13-14:27; see articleSAINT PAUL).

  • Preachers from Jerusalem brought the message that circumcision was required for salvation, even for Gentiles.
  • 47 and 51), granted them a decision in their favor as well as a rousing endorsement of their efforts (Acts 14:27-15:30; see articles COUNCIL OF JERUSALEM;SAINT PETER).
  • St.
  • Some of James’ disciples were dissatisfied by this because they believed Peter’s actions were illegal and in violation of the Mosaic law.
  • Barnabas was inspired by him and followed in his footsteps.
  • Paul seemed to have successfully conveyed his idea.
  • Barnabas desired to bring John Markaalong once again, but Paul protested because of the prior desertion.

Paul was most likely inspired by Barnabas’s recent attitude, which may have been detrimental to their efforts.

Some feel that the church of Antioch demonstrated its acceptance of Paul’s attitude by wishing him well; nevertheless, this conclusion is not guaranteed (Acts 15:35-41).

Paul authored First Corinthians (9:5-6), which tells us that he, like Paul, earned his own living, though on an equal basis with the other Apostles.

The phrase also implies that the friendship between the two individuals remained intact.

This appears to be a possibility.

Clement, and as having experienced martyrdom in Cyprus.

Barring the apostle Paul and a few of the Twelve, Barnabas appears to have been the most well-liked person in the first Christian generation.

Luke, abandoning his norm of reservedness, talks of him with fondness, “because he was a good man, full of the Holy Spirit and of faith.” His claim to glory stems not only from his goodness of heart, personal sanctity, and missionary efforts, but also from his willingness to set aside his Jewish prejudices, in doing so anticipating certain of the Twelve; from his open-hearted reception of Gentiles; and from his early recognition of Paul’s worth, for which the Christian Church is indebted, at the very least, for the great Apostle.

His affection for John Markseems to have been rewarded by the great contributions he eventually provided to the Church.

Saint Barnabas’ feast day is commemorated on June 11th. He is entrusted by Tertullian (possibly incorrectly) with the writing of theEpistle to the Hebrews, and the so-calledEpistle of Barnabasis is assigned to him by a number of Fathers.

To all our readers,

Please consider supporting the mission of New Advent by downloading the whole contents of this website as an immediate download. Includes the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa, Bible, and more – all for the low price of $19.99. Barnabas (formerly Joseph), called an Apostle in Holy Scripture and, like St. Paul, listed with the Twelve by the Church, though he was not one of them; b. of Jewish parents on the island of Cyprus at the beginning of the Christian era. As an Israelite, he naturally spent a great deal of time in Jerusalem, possibly even before the Crucifixion of Our Lord, and he appears to have made his home there (where his relatives, the family of Mark the Evangelist, also made their home — Acts 12:12), as well as to have owned property in the area (4:36-37).

  1. 29 or 30) and immediately sold his property and donated the proceeds to the Church.
  2. It is, however, debatable what the actual etymology is.
  3. Bibli., I, col.
  4. When Saul the persecutor, afterwards known as Paul the Apostle, on his first visit to Jerusalem following his conversion (dating from A.D.
  5. The Acts record that Barnabas served as Paul’s sponsor and arranged for him to be accepted by the Apostles (9:27), yet he only saw Peter and James, the brother of the Lord, according to Paul himself (Galatians 1:18-19).
  6. The incident that brought them back together and opened the way to their life’s work for both of them was an indirect outcome of Saul’s personal suffering.
  7. They had enormous success among the Greeks at Antioch, Syria, and when word of this reached the Apostles, they dispatched Barnabas to Antioch to study the work of his fellow countrymen.

His eyes were immediately awakened to the promise of this vast realm.

This occurrence, which sheds information on each character, demonstrates that they did not get to theGentilefield by chance.

45).

When their mission was completed, they returned to Antioch, carrying with them the relative, or nephew, of Barnabas (Colossians 4:10), John Mark, who would go on to become an evangelist (Acts 12:25).

They left as a result, following the imposition of hands, with the assistance of John Mark.

Here, at Perge in Pamphylia, the first resting site, John Mark abandoned them for an unknown cause, which his buddy St.

The two Apostles, on the other hand, pushed into the heart of a somewhat rough territory and preached at Antioch of Pisidia, Iconium, Lystra, and other places.

The most memorable episode of the voyage occurred in Lystra, when the superstitious population mistook Paul, who had just healed a crippled man, for Hermes (Mercury), and Barnabas for Jupiter, and were ready to sacrifice a bull to them when the Apostles intervened.

Paul almost gravely.

Barnabas and Paul had been at Antioch for “a considerable period of time” when they were threatened with the destruction of their mission and the halting of its future growth.

The Apostles of the Gentiles, realizing right away that this doctrine would be fatal to their work, traveled to Jerusalem to confront it; the older Apostles welcomed them warmly and, at what is known as the Council of Jerusalem (which took place between A.D.

When they returned to Antioch, they briefly resumed their preaching activities.

Peter came down and interacted freely with the Gentiles, including dining with them.

In the face of their protests, Peter succumbed, probably out of fear of upsetting them, and declined to continue eating with the Gentiles.

Paul reprimanded them in front of the entire congregation because he believed they “did not act uprightly according to the truth of the gospel” (Galatians 2:11-15).

Shortly after, he and Barnabas made the decision to reassess their missions.

Following a heated debate, the Apostles chose to split up.

Barnabas sailed with John Mark to Cyprus, while Paul traveled with Silas to the churches of Asia Minor.

Barnabas’s following professional life is only vaguely documented.

The allusion also implies that the friendship between the two men remained unaffected.

This appears to be a reasonable assumption.

Clement, and as having endured martyrdom in Cyprus.

With the possible exception ofSt.

St.

His affection for John Markappears to have been rewarded by the great contributions he eventually provided to the Church.

The feast of St. Barnabas is commemorated on the 11th of June. He is entrusted by Tertullian(probably incorrectly) with the writing of theEpistle to the Hebrews, and the so-calledEpistle of Barnabasis is assigned to him by a number of Fathers.

Who Was St Barnabas? – St Barnabas Northolt Park

Please consider making a donation to New Advent in order to receive the complete contents of this website as an immediate download. A single purchase of $19.99 provides access to the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa Theologica, Bible, and other resources. Born to Jewish parents on the island of Cyprus at the beginning of the Christian era, Barnabas (formerly Joseph) was designated as an Apostle in Holy Scripture and, like St. Paul, was numbered with the Twelve by the Church, though he was not one of them.

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Clement of Alexandria (StromataII.20) and Eusebius (Church HistoryII.1) both mention him as one of the seventy Disciples; however, Acts (4:36-37) supports the view that he converted to Christianity shortly after Pentecost (around A.D.

The Apostles gave him the surname Barnabas, which was later interpreted as meaning “son of exhortation” or “son of consolation,” most likely because of his success as a preacher (for he is later placed first among the prophets and doctors of Antioch (xiii, 1)), and this was probably because of his success as a preacher.

  1. (See, for example, Encyl.
  2. 484.) Despite the fact that Barnabas is not mentioned again for several years, it is clear that he rose to a prominent position in the Church at this time.
  3. 33 and 38), the Church in Jerusalem, remembering his former fierce spirit, was slow to accept the reality of his conversion.
  4. During this time, Saul appears to have gone to his home in Tarsus to dwell in obscurity for a number of years, while Barnabas appears to have remained in Jerusalem.
  5. The true purpose of the Christian Church was begun during the dispersion that followed Stephen’s death, when certain Disciples from Cyprus and Cyrene, who were relatively unknown, began preaching to the Gentiles.
  6. He saw the fruit of God’s kindness in the conversions that had taken place and, although being a Jew, he warmly welcomed these first Gentile converts.
  7. It is evidence of how strongly impressed Barnabas had been by Paul that he instantly thought of him for this job, set out without delay for faraway Tarsus, and convinced Paul to travel to Antioch and begin preaching there.

They worked together for an entire year at Antioch, where they “taught a vast number.” Later, when hunger struck the region, which severely devastated Jerusalem, the sacrifices of the Disciples in Antioch were transported by Barnabas and Saul to the mother-church in Jerusalem (about the year 45).

  • The mission complete, they returned to Antioch, bringing along John Mark, Barnabas’ cousin or nephew (Colossians 4:10), who would go on to become an evangelist (see John Mark 1:1).
  • It was considered that the time had come for more systematic efforts, and the Church of Antioch was moved by the Holy Spirit to send missionaries throughout the Gentile world and to nominate Barnabas and Paul to carry out the job.
  • Cyprus, Barnabas’ native area, was the first to be evangelized, and it was from there that they traveled to Asia Minor.
  • Luke did not specify, though Paul saw the action as abandonment.
  • Throughout their journey, they encountered hostility and sometimes violent persecution from the Jews, who also incited the Gentiles to oppose their cause.
  • Soon after, they were convinced by the Jews to turn and attack the Apostles, injuringSt.

While traveling through Syria, Paul and Barnabas gained many converts, and they returned by the same route to Perge, organizing churches, ordaining presbyters, and placing them over the faithful, so that when they returned to Antioch inSyria, they were convinced that God had “opened a door of faith to the Gentiles” (Acts 13:13-14:27; see articleSAINT PAUL).

  1. Preachers arrived from Jerusalem with the message that circumcision was required for salvation, even for Gentiles, and that they were welcome.
  2. 47 and 51), granted them a decision in their favor as well as a rousing endorsement of their efforts (Acts 14:27-15:30; see articles COUNCIL OF JERUSALEM;SAINT PETER).
  3. St.
  4. Some of James’ disciples were dissatisfied by this because they believed Peter’s actions were illegal and in violation of the Mosaic law.
  5. Barnabas followed in his footsteps.
  6. Paul seemed to have successfully conveyed his message.
  7. Barnabas desired to bring John Markaalong once more, but Paul protested because of the past desertion of John Markaa.

Paul was most likely affected by Barnabas’s recent attitude, which might be detrimental to their job if it is not corrected.

Some argue that the church of Antioch demonstrated its agreement of Paul’s attitude by wishing him well; however, this interpretation is not supported by the evidence (Acts 15:35-41).

As an Apostle, he was still alive and working in the year 56 or 57 when Paul wrote First Corinthians (9:5-6), from which we may deduce that he, like Paul, was self-sufficient, though on an equal footing with the other Apostles, and that he earned his own living.

It is believed that Barnabas was no longer alive while Paul was imprisoned in Rome (61-63), as evidenced by the fact that John Mark was affiliated to him as a follower at the time (Colossians 4:10).

Various legends identify him as the first Bishop of Milan, as having preached in Alexandria and at Rome, where he is supposed to have converted the city’s fourth (?) bishop, St.

They are all late and unreliable, just like the customs.

Paul and a few of the Twelve, Barnabas appears to have been the most highly regarded individual among the first-century Christians.

Luke, abandoning his tendency of reserve, speaks warmly of him, saying, “because he was a good man, filled with the Holy Spirit and full of faith.” It was not only his goodness of heart and personal sanctity that earned him glory, but also his willingness to lay aside his Jewish prejudices, in doing so anticipating certain of the Twelve; from his open-hearted reception of Gentiles; and from his early recognition of Paul’s worth, for which the Christian Church is indebted, at the very least, in large part, for the great Apostle.

His affection for John Markappeared to have been rewarded by the excellent contributions he eventually provided to the Church, according to tradition.

Saint Barnabas’ feast day is commemorated on June 11th each year. He is entrusted byTertullian(probably incorrectly) with the writing of theEpistle to the Hebrews, and the so-calledEpistle of Barnabasis is given to him by a number of Fathers, including Tertullian.

Memorial of Saint Barnabas the Apostle

Please consider making a donation to New Advent in order to receive the complete contents of this website as an immediate download as a thank you. A single purchase of $19.99 provides access to the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa Theologica, Bible, and much more. Born to Jewish parents on the island of Cyprus at the beginning of the Christian era, Barnabas (formerly Joseph) is designated as an Apostle in Holy Scripture and, like St. Paul, is numbered among the Twelve by the Church, albeit he is not one of them.

  • He appears to have settled there (where his relatives, the family of Mark the Evangelist, also lived—Acts 12:12), and to have owned property in the area (4:36-37).
  • 29 or 30) and immediately sold his property and donated the proceeds to the Church.
  • This, however, is not the correct etymology.
  • Bibli., I, col.
  • Barnabas appears to have risen to a prominent position in the Church during this time period, even though nothing is known about him for a while.
  • 33 and 38), the Church in Jerusalem, remembering Saul’s former fierce spirit, was slow to believe in the reality of his conversion.
  • (Galatians 1:18-19).

A by-product of Saul’s personal suffering was the incident that brought them back together and opened the door to their lifework for both of them.

They had enormous success among the Greeks at Antioch, Syria, and when word of their success reached the Apostles, they dispatched Barnabas to Antioch to study the work of his countrymen there.

Immediately, the possibilities of this vast field were brought to his attention.

That they ended up in theGentilefield was no accident, as revealed by this occurrence, which sheds light on their individual personalities.

Barnabas and Saul were responsible for transporting the sacrifices of the Disciples in Antioch to Jerusalem when a famine struck the region, which severely devastated the capital city at the time (about 45 AD) (Acts 11).

(Acts 12:25).

They left as a result, following the imposition of hands, accompanied by John Markas’s assistance.

John Mark deserted them here, at Perge in Pamphylia, the first resting site, for an unknown cause, which his buddy St.

Although they were preaching at Antioch of Pisidia, they also went to Iconium, Lystra, Derbe, and other places in the interior of a pretty rough territory.

When the Apostles arrived in Lystra, the superstitious public mistook Paul, who had just treated a crippled man, for Hermes (Mercury) “because he was the foremost speaker,” and Barnabas for Jupiter, and they were on their way to sacrifice a bull to them when they were stopped by the apostles.

Paul nearly mortally as a result of their mob-like behavior.

(Acts 13:13-14:27; see articleSAINT PAUL).

It was fromJerusalem that preachers brought the gospel message that circumcision was required, even for Gentiles, to be saved.

47 and 51), granted them a decision in their favor as well as a hearty commendation for their efforts (Acts 14:27-15:30; see articles COUNCIL OF JERUSALEM;SAINT PETER).

In addition to dining with the Gentiles, St.

Some of James’ disciples were dissatisfied with Peter’s actions because they believed they were illegal and in violation of the Mosaic law.

Having learned from him, Barnabas went on to do the same thing.

His message seemed to have been successfully conveyed by Paul.

Due of his prior desertion, Paul opposed to Barnabas’ desire to bring John Marka along with him yet again.

In some ways, Paul’s attitude toward Barnabas may have been impacted by his previous actions, which may have been detrimental to their mission.

Some feel that the church of Antioch demonstrated its agreement of Paul’s attitude by wishing him well; however, this interpretation is not supported by the text itself (Acts 15:35-41).

Paul authored First Corinthians (9:5-6), which tells us that he, like Paul, earned his own living, though on an equal basis with the other Apostles.

It also implies that the friendship between them remained unaffected by the events that occurred.

According to all indications, this is the case.

Clement, and as suffering martyrdom in Cyprus.

Barring the apostle Paul and a few of the Twelve, Barnabas appears to have been the most well-liked person among the early Christian generation.

Luke, abandoning his tendency of reservedness, talks of him with fondness, “because he was a good man, filled with the Holy Spirit and full of faith.” It was not only his goodness of heart and personal sanctity that earned him glory, but also his willingness to lay aside his Jewish prejudices, in doing so anticipating certain of the Twelve; from his open-hearted reception of Gentiles; and from his early recognition of Paul’s worth, for which the Christian Church is indebted, at the very least, in large part, for its great Apostle.

Apparently, the Church benefited from his kindness towards John Mark, as seen by the excellent services he eventually provided to the congregation.

There is a festival dedicated to St. Barnabas on June 11th. He is entrusted byTertullian(probably incorrectly) with the writing of theEpistle to the Hebrews, and the so-calledEpistle of Barnabasis is assigned to him by a number of Fathers, among them Tertullian himself.

Saint Barnabas the Apostle

Also referred to as In addition to this, the term

  • In addition to being recognized as

In addition to this,

  • Antioch, Cyprus
  • Invoked as a peacemaker
  • Marbella, Costa del Sol, Spain
  • Marino, Italy
  • Against hailstorms
  • Antioch, Cyprus

The city of Marbella on the Costa del Sol, Spain; the town of Marino, Italy; the city of Antioch, Cyprus; the city of Antioch, Cyprus; the city of Antioch, Cyprus;

  • The use of an ax or lance
  • A middle-aged beardedapostle, frequently clutching abookor olive branch
  • Standing on or near a pile ofstones while holding a book
  • The presence of Saint Paul
  • The use of a book
  • The use of stones

Information Supplementary to the above

  • Book of Saints by the Monks of Ramsgate
  • Catholic Encyclopedia
  • Encyclopedia Britannica
  • Acts of Barnabas
  • A Garner of Saints by Allen Banks Hinds, M.A.
  • Acts of Barnabas Legendary status
  • Lives of Illustrious Men by Saint Jerome
  • Lives of the Saints by Father Alban Butler
  • New Catholic Dictionary
  • Pictorial Lives of the Saints
  • Pictorial Lives of the Saints Pope Benedict XVI’s General Audience was held on January 31, 2007. The Martyrology of the Romans, 1914 edition
  • Saints and Saintly Dominicans, by Blessed Hyacinthe-Marie Cormier, O.P.
  • Saints and Saintly Dominicans, by Blessed Hyacinthe-Marie Cormier, O.P. Among the works of Monsignor John T McMahon are Saints of the Canon and Saints of the Day, both by Katherine Rabenstein. Brief Biographies of the Saints, written by Eleanor Cecilia Donnelly
  • A Small Geographical Historical and Archaeological Dictionary for Understanding the New Testament
  • A collection of books
  • The Catholic Fire
  • Catholic Information Network
  • Catholic Ireland
  • Catholic News Agency
  • Catholic Online
  • Christian Iconography
  • Communio
  • Cradio
  • Executed Today
  • Franciscan Media
  • Independent Catholic News
  • The Catholic Fire
  • Catholic Information Network. The Catholic Fire. In the following sources: James Keifer, the Jewish Encyclopedia, John Dillon, Patron Saints and Their Feast Days, by the Australian Catholic Truth Society, Regina Magazine, Saints Stories for All Ages, uCatholic, Wikipedia. In the following sources: In the following sources:
  • Bollandistes
  • Fête des prénoms
  • Wikipedia
  • Abbé Christian-Philippe Chanut
  • Bollandistes

Citation in MLA Format

  • Referencing in the MLA
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St. Barnabas: Son of Encouragement – Literature – Resources

St. Barnabas is a remarkable man who, unlike some of the other names in the New Testament, is not as widely known as he should be. His name appears for the first time in the Holy Book of Acts. Barnabas was given the name Barnabas by the disciples after he was given the names Joseph and Joses. Barnabas means “son of encouragement” or “son of consolation” (Acts 4:36). This was, without a doubt, a very appropriate moniker for someone who lived to inspire individuals who were afraid or rejected by their peers.

  1. Barnabas was born on the island of Cyprus, where he was a Jew from the tribe of Levi.
  2. Clement of Alexandria and the historian Eusabius, he was one of the seventy apostles who were commissioned by our Lord Jesus Christ to proclaim the gospel (Lk 10:1).
  3. St.
  4. Due to the fact that he was a wonderful guy, filled with the Holy Spirit and full of faith (Acts 11:24).
  5. Barnabas was a good-hearted guy who had the thought of Christ implanted in him, making him a powerful missionary.
  6. He was filled with the Christian faith himself, and he sought to share it with others.
  7. He was confident in his beliefs, and he urged the others to do the same as well.

Barnabas is that he was one of those who sold their property and placed all of their gains at their feet to provide for the needs of the poor in the Jerusalem Church, according to the New Testament.

The generosity and compassionate deeds of St.

We meet St.

After learning of Saul’s reputation, his persecution of the Church in Jerusalem, and his presence at the stoning of St.

And when Saul arrived in Jerusalem, he attempted to join the disciples, but they were all intimidated by him and did not accept that he was a follower of Jesus Christ (Acts 9:26).

Barnabas had trust in this new convert and, despite widespread anxiety, he opted to encourage Saul, welcome him, and bring him to the other apostles in the church.

However, Barnabas took him and brought him to the apostles, but they refused to accept him.

Because of the support of St.

When word reached the apostles in Jerusalem that men from Cyprus and Cyrene had gone to Antioch to preach to the Hellenists, they rejoiced.

In fact, because they saw the hand of the Lord on them and a large number of people believed and converted to the Lord (Acts 11:20), they resolved to dispatch one of them immediately.

Barnabas was selected by the apostles for this position and sent to Antioch to assist in the strengthening of the activity there.

Barnabas the encourager arrived in this city and saw the fruit of the people’s labor and the mercy of God, he took it upon himself to encourage others and to extend the ministry.

St.

He felt the need for assistance in his ministry at Antioch, and because of the character of the city, he considered Saul to be like himself.

Barnabas set off immediately towards the faraway city of Tarsus in order to track down Saul.

These two men, Barnabas and Saul, were extremely successful and productive.

As a result, they gathered with the church for a whole year and taught a large number of people.

The fact that Barnabas and Saul are mentioned first in St.

Barnabas is the most important person involved in this trip.

Because the Christians in Judea appeared to be particularly devastated, the believers in Antioch banded together to raise finances, and it was once again the duo of Barnabas and Saul who sent the relief monies from Antioch to Jerusalem.

This they accomplished as well, and it was delivered to the elders via the hands of Barnabas and Saul (Acts 11:29-30).

Barnabas (Col 4:10), St.

While remaining in Antioch, there is a lot to see and do.

Paul’s first missionary journey (Acts 13:4-7).

Mark embarked on this voyage beside them.

On that island, two significant developments occurred: Saul was renamed Paul and St.

Barnabas to St.

They continued their journey to Salamis, then to Paphos, and finally to Perga, when, for some reason, St.

Continuing on their trip, St.

Barnabas eventually arrived in the city of Antioch in Syria.

Paul’s second missionary journey to the churches of Asia Minor, St.

However, when St.

Mark along with them, St.

Mark’s refusal to complete the initial voyage with them, expressed his displeasure with the suggestion.

St.

The fact that St.

Paul by serving as a sponsor and mentor to a promising servant of the Lord.

Barnabas is officially concluded in the Holy Book of Acts, yet he is cited more than once in the writings of Saint Paul (1 Cor 9:6; Gal 2:1,9,13; Col 4:10).

He was carrying a hand-copied copy of the Gospel of Saint Matthew at the time of his death, according to tradition.

Please grant us the grace to be like St. Barnabas, excellent servants who are filled of the Holy Spirit, who see the best in people and who are encouragers to all, so that the name of our Lord Jesus Christ may be glorified.

Who is Saint Barnabas? — Mike and Barney’s

Saint Barnabas was described as “a decent guy who was filled with the Holy Spirit.” Barnabas (Greek: v), born Joseph, was an early Christian and one of the most important Christian disciples in Jerusalem during the time of Jesus Christ. According to Acts 4:36, Barnabas was a Cypriot Jew who lived in Antioch. As a result of his designation as an apostle in Acts 14:14, he and Paul the Apostle went on missionary missions together and defended Gentile converts against the Judaizers. They went together, converting many people (c.

  1. A effective evangelistic campaign was carried out by Barnabas and Paul among the “God-fearing” Gentiles who frequented synagogues in different Hellenized cities throughout Anatolia.
  2. However, Tertullian claimed that he was the author of the Epistle to the Hebrews.
  3. His authorship of the Epistle of Barnabas has been assigned to him by Clement of Alexandria and certain academics, although this has been called into question.
  4. He is regarded as the founder of the Cypriot Orthodox Church, which dates back to the fourth century.

Saint Barnabas

‘A decent man who is filled with the Holy Spirit,’ says Saint Barnabas of himself. In the first century, Barnabas (Greek: v), born Joseph, was a renowned Christian follower in Jerusalem and one of the most important early Christians. Barnabas was a Cypriot Jew, according to Acts 4:36. He and Paul the Apostle went on missionary missions together and defended Gentile converts against the Judaizers. He was formally recognized as an apostle in (Acts 14:14). From 45 to 47, they journeyed together, converting additional people and taking part in the Council of Jerusalem (c 50).

In the Book of Acts, Barnabas’ tale is told, and he is mentioned by Paul in several of his epistles, including the first and second.

His authorship of the Epistle of Barnabas has been assigned to him by certain academics, including Clement of Alexandria, although this has been called into question.

As the founder of the Cypriot Orthodox Church, he is widely regarded as the authority on the subject. Barnabas’ feast day is commemorated on June 11th every year.

St. Barnabas

Despite the fact that he was not one of the twelve Apostles, St. Barnabas was regarded as an Apostle and an influential leader in the early Church, alongside St. Paul, among others. “There was a specific Levite from Cyprus called Joseph, to whom the Apostles gave the name ‘Barnabas’ (which means’son of encouragement’) in the Acts of the Apostles,” the book of Acts says. He sold a farm that he possessed and donated the proceeds to the church, putting the money at the feet of the Apostles” (Acts 4:36-37).

  1. In order to represent the Church in Jerusalem in the newly founded Christian community in Antioch, Barnabas dispatched Paul with him as an official delegate.
  2. The church in Antioch recognized Paul and Barnabas as inspired leaders and dispatched the two to preach to the Gentiles on their behalf (non-Jews).
  3. Paul and Barnabas embarked on a journey that took them to Cyprus (where Barnabas is credited with founding the Church) and throughout Greece.
  4. The apostle Barnabas broke away from Paul and took Mark with him to Cyprus when Paul refused to allow him to accompany them on a subsequent missionary voyage.
  5. There is little further known about St.

Lessons

  • 1. Providing encouragement to other Christians in their faith is a crucial ministry
  • St. Barnabas, a real “son of encouragement,” serves as a shining example of this principle. 2. Even Christians need to be reconciled to one another on a consistent basis. Barnabas and Paul had a falling out over Mark’s previous departure, but they were able to reconcile and finally rejoin in peace.

Image attributed to Juan Martn Cabezalero, which is in the public domain and can be found on Wikimedia Commons.

Saint Barnabas the Apostle – Newman Connection

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  • Invocation as a Peacemaker
  • Patronage:Cyprus, Antioch, Against Hailstorms
  • Century:1st Century
  • Feast Day:June 11th

St. Barnabas was born Joseph, and he was one of the earliest Christian martyrs. Despite the fact that Barnabas was not one of the original Twelve Apostles, he was referred to as such by the early Christian community (Acts 14:14.) There is also a Church tradition that Barnabas was the “first of the seventy disciples of our Lord,” according to this tradition. After being consecrated by the church in Antioch, along with the apostle Paul, for their first missionary tour, both Barnabas and Paul were accorded the title and status of Apostles from that point on.

  1. The missionary voyage of Barnabas and Paul was limited to the areas of Cyprus and Asia Minor.
  2. His home island of Cyprus served as the destination for Barnabas’ second missionary expedition.
  3. Barnabas died at his home town of Salamis, Cyprus, where he was born and raised.
  4. Barnabas was a Cypriot Jew, according to Acts 4:36, and he was formally recognized as an Apostle in Acts 14:14.
  5. They went together, converting people, and they were present at the Council of Jerusalem in the year 50, which was an early Church Council of the early Church of Christ.
  6. The tale of Barnabas is told in the Acts of the Apostles, and he is mentioned by Paul in several of his Epistles.
  7. In light of Colossians 4, Barnabas is frequently recognized as Mark’s cousin, and this is a common interpretation.

He appears mostly in the book of Acts, which is a Christian history of the early Christian Church, as well as in numerous of Paul’s Epistles, among other places.

Barnabas was born Joseph, and he was one of the earliest Christian martyrs.

After being consecrated by the church in Antioch, along with the apostle Paul, for their first missionary tour, both Barnabas and Paul were accorded the title and status of Apostles from that point on.

The missionary voyage of Barnabas and Paul was limited to the areas of Cyprus and Asia Minor.

His home island of Cyprus served as the destination for Barnabas’ second missionary expedition.

The Church of Cyprus was formed by the apostles Barnabas and Paul while on their first missionary tour to the island. Barnabas died at his hometown of Salamis, Cyprus, and was buried secretly by his nephew John Mark, who had accompanied him. It is thought that he was martyred in the year 61 AD.

Our Patron Saint

Barnabas was one of the seventy-two disciples who were summoned by Jesus to follow him. He was originally from Cyprus, a Greek island off the coast of Turkey. The disciples referred to him as Barnabas, which is a Hebrew phrase that means “son of encouragement,” despite the fact that he was born Joseph. It is impossible to read the Acts of the Apostles without developing a fondness for Barnabas’ character. A living testimony to Christ’s teachings was provided through Barnabas’ generosity and faith.

Barnabas was a source of inspiration for many people, most notably Paul.

Known for his persecution of Christ’s believers, Saul (later known as Paul) was a man who few people thought had changed his mind.

Barnabas demonstrated to them via his words and deeds that he firmly believed in the ability of the Gospel message to alter people’s hearts and minds.

Paul by the church for his contributions to the cause.

Years went by during which Barnabas and Paul would travel and preach together to both Jews and Gentiles.

It was in this location that Christ’s disciples were originally referred to as “Christians” (Acts 11:26).

On June 11, the Catholic Church commemorates his death and resurrection.

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