Who Painted The Vision Of Saint John

Opening of the Fifth Seal – Wikipedia

The Opening of the Fifth Seal
Artist El Greco
Year 1608–1614
Medium oil on canvas
Dimensions 224.8 cm × 199.4 cm (88.5 in × 78.5 in)
Location The Metropolitan Museum of Art,New York City

It was painted in the last years of El Greco’s life for a side-altar of the church ofSaint John the Baptist outside the walls ofToledo, and it is known as The Opening of the Fifth Seal (also known as The Fifth Seal of Apocalypse or The Vision of Saint John). Prior to 1908, El Greco’s artwork was known to as “Profane Love” because of the subject matter. The historian Manuel B. Cossio had reservations about the title and proposed the alternative title “Opening of the Fifth Seal.” The Metropolitan Museum, where the painting is housed, makes the following observation: “the painting is incomplete and heavily damaged and eroded.”

Subject of the painting

The theme of the artwork is derived from the Book of Revelation6:9–11, in which the spirits of martyrs cry out to God for vengeance on their persecutors on the planet Earth. In the front, the exuberant figure of St. John dominates the painting, while in the background, naked souls writhe in a tumultuous storm of passion as they receive white garments of redemption. In 1880, the upper section of the picture was completely destroyed. It is speculated that the missing piece represented the sacrifice lamb breaking open the Fifth Seal of the Covenant.

The remaining half, according to many, symbolizes profane love, whilst the lost top portion, according to others, represents holy love.

Ownership

The piece was passed down to El Greco’s son, Jorge Manuel Theotocópuli, after the artist’s death in 1614. Antonio Cánovas del Castillo, Prime Minister of Spain, was the owner of this property during the 19th century. In 1880, he sought to have the work repaired because he was dissatisfied with the state of it. As a result of the attempted repair, at least 175 centimetres (69 inches) were removed from the canvas’s uppermost point, resulting in the apostle John forcefully pointing nowhere. It was purchased by Ignacio Zuloaga for 1,000 pesetas (US$200) after Cánovas’ death in 1897.

He used the painting as a backdrop for a piece calledMis amigos, which featured numerous important members of the Generation of 1998 in the foreground.

He deemed it to be a “precursor of modernism” because it has “visionary force,” which he attributed to it.

Comparison withLes Demoiselles d’Avignon

Some believe that the Opening of the Fifth Seal served as an inspiration for Pablo Picasso’s early Cubist works, particularly his painting Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, which reflects the expressionistic angularity of the artwork. However, this has not been proven. Painting The Demoiselles d’Avignon during his time in Paris with his friend Zuloaga, Picasso studied El Greco’s painting The Opening of the Fifth Seal while working on the painting. During the early 1980s, when stylistic parallels and relationships between themes in both works were examined, the link between Les Demoiselles d’Avignon and the Opening of the Fifth Sealwas identified as a point of convergence.

  • Once it is realized that Les Demoiselles d’Avignon owes at least as much to El Greco as it does to Cézanne, the picture, according to John Richardson, a British art historian, “turns out to have a few more explanations to provide”.
  • When it comes to the Opening of the Fifth Seal, Foundoulaki says that the contrast between the clothed figure in the left portion of the painting and the nude figures in the right part of the painting represented the conflict between profane and holy love.
  • Richardson, on the other hand, speculates that Picasso was aware of Cossio’s interpretation of the Opening of the Fifth Seal and bases his argument in large part on this speculation.
  • Picasso’s |V and inverted triangles of El Greco, according to Foundoulaki, are identical in shape, and Picasso ingeniously recreated the game with the |V and inverted triangles of El Greco, something he had previously began in The Villagers.
  • Picasso’s harnessing of the spiritual energy of a great religious artist to his own demonic aims is seen by Richardson as the Apocalypse in El Greco’s Opening of the Fifth Sealas the spark that taught him how to harness the spiritual energy of a great religious artist to his own demonic ends.

Picasso, according to Richardson, devoted his whole life in pursuit of this apocalyptic vision.

References

  1. The picture Number 327 is titled De l’Apocalypsis?(fragmento) in his catalogue, and it is also known as “The Vision of Saint John.” retrieved on 2020-07-15
  2. E. Foundoulaki, From El Greco to Cézanne, 116
  3. Michael Scholz-Hänsel, “From El Greco to Cézanne,” 116. Domenikos Theotokopoulos was a Greek painter who lived from 1541 until 1614. The Shock of the Old
  4. R. Johnson,Demoiselles Picasso’s d’Avignon, 102–113
  5. J. Richardson,Apocalyptic Picasso’s Whorehouse, 40–47
  6. R. Laesse,A Source in El Greco for Picasso’s “Demoiselles d’Avignon,” 133–134
  7. AbJ. Richardson,Apocalyptic Picasso’s Who
  • The Adoration of the Magi (1565–1567), the Dormition of the Virgin (1565–1566), and the Healing of the Man Born Blind are all examples of Renaissance art.
  • The Modena Triptych (1567–1569)
  • The Last Supper (1568)
  • The Flight into Egypt (1570)
  • The Annunciation (1570).
  • The Prado was built in 1570
  • Madrid was built in 1575–1576
  • And Illescas was built in 1600–1605
  • Washington was founded in 1570
  • Minneapolis was founded in 1570
  • New York was founded in 1595–1600
  • London was founded in 1600
  • Madrid was founded in 1609.
  • Saint Lawrence’s Vision of the Madonna and Child(1577)
  • Adoration of the Holy Name of Jesus(1577–1579)
  • Disrobing of Christ (El Expolio)(1577–1579)
  • Christ Carrying the Cross(1580)
  • Saint Anthony of Padua(1580)
  • Christ Carrying the Cross
  • New York was founded around 1580
  • Barcelona was founded around 1590–1595
  • And Madrid was founded around 1597–1600.
  • The Martyrdom of Saint Maurice (1580–1582)
  • The Tears of Saint Peter (1582–1590)
  • The Martyrdom of Saint Peter (1580–1582)
  • Barnard Castle, 1580–1589
  • Mexico City, 1587–1596
  • Oslo, c. 1590
  • Barnard Castle, 1580–1589
  • Barnard Castle, 1580–
  • Count of Orgaz’s Burial (c. 1586)
  • Holy Family (c. 1586–1588)
  • Holy Face of Jesus (c. 1586–1595)
  • Saint Peter and Saint Paul (c. 1587–1592)
  • Agony in the Garden (London) (1590)
  • Christ on the Cross Adored by Two Donors (c. 1590)
  • The Penitent Saint Peter (c. 1590–1595)
  • Virgin Mary (Mater Dolorosa)(c.
  • Among the portraits are: Portrait of Vincenzo Anastagi (1571–1576)
  • The Nobleman with his Hand on his Chest(c. 1580)
  • Portrait of a Gentleman(c. 1586)
  • Portrait of an Elderly Man(c. 1587–1600)
  • Portrait of Antonio de Covarrubias(1595–1600)
  • Self-Portrait(1595–1600)
  • Cardinal Fernando Nio de Guevara(c.1600)
  • Portrait of an Unknown
  • The El Greco Museum in Toledo and the Museum of El Greco in Crete are two of the best-known examples of the artist’s work.
  • (son) Jorge Manuel Theotocópuli
  • El Greco (1966 film)
  • El Greco (2007 film)
  • El Greco fallacy

Opening of the Fifth Seal by El Greco – Facts about the Painting

Opening of the Fifth Seal
Artist El Greco
Year 1608–1614
Medium Oil on canvas
Location The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City
Dimensions 88.5 in × 78.5 in
224.8 cm × 199.4 cm
Famous Paintings by El Greco
The Disrobing of Christ, 1577–1579
Opening of the Fifth Seal, 1608-1614
Dormition of the Virgin, 1565-1566
The Burial of the Count of Orgaz, 1586
View of Toledo, 1596-1600
The Adoration of the Shepherds, 1612–14
Christ Healing the Blind, c. 1570
The Entombment of Christ, c.1570
St. Martin and the Beggar, 1597-1599
Complete Works

El Greco’s painting The Opening of the Fifth Seal was completed during the artist’s final years on the planet. This well-known masterwork was also known as The Vision of Saint John or theFifth Seal of the Apocalypse, depending on who you ask. Saint John the Baptist Church, which was located just outside Toledo, was to have it on display at the side altar, according to the plan. Profane Love was the name given to this magnificent artwork by El Greco prior to the year 1908. However, there were some reservations about the painting’s official title, so Cossio came up with the alternative title “Opening of the Fifth Seal.” At the moment, the artwork is on display at the Metropolitan Museum, where reviewers have noted that the painting looks to have been abraded and severely damaged.

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Subject and Theme

The Book of Revelation serves as the inspiration for the painting’s topic. There are souls of all martyrs who have been tormented represented in it, and they plead with God for His justice upon the salvation of their persecutors on earth. As with the other seals, the opening of the Fifth Seal is dominated by the euphoric figure of Saint John, who fills the whole painting. Behind this figure are naked souls who are awarded with the white garments of glory and redemption from God, and they are overcome with an incredible outpouring of emotion as they get their rewards.

Nevertheless, the bottom portion appears to be a copy of another altar piece by El Greco, which was titled The Concert of Angels (The Concert of Angels).

The majority of commentators feel that the piece of the painting that has survived depicts profane love, whereas the portion of the picture that has been lost depicts holy love.

Additional Facts

During the nineteenth century, the artwork was in the possession of Antonio del Castillo, who served as Prime Minister of Spain. Unfortunately, he was upset with the painting’s poor state, and in the 1880s he ordered that it be repaired. The artwork was cut by around 175 cm by the restoration team, which resulted in John the Evangelist seeming to be looking in the wrong direction. As a result of the painting’s unusual look, various reviewers were captivated by it, which helped to establish the painting’s reputation within contemporary modernist groups.

The emergence of the Fifth Seal is also seen in the backdrop of Zuloaga’s paintingMis Amigos, which depicted various members of the illustrious Generation of ’98 in a group portrait.

After then, the Zuloaga Museum sold the picture to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, where it is currently on exhibit.

It represents a specific chapter from the Book of Revelation that describes the Opening of the Fifth Seal.

Revelation 6:1–6:13 Despite the fact that there was a missing section in the upper region of the artwork, it is still considered to be one of the best pieces of art ever created throughout history.

Great Works: The Vision of St John, 1608-14, By El Greco

Paintings that are left incomplete might be due to a variety of factors. This fact has the potential to convert them into enigmas. The reasons for their abandonment might be as diverse as they are numerous: death may have interfered, or something as mundane as a more important assignment; the artist may have had a creative block of some sort; a patron may have become cold. In the case of several of JMW Turner’s late paintings, we simply do not know if the current state of these works was intended by the artist; he did not always inform us.

  1. When the master wrested something from nothing, his fans (and intimidated opponents) were treated to the awe-inspiring spectacle of the master creating something from nothing – much like God actively at work on his creation.
  2. It is possible that we will never learn why this painting by El Greco is most likely unfinished.
  3. So much of what takes place is by chance.
  4. Why should we take an eccentric mediocrity seriously?
  5. Degas and Rainer Maria Rilke, the renowned poet and former secretary to Auguste Rodin, both sensed something quite remarkable in him, as did Rodin himself.
  6. The intensity of El Greco’s colors, his unusually elongated figures, and that wild, visionary glimmer in his eye all contributed to his being regarded as a forerunner of modernism.
  7. It also sparked a desire to portray the notion of the Spanish soul via music.

What Picasso may not have realized is that the fact that this altarpiece is most likely unfinished has endowed it with attributes that it would not have possessed if it had been polished to a greater level of perfection.

John, which is the last book of the Christian Bible.

His fingers appear to be squeezing the paint, as if they were assisting the artist in his wildly chaotic rendition of the night sky.

Seven bare-chested individuals claw at and reach out for the fabric in front of them.

A description is given in the text on how garments are given to the souls of individuals who have been slaughtered for the sake of the gospel.

The fact that this picture has a very raw and ready feel to it would have appealed to the moderns who would have liked it.

There is no heightened polish here, no solid, completely trustworthy, old-masterish, browny dullness of the type that Joshua Reynolds attempted to replicate with his treacly, undryable bitumen.

The areas are ill-defined, the distances are fanciful, and difficulties of perspective have been scattered to the four winds of the world.

Touching this artwork gives the impression that it is still in the process of being created.

In order to achieve this, paintings should appear provisional – think of Peter Doig’s works, which are polished just enough but never too much.

Old-fashioned illusionism comes seem as stale, as if it were a type of fakery.

It’s hard to believe that these gesticulating, nude bodies, those sky-tumbling, backwards-somersaulting putti-like angels, and the rest of the cast are more than three quarters done.

They appear to be seen through a haze of strong light, the brightness of the visionary moment just before everything becomes apparent.

Furthermore, during its “repair” in 1880, the whole structure was cruelly cut down.

“It’s all right,” we say to ourselves.

a little bit about the artist: Domenikos Theotokopoulos is a Greek politician (1541-1614) Born on the island of Crete, Domenikos Theotokopoulos (nicknamed “The Greek”) studied iconography and became an icon painter in the Byzantine tradition.

He lived in Toledo for the most of the rest of his life, where he produced many of his most notable works of art.

Until the beginning of the twentieth century, he was regarded as a mediocrity, but he was suddenly recovered by the moderns as a forerunner of what they were attempting to do at the time.

Opening of the fifth seal (The vision of Saint John the Divine), c.1610 – El Greco – WikiArt.org

Many distinct factors might cause paintings to stay incomplete. Their existence as a mystery can be explained by this fact. Many factors might have contributed to their abandonment, including death or something as simple as a more important client request. The artist could have had a creative block of some sort, or the patron’s interest may have dwindled as time passed. With regard to several of JMW Turner’s late paintings, we simply do not know whether the current state of these pieces was intended by the artist; he did not always tell us whether it was purposeful.

  1. When the master wrested something from nothing, his fans (and intimidated opponents) were treated to the awe-inspiring spectacle of the master creating something from nothing – much as God was hard at work on his creation.
  2. This artwork by El Greco may never be completed, and we may never know why.
  3. Accidentally, a lot of things happen.
  4. What’s the point of taking a mediocre with a quirky personality seriously?
  5. Both Degas and Rainer Maria Rilke, a brilliant poet and former secretary to Auguste Rodin, noticed something really remarkable in him, and so did many others.
  6. Intensity of color, bizarrely elongated figures, and a wild, visionary glint in El Greco’s eye were all aspects that contributed to his being regarded as a forerunner of modernism.
  7. It also sparked a desire to portray the concept of the Spanish soul via music.

However, what Picasso may not have realized is that the fact that this altarpiece is most likely unfinished has endowed it with characteristics that it would not have had if it had been polished to a greater level of perfection.

On the far left, the preacher himself appears to emerge out of his own shimmeringly columnar form, as if reaching for the heavens in a heavenly aspiration.

Green, yellow, and pink swaths of material appear to writhe and ripple as if they were alive, as if they were aspiring to the state of shapelessness that only water can achieve.

How does one go about defining it, and what is the aim of it?

Thus, this altarpiece might be seen of as a form of comfort for the congregation.

No holds barred, this is a hurried and temporary gesture that was thrown together on the spur of the moment.

The spaces are ill-defined, the distances are fanciful, and concerns of perspective have been scattered to the four winds of the universe.

By touch, it appears like this artwork is still in the process of being created.

Think of the paintings of Peter Doig, which are polished just enough but never too much; they exemplify what we are looking for in paintings.

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Traditionalism, as a form of fakery, feels stale and out of touch.

It’s hard to believe that these gesticulating, nude figures, those sky-tumbling, backwards-somersaulting putti-like angels are more than three quarters of the way finished.

It’s as if we’re seeing through a fudgy mist of strong light, the light of the visionary moment, just before everything starts to become clear.

Moreover, during its “repair” in 1880, the whole structure was mercilessly cut down.

In our minds, it’s a positive sign.

More information on the artist is available at the following link: Theotokopoulos, Domenikos (1541-1614) Born on the island of Crete, Domenikos Theotokopoulos (nicknamed “The Greek”) studied iconography and became an icon painter.

A large portion of his remaining life was spent in Toledo, where he created many of his most notable works of art. At the beginning of the twentieth century, he was regarded as mediocre at best, but he was quickly recovered by moderns as a model for all they were attempting to achieve.

El Greco (Doménikos Theotokopoulos) – Fifth Seal of the Apocalypse. (Vision of St.John)

Paintings might be left incomplete for a variety of reasons. This fact has the potential to transform them into enigmas. The reasons for their abandonment might be as diverse as they are numerous: death may have interfered, or something as mundane as a more important assignment; the artist may have encountered a creative block of some sort; a client may have become cold. In the case of several of JMW Turner’s late paintings, we simply do not know whether the current state of these pieces was intended by the artist; he did not always inform us.

  1. When the master wrested something from nothing, his admirers (and intimidated opponents) were treated to the awe-inspiring spectacle of God busy at work on his creation.
  2. We may never be able to determine why this picture by El Greco is most likely unfinished.
  3. So much of what happens is by chance.
  4. Why should we take a mediocre eccentric seriously?
  5. Degas, as well as Rainer Maria Rilke, the famous poet and former secretary to Auguste Rodin, sensed something quite remarkable in him.
  6. The intensity of El Greco’s colors, his strangely elongated figures, and that wild, visionary glimmer in his eye all contributed to his being regarded as a forerunner of modernism.
  7. It also sparked a need to communicate one’s perception of the Spanish spirit.

This altarpiece’s unfinished state, which Picasso may not have realized, has endowed it with aspects that would not have been there if it were polished to a greater level of perfection.

John, which is the last book of the Bible.

His fingers appear to be squeezing the paint, as if they were assisting the artist in his crazily chaotic rendition of the sky.

Seven bare-chested creatures grab at and reach for the fabric.

Those who have died in the name of God’s message are awarded garments, according to the Bible.

The fact that this picture has a very raw and ready feel to it would have appealed to the moderns.

There is no heightened polish here, no firm, completely trustworthy, old-masterish, browny dullness of the type that Joshua Reynolds tried so hard to replicate with his treacly, undryable bitumen.

However, it is the work’s fascinating atmosphere that grabs us by the scruff of the neck.

And this is precisely what we, as postmoderns, find so appealing about it.

We’d want to be reminded that paintings are created objects.

As a result, there is a great deal of flatness – or nearly flatness – in this area.

Whole lips, hands, and chins are sanded away – or are left unpainted – in the process.

We enjoy the sensation of being on the verge of something big, surrounded by bodies that appear to be advancing towards their complete identities, their entire shapeliness.

A large chunk of the upper sky has been eliminated entirely.

We really appreciate the way the sky appears to be closing in on St John’s wriggling fingers.

Before he was twenty, he relocated to Venice, where he studied under Titian, and subsequently to Rome.

He spent the most of the remainder of his life in Toledo, where he produced many of his most notable works of art. Until the beginning of the twentieth century, he was regarded as a mediocrity, but he was suddenly recovered by the moderns as a forerunner of what they were aiming to achieve.

The Vision of Saint John by El Greco (Domenikos Theotokopoulos)

Doménikos Theotokópoulos, better known by his stage name El Greco (“The Greek”), was a Greek painter, sculptor, and architect who worked during the Renaissance period in Spain. In the Kingdom of Candia (modern Crete), which was at the time a part of the Republic of Venice and a hub of Post-Byzantine art, El Greco was born in the year 1564. He trained and became a master within that tradition before coming to Venice at the age of 26, following in the footsteps of other Greek painters. As early as 1570, he relocated to Rome and set his shop there, producing a number of works.

In 1577, he relocated to Toledo, Spain, where he remained and continued to paint until his death in 1602.

El Greco’s dramatic and expressionistic style was first viewed with skepticism by his contemporaries, but by the twentieth century, it had gained widespread acceptance.

Modern academics have described El Greco as an artist who is so apart from other artists that he does not belong to any one school of thought.

Who painted The Vision of Saint John?

That was the artist who created The Vision of Saint John?

The Vision of Saint John:

Painting known as The Vision of Saint John, also known as The Opening of the Fifth Seal, was painted in the early 1600s and is a notable piece of artwork. Original plans were for the oil painting to be finished for the church of the Hospital of Saint John the Baptist in the Spanish city of Toledo. The artwork depicts St. John with a group of souls who are pleading with God. A narrative from the Book of Revelation served as inspiration for the artist.

Answer and Explanation:

The Famous Spanish Artists from Chapter 14/Lesson 6 are listed below. When we learn a language, we also gain an understanding of the culture that is associated with that particular language. This course introduces you to several well-known Spanish painters as well as associated terminology, allowing you to talk about their works and approaches.

Explore our homework questions and answers library

Find out more about ObjectCreative Commons LicenseDescription1571 results ProvenanceCreditDescription On the Greek island of Patmos, Jesus’ youngest disciple John had a vision that was recorded in the New Testament, which is known as the Apocalypse, or Book of Revelation. The inspired saint, armed with his pen, book, and the eagle as his symbol, raises his eyes to the heavens, where he sees the lady dressed in the sun and standing on the moon, besieged by the seven-headed serpent (Revelation 12:1-4).

The church had been renovated after it was entrusted to the Conventual Franciscan Friars in 1738, at which point it was dedicated.

403, which includes pages 513-514.

Credit The Massarenti Collection was acquired by Henry Walters in 1902, and the painting is attributed to him.

Master of the Vision of Saint John

Between between 1450 and 1480, this unnamed painter was active in Cologne, Germany. His given name comes from a great panel painting of The Vision of Saint John that hangs in the Vatican (Wallraf-Richartz-Museum, Cologne). Stange was the first art historian to construct a collection of works centered on this figure, whose style demonstrates the influence of the so-called Master of the Darmstadt Passion. Stange’s group of works was the first of its kind in the world. In addition to the panel in Cologne listed above, four more panels depicting episodes from the Legend of the True Cross have been credited to his hand as well.

Additionally, he is claimed to have created the panel depicting Saint Cosmas, Saint Damian, and Saint Pantaleon at the Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum in Madrid, as well as another panel in the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio.

The style of this artist is reminiscent of the Cologne School of the second half of the 15th century, with its characteristically rigid figures and echoes of the work of Stefan Lochner in the use of pigments and bright colors.

Additionally, the style of other creative centers in the Netherlands may be found in his work as well.

El Greco Paintings, Bio, Ideas

In this huge painting, which measures three and a half meters wide by over five meters high, El Greco achieves global acclaim as the artist’s biggest and most famous achievement. It was commissioned by the parish priest of Santo Tomé in Toledo, and it is widely regarded as a prominent example of Mannerism in its time period. El Greco is regarded as one of the most important Mannerist artists, among artists such as Tintoretto, Agnolo Bronzino, Jacopo da Pontormo, and others. His contribution to the evolution of the movement is defined by visual compositions that, through the use of form, imagination, and expression, moved away from an idealized perfection and into a world fraught with tension and emotional complexity.

  1. According to popular mythology in Toledo, the Count of Orgaz was a devout and kind man who died and donated an enormous quantity of money to the church.
  2. Towards the bottom of the picture, a burial scenario is depicted, with the Count flanked by the two saints, followed by other noblemen and clergymen dressed in 16th-century attire and depicted in a static manner.
  3. Jorge Manuel, the artist’s son, is claimed to be the small kid on the left side of the painting.
  4. Earth is depicted in normal size with figures that are more proportionate, but heaven is made of whirling clouds and abstract patterns, with people that have a more ethereal aspect to them and are depicted in a larger scale.
  5. Vida Hull, an art historian, has another interpretation, claiming that the painting symbolizes “a visionary experience,” which she believes the artwork represents.
  6. Burial scenes were frequently represented as a major religious motif in art throughout history.

In addition to El Greco’s Burial at Ornans (1849), other well-known works of art depicting funerals include theBurial at Ornans (1849) by Gustave Coubert, theBurial of the Sardine (1812-1819) by Francisco Goya, and theBurial of St. Lucy(1608) by Caravaggio.

Opening Of The Fifth Seal By El Greco – Top 10 Facts

As one of his final works, one of the most amazing paintings by a Greek-born painter of the late Spanish Renaissance was also one of his most stunning paintings. Doménikos Theotokópoulos (1541-1614), better known by his nickname “El Greco,” was a Greek painter who lived from 1541 to 1614. During his career, he produced a number of distinctive and famous works, and this picture is a perfect illustration of the artist’s inventiveness. Let’s take a closer look at some of the most intriguing facts about El Greco’s painting ” The Opening of the Fifth Seal,” which is considered to be one of the artist’s most spectacular works of art.

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1. It was painted for a church in Toledo, Spain

The picture is thought to portray a scene from the Book of Revelation 6:9–11, according to the artist. Death is represented by a group of individuals in the backdrop, who are pleading for justice against their earthly persecutors. To the nude figures, white garments are placed on them as a sign of redemption. In the same manner as El Greco’s classic “View of Toledo,” which represents his city, the backdrop appears dismal and chaotic, and was painted in the same technique. What’s noteworthy about this picture is that it was formerly known as ” Profane Love” before it was renamed in 1908.

The artwork is also known by the title ” The Vision of Saint John,” which refers to the figure of Saint John the Baptist who dominates the left-hand portion of the work.

3. A large part of the painting was cut during a 19th-century restoration

Immediately at first glance, it becomes apparent that something is missing from the artwork. Because of this, Saint John on the left looks to be pointing and looking nowhere in particular in the sky, and there is a very solid explanation for this. For much of the second half of the nineteenth century, the artwork was in the possession of Spanish Prime Minister Antonio Cánovas del Castillo (1828-1897). After nearly three centuries, the hues of the picture had noticeably faded at that point. Therefore, in 1880, Cánovas attempted to have the painting repaired; as a result, 175 centimeters (68.9 inches) of the upper portion of the picture was chopped away.

courtesy of Antonio Cánovas del Castillo / Wikimedia

4. The upper part might have resembled another work by El Greco

Until the twentieth century, the artwork was known to as ” Profane Love ” primarily because it was considered that the painting had a twofold significance. ” Profane Love,” according to popular belief, might have been symbolized by the bottom half that we can see presently, whilst the higher part could have represented ” Divine Love.” If that’s the case, some historians speculate that it would have looked similar to another fragmentary work by El Greco known as ” Concert of Angels,” a painting that goes back to roughly the same era in 1608 and is also a half work by the artist.

El Greco’s “Concert of Angels” (Concert of Angels) / Wikimedia Commons

5. The painting can be admired in a famous museum in New York City

6.As you can see from the photograph inside the museum, the artwork is rather huge, especially considering that over half of it has been removed from its frame. The reason for this is that it was commissioned to paint the whole altar wall of a church in Toledo, Ohio. In terms of size, the oil on canvas painting measures 224.8 x 199.4 cm (88.5 x 78.5 inches). • Even while some sources claim that the artwork’s dual nature depicts the union of profane and divine love, there is an alternative interpretation for what the upper half of the painting could have shown.

This implies that it might have resembled the center panel of the Ghent Altarpiece in appearance.

An image from Wiki Commons showing a detail of the lam on the Ghent Altarpiece 8.

That’s the equivalent of only $200, which is a pittance compared to what the job is currently worth.

It is due of Zuluoga that the oeuvre of the Greek-born artist has been “rediscovered,” and interest in his works has grown throughout Europe as a result.

In the twentieth century, Ignacio Zuloaga was the catalyst that catapulted El Greco’s fame.

Despite the fact that Zuloaga died in 1945, his heirs erected a museum in his honor in the Pedraza Castle in Segovia, Castilla y Leon, which is known as the ” Museo Zuloaga “.

In 1956, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York purchased the picture from this museum for a sum of $500,000.00.

Pablo Picasso was almost definitely viewed El Greco’s artwork on a visit to Paris at the beginning of the twentieth century.

This artwork is a part of the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, and it is widely regarded as the most expensive painting on display in a museum today!

Saint John the Evangelist on Patmos

  • Oil on panel, c. 1553/1555, by Titian and his workshop, taken from the ceiling of the Scuola di San Giovanni Evangelista. Gallerie dell’Accademia, Venice. Under the auspices of the Ministry of Health, Cultural Activities, and Tourism, this establishment is open to the public. The National Galleries of the Academia di Venezia are housed in the Museo Nazionale Gallerie dell’Accademia di Venezia. The Photographic Archive is a collection of photographs. G.A.VE Compare Image
  • Reconstruction of the ceiling of the Scuola di San Giovanni Evangelista by Silvia Gramigna Dian, fromTitian, Prince of Painters(Venice, 1990), 276Compare Image
  • Reconstruction of the ceiling of the Scuola di
  • Jürgen Schulz’s article, “Titian’s Ceiling at the Scuola di San Giovanni Evangelista,” Art Bulletin48 (1966):91 mentions this in a document from 1789 that was referenced in the article. In addition, Wolfgang Wolters,Plastische Deckendekorationen des Cinquecento in Venedig und im Veneto(Berlin, 1968), 56
  • Francesco Sansovino,Venetia citta nobilissima et singolare.(Venice, 1581), 101
  • Carlo Ridolfi, Le maraviglie dell’arte, overo Le vite de gl’illustri zione According to Sandra Moschini Marconi,Gallererie dell’Accademia di Venezia, Vol. 2: Opere d’arte del secolo XVI(Venice, 1962), 262
  • Francesco Zanotto,Pinacoteca della I R Academia Veneta di Belle Arti(Venice, 1834), 2:n.p
  • Sandra Moschini Marconi,Gallererie dell’Accad Similarly, Stefania Mason, “Intorno al soffitto di San Paternian: gli artisti di Vettore Pisani,” in Jacopo Tintoretto nel quarto centenario della morte: Atti del convegno international di studi (Padua, 1996), 71–75, points out that the outstretched arms of Titian’s figure correspond to an earlier conception of God the Father by Michel Titian’s ceiling of the Scuola di San Giovanni Evanghelio (Venice, 1956)
  • Wilhelm Suida, “Miscellanea Tizianesca, II,” Arte veneta10 (1956): 74–75 (just before the ceiling of the Santo Spirito)
  • Sandra Moschini Marconi, “Gallerie dell’Accademia di Venezia, Vol. 2: Opere d’arte del secolo X Peter Humfrey, Painting in Renaissance Venice (New Haven and London, 1995), 274
  • Charles Hope, in Titian, ed. David Jaffé (London, 2003), 21
  • And Paul Joannides, “On Some Borrowings and Non-Borrowings from Central Italian and Antique Art in the Work of Titian, c. 1510–c. 1550,” in Titian, ed. David Jaffé, (London, 2003), 21
  • And Charles Hope, in In addition, see Paul Joannides, “Titian and Michelangelo / Michelangelo and Titian,” in Patricia Meilman’s The Cambridge Companion to Titian, ed. Patricia Meilman (Cambridge, 2004), 139–140
  • And Peter Humfrey, Titian: The Complete Paintings (Ghent and New York, 2007), 277. Fisher was the only prior researcher to have dated the painting to a period later than 1550
  • Nevertheless, he provided an attribution to Palma Giovane that was deemed inappropriate. See, for example, M. Roy Fisher, Titian’s Assistants During the Later Years, PhD diss., Harvard University, 1958 (New York, 1977), 62–66
  • Carlo Ridolfi,Le maraviglie dell’arte, overo Le vite de gl’illustri pittori veneti, e dello stato (Venice, 1648), ed. Detlev von Hadeln (Berlin, 1914

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