Who Is The Patron Saint Of Eyes

Saint Lucy

Frequently Asked Questions

Who was St. Lucy?

St. Lucy, an Italian saint In the fourth century, Saint Lucia (died 304 in Syracuse, Sicily; feast day, December 13), a virgin and martyr, was one of the earliest Christian saints to gain broad fame, having a large following before the fifth century. She is the patron saint of the city of Syracuse (Sicily), as well as the patron saint of virgins. As a result of many legends linking her name with light, she came to be known as the patroness of sight, and she was represented by medieval artists holding a dish containing the eyes of the Virgin Mary.

She chose to remain a virgin in the tradition of St.

  • An enraged suitor denounced her to the local authorities in Rome, who condemned her to be transferred to a brothel and forced into prostitution as a punishment.
  • She was then sentenced to death by fire, however she proved to be resilient to the heat of the fire.
  • St.
  • In Syracuse, Italy, a statue of St.
  • Photograph by Valentina5000/Fotolia In reality, Lucy was most likely a victim of the wave of Christian persecution that occurred late in the reign of the Roman emperor Diocletian and resulted in her death.
  • Evidence of her early reputation may be found in the fact that two churches dedicated to her were known to have been built in Britain before the 8th century, at a period when the country was still mostly pagan.
  • Lucy is commemorated in a number of ways through a range of rituals.
  • Lucia’s Day marks the beginning of the Christmas season.
  • The festival’s purpose is to convey hope and light to those who are experiencing the darkest time of the year.
  • Lucia St.
  • Photograph courtesy of Elena.Degano/Shutterstock.com Those in charge of editing the Encyclopaedia Britannica Melissa Petruzzello was the author of the most recent revision and update to this article.

The Patron Saint of Eye Problems – The Story Behind St. Lucy

Italicized St. Lucy In the fourth century, Saint Lucia (died 304 in Syracuse, Sicily; feast day, December 13), a virgin and martyr, was one of the earliest Christians to gain great fame, having a large following even before the fifth century. Syracuse (Sicily) and virgins are both patronized by her, and she is known as the “Virgin Queen.” Her name was associated with light in a variety of religions, and she was represented by medieval artists holding a dish containing her eyes, thereby earning her the title “patron of sight.” Lucy came from a wealthy Sicilian family, according to mythical accounts.

  1. Agatha, refusing to marry or acquire worldly possessions.
  2. Lucy was rendered immobile and unable to be dragged away, according to mythology, as a result of the intervention of the gods.
  3. Eventually, a blade penetrated her neck, and she died as a result of her injuries.
  4. During a Santa Lucia festival in Syracuse, Italy, a statue of St.
  5. Photo courtesy of valentina5000/Fotoland.
  6. There are references to her in early Roman sacramentaries, and an inscription dated 400 CE at Syracuse mentions her.
  7. A number of events are held to commemorate St.
  8. Christmas festivities officially begin in Sweden on St.
  9. An evergreen wreath adorned with candles is usually worn by the eldest daughter of the family on this day, and she is dressed in a white gown.
  10. The feast of St.
  11. Lucia’s Day is celebrated by a little girl, who has a lighted wreath on her head and a tray full of traditional Swedish delicacies in her possession.

The image above is courtesy of Elena.Degano/Shutterstock. In the Encyclopaedia Britannica, the editors write about: Melissa Petruzzello has made the most recent revisions and additions to this page.

Prayer to Saint Lucy

This prayer to Saint Lucy is intended primarily for those seeking treatment for eye difficulties as well as for the healing of one’s spirit. Years ago, I was involved in an automobile accident that resulted in several lacerations to my face, including a laceration to my left eye. After two eye operations, I was still blind in my left eye, which had ten sutures in the shape of a ‘V’ in it. I grew accustomed to live with one eye that allowed me to see clearly. When I discovered that my right eye was growing a Pterygium some years later, I was taken aback.

  1. Despite the fact that surgery was a possibility, the eye surgeon was hesitant to proceed because of the dangers.
  2. Another alternative was to have the cornea in my left eye replaced, but I did not have the financial means to do so.
  3. In my distress, I prayed, and it was around that time that I came upon the Saint Lucy Prayer for Help.
  4. My left eye was initially completely closed, and I couldn’t see anything at all.
  5. After then, there are blurred forms, colors, and moving things.
  6. When the printed paper is brought very near to my face, however, I am able to see hazy letters for the first time.
  7. I am aware that God has the ability to cure me in a second, but I have faith that God has excellent reasons for taking His time that I do not comprehend.
  8. I also know that Saint Lucy is interceding for me, specifically for the healing of my soul, which I am grateful for.
  9. The feast day of Saint Lucy is celebrated on December 13th, and it was on that day that I was fortunate enough to come upon the prayer to Saint Lucy.

Prayer to Saint Lucy

Saint Lucy is a saint who is venerated in the Catholic Church. Your lovely name means ‘LIGHT,’ and God has blessed you with the light of faith; may this light of faith, which God has given to you, expand and sustain His light in my spirits so that I may escape evil. Be diligent in the pursuit of good deeds, and despise nothing more than the blindness and darkness that come with wickedness and sin in our lives. Please, through your prayer with God, get for me perfect eyesight for my physical eyes, as well as the grace to utilize them for God’s greater honor and glory, as well as the redemption of souls.

  • Lucy, virgin and martyr, please hear my prayers and grant me the requests I make of you.
  • I also used the Prayer to Saint Lucy to pray for my friend Sue, who was undergoing eye surgery at the time of writing this post.
  • She then had visual loss in that eye.
  • Sue contacted me a few months later to tell me that she had fully recovered from the operation and had restored full vision in the affected eye.
  • She is a virgin as well as a martyr.
  • The above prayer to Saint Lucy is my personal favorite, despite the fact that there are other other prayers to Saint Lucy.
  • The explanation for this is that her mother was healed as a result of the faith and assistance of St Lucy.
  • Persecution of this nature occurs in a variety of settings, including schools, colleges, workplaces, and even individuals’ own homes.

Learn more about the life of Saint Lucy by reading her biography. Visit ourCatholic-Prayers.html to learn about further prayers. From Prayer to Saint Lucy’s Feast Day go back to the home page Family-Prayer.org Return to the home page for Family Prayer.

Our Patroness

Saint Lucy of Syracuse is a saint who lives in Syracuse, New York. Her feast day is celebrated throughout the West on December 13, which coincides with the longest night of the year according to the unreformed Julian calendar; she is also known as the patron saint of the blind. She is one of seven women, with the exception of the Blessed Virgin Mary, who are specifically mentioned in the Canon of the Mass.

Contents

  1. Saint Lucy of Syracuse, patron saint of the blind and eye disorders, is invoked in prayer. Saint Lucy of Syracuse is invoked in this prayer. I offer a second prayer to Saint Lucy of Syracuse. Prayer (III) to Saint Lucy of Syacuse

Life

Lucy is derived from the same Latin root as lux, which meaning “light.” Ironically, the history of St Lucy is buried in mystery: the only thing that is known for definite about her is that she was a martyr in Syracuse, Italy, during Diocletian’s persecutions in A.D. 304, and that she died there. Her adoration expanded to Rome, and by the 6th century, the entire Church had come to admire her for her heroism in defending the Christian religion. A number of tales arose as a result of the desire to shed light on Lucy’s courage, which are documented in the Acta that are linked with her name.

  1. Her father, a Roman, died when she was a child, leaving her and her mother without a protective figure to turn to.
  2. Lucy had a vision in which Saint Agatha appeared to her and told her, “Soon you will be the glory of Syracuse, just as I am of Catania.” Eutychia was cured at that same moment.
  3. Eutychia agreed, and the wedding took place.
  4. When Lucy’s rejected pagan fiancé came forward to condemn her as a Christian in front of the magistrate Paschasius, the magistrate ordered her to make a sacrifice to the Emperor’s image.
  5. Even if you were to force me to make an offering against my will by raising my hand to your idol, I would remain guiltless in the eyes of the true God, who judges according to the will and understands the heart of every person.
  6. You will not be able to bend my will to your will; whatever you do to my body will not be able to happen to me.
  7. They were forced to abandon her.

Her eyes were gouged out as a final form of torture. She was amazingly still able to see despite the fact that she had lost her sight. Throughout history, St. Lucy has been shown with her gaze fixed on a golden platter in paintings and monuments. She is known as the “Patron Saint of the Eyes.”

Legend

It is an instance of Lucy’s passion that has remained the most vivid in the minds of her devotees since the Middle Ages: being ripped out of her eyes. Note that another narrative places her eye loss prior to her martyrdom, alleging that she “cut her eyes out and sent them to him, begging to be left in peace afterward” in response to a suitor who appreciated her lovely eyes. Traditionally, Lucy was shown in Gothic art carrying a dish with two eyes on it. Lucy’s eyes are restored by God at the conclusion of the fable.

  • She has given Virgil the responsibility of guiding Dante through Hell and Purgatory.
  • Dante, on the other hand, clearly admired Lucy, as evidenced by his placement of her beside Adam in the Mystic Rose in Canto XXXII of the Paradiso.
  • She sacrificed her own eyes in order to remain chaste, a significant sacrifice for which God rewarded her with a set of even more beautiful eyes.
  • She was venerated as the patroness of the city of Syracuse.
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Prayers

Saint Lucy, you did not bury your light beneath a basket, but rather allowed it to shine brightly for all to see throughout the world and throughout the centuries. We may not be subjected to torture in our everyday lives in the same manner that you were, but we are nonetheless required to let the light of our Christian faith to illuminate our daily lives as well. Allow us to have the confidence to incorporate our Christian beliefs into our job, our leisure, our relationships, our conversation—in every aspect of our lives.

Amen

Prayer to Saint Lucy of Syracuse patroness of the blind and of eye problems

The light of Saint Lucy was not hidden behind a basket, but was made visible to the entire world, and was visible for all time. Despite the fact that we may not be subjected to torture in our daily lives in the same manner that you were, we are nevertheless obligated to let the light of our Christian faith to illuminate our everyday lives. Please help us to have the courage to incorporate our Christian faith into every aspect of our lives, including our job, pleasure, relationships, and conversation—in every part of our day.

Prayer to Saint Lucy of Syracuse

Your heroic rejection of huge promises and resistance to various dangers in order to remain true to your loving Lord are commemorated in Eucharistic Prayer I, which is said in honor of you by the Church.

Christians have called your name for ages, particularly when they are suffering from eye problems. As a result, we are requesting your aid on their behalf. We also pray that you instruct us on how to mimic you and how to prevent any form of spiritual blindness. Amen.

Prayer (II) to Saint Lucy of Syracuse

Saint Lucy, your beautiful name denotes the presence of light. I implore you, by the light of faith that God has placed upon you, to grow and maintain this light in my spirit so that I may avoid evil, be eager in the accomplishment of good acts, and despise nothing more than the blindness and darkness of evil and sin. Please, through your intercession with God, grant me flawless eyesight for my physical eyes, as well as the grace to utilize them for God’s greater honor and glory, as well as the salvation of all mankind.

My prayers are addressed to Saint Lucy, virgin and martyr, who I implore to hear my prayers and grant my pleas.

Prayer (III) to Saint Lucy of Syacuse

Dearest God, our Creator and Redeemer, mercifully hear our prayers that, as we venerate Thy servant, Saint Lucy, for the light of faith thou didst bestow upon her, Thou wouldst vouchsafe to increase and to preserve this same light in our souls, that we may be able to avoid evil, to do good, and to abhor nothing more than the Blindness and the darkness of evil and of sin. Amen. As we rely on Thy goodness, O God, we humbly pray that Thou wouldst grant us perfect vision through the intercession of Thy servant, Saint Lucy, so that our eyes may serve for Thy greater honor and glory, as well as for the salvation of our souls in this world, and that we may be able to enjoy the unfailing light of the Lamb of God in paradise.

Thank you.

A patron saint for eye ailments

St. Lucy is a saint who is venerated in the Catholic Church (died c. 304) The feast day is on December 13th. Depending on whatever version of the narrative you favor, St. Lucy came to be known as the patron saint of eye disorders. According to one tale, the executioner tore out her eyes when she was being executed as a martyr. In another version, a pagan suitor praised Lucy on the beauty of her eyes, prompting her to remove them from her sockets and give them to him as a gift. An alternative explanation is the name Lucy, which is derived from the Latin word for brightness and is hence less gruesome.

  • Lucy is one of the four famous virgin martyrs of the early church, together with St.
  • Agatha, and St.
  • As is the case with so many of the ancient martyrs, very little information about St.
  • Lucy.
  • Lucy to fill in the gaps in the historical record.
  • Lucy’s father had died by the time she was approximately 20 years old, and her mother, Eutychia, had been suffering from a persistent hemorrhage for some years.
  • Agatha in Catania in the hopes of finding a cure, the mother and daughter journeyed.

Agatha appeared to Lucy in a dream, revealing herself to her as the martyr.

Agatha, who addressed her as “sister” and informed her that her mother had been healed.

Eutychia was thrilled the next morning to discover that she had been healed of her illness.

Eutychia consented, and the mother and daughter returned to their hometown of Syracuse, where they dispersed Lucy’s dowry to the less fortunate among the population.

Lucy’s fiancé went to the local court and accused her of being a Christian.

When the soldiers attempted to drag Lucy away, she remained immobile, as if she had been supernaturally anchored to the spot.

After ordering his slaves to pile wood around Lucy and burn her where she stood, the magistrate was surprised to see that the flames never reached her.

Even then, she remained until a priest arrived to administer Holy Communion to her for the final time.

Agatha.

It’s conceivable that this is a true story from St.

Tom Craughwell is the author of Saints Behaving Badly, This Saint Could Change Your Life, and St. Peter’s Bones: The Story of How the Relics of the First Pope Were Lost and Found.Then Lost and Found Again. He lives in New York City. Arlington Catholic Herald (Arlington, VA) 2016

St. Lucia of Syracuse, Patron Saint of Eye Diseases and Writers

St. Lucy was born into a pagan family in the third century A.D in Syracuse, a city in modern day Sicily. Lucy became a Christian while she was still a young girl. Her mother tried to arrange a marriage for her with a wealthy pagan, but this horrified the young girl. Lucy knew her mother could not be swayed by a young girl, so she devised a plan to convince her mother that she should not marry and should instead devote her life to Christ.After several prayers at the tomb of the Christian saint Agatha, that night Lucy saw the saint in a dream. The saint told Lucy that her mother would fall sick and that the illness would be cured through the young girl’s faith. Lucy’s mother did fall sick and was subsequently cured by her daughter’s prayers. Lucy, after this, was able to persuade her mother to give her dowry money to the poor and to receive permission from her family to commit her life to God as a nun.While Lucy and her mother were grateful to God, the rejected bridegroom was deeply angered, and denounced the young girl to the Roman governor. At this time, Christians were being persecuted throughout the Roman Empire. The Emperor Diocletian had decreed that all Christians had to renounce their faith or face death. The governor attempted to force Lucy into a brothel, as punishment for her faith.However, the guards who came to take her away were unable to move her, even after they tried to drag her away by hitching her to a team of horses. The soldiers were afraid of the governor, andpersisted in trying to drag the girl away, but they failed. Enraged, they gouged her eyes out. Then they decided that they would have to kill the girl. The guards heaped wood around the young girl, but it wouldn’t burn, so, enraged, they finally stabbed her with their swords. Lucy finally died.When her body was being prepared for burial, they discovered that her eyes had been restored. St. Lucy’s body was interned at Catania, but was later removed to her native Syracuse. She has been revered as a saint for almost two thousand years. Because her eyes were restored, she has long been revered by those who are blind or have visual impairments.In 1981, thieves stole all but her head, but police were able to recover them on her feast day.The bravery and steadfastness of St. Lucy is a source of comfort to Catholics around the world, especially to those afflicted with blindness.
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Patron saints for the blind: Raphael, Lucy and Odilia of Alsace

Blindness affects a large number of individuals all around the world. Blind individuals, on the other hand, are no less capable than everyone else. For the blind, faith is a crucial aspect in their lives. Faith assists them in navigating in areas where they cannot see. They are protected by their faith from threats that they do not foresee. Faith assists them in achieving greatness in the same way that anybody else does. Blind individuals can see in their minds and hearts when they have faith in God and the saints.

  • When faced with life’s problems, blindness should serve as a source of strength.
  • Saints Lucy, Raphael, and Odilia are the patron saints of the visually handicapped.
  • in the Roman Empire.
  • Her feast day is celebrated on the 31st of December.
  • As a result, Saint Lucy is known as the patron saint of the blind and anyone suffering from eye problems.
  • Raphael is one of just three angels who are specifically mentioned in the Bible.
  • Tobit’s blindness was restored by Raphael.

The memorial for Raphael is celebrated on September 29th, together with the memorials for the Archangels Michael and Gabriel.

It is possible for persons who are blind to achieve mental clarity via trust in Raphael.

Despite the fact that she is not a patron saint of the blind, Odilia embodies all that a person suffering from vision problems may be experiencing.

Her father had rejected her and had abandoned her to be raised by peasants when she was a child.

She went on to create a monastery in her birthplace, complete with a hospital, which she named after her father.

On the 13th of December, we will commemorate her life.

It is possible that you will have difficulty adjusting to your blindness, but this is not the case. Ask for direction and clarity from Lucy, Raphael, and Odilia via prayer. T. Oder is a euphemism for Thomas Oder (St-Writer)

About Saint Lucy

The feast day of our patron saint is on December 13th! Saint Lucy (Santa Lucia) was a young virgin martyr who lived in Syracuse, Sicily (Italy) in the late 200s A.D. and was executed in 304 A.D. She was a young virgin martyr who lived in Syracuse, Sicily (Italy) in the late 200s A.D. The discovery of a tomb dating to the 4th century at Syracuse, with an inscription stating that it belonged to St. Lucy, was made possible by excavations (her relics were removed hundreds of years after her death and are believed to currently be in Venice, Italy).

  1. Lucy in terms of factual knowledge.
  2. Lucy’s narrative dates back to the late 400s and is included in the Acts of the Martyrs, which suggests that she had already gained widespread acclaim at that point.
  3. Despite the fact that the legends differ slightly, the underlying element in all of them is that St.
  4. In response, he reported her as a Christian to the police, who attempted to take her to a prostitution house and, when they were unable to physically transfer her, to burn her — an effort that was also a failure.
  5. Lucy’s life to an end by stabbing her in the throat with a knife or a sword.
  6. It is reported that this occurred as a result of her pagan suitor’s admiration for her gorgeous eyes.
  7. St.

She is revered as the patron saint of the visually impaired.

Lucy gave wheat and food to the impoverished and homebound, as well as potentially to Christians who were sleeping in the catacombs, frequently in the middle of the night to avoid being discovered by authorities.

As a result, the lamp and a wreath of candles have become emblems of St.

As a result, the light that has long served as a symbol of our church was born.

Lucy’s feast day, ships loaded with wheat arrived at harbors in a number of various sites throughout Italy, including Sicily, and saved the people from starvation and famine.

Lucy, a Sicilian tradition based on this account calls for the preparation of a soup and a dessert made with wheat berries.

Lucy, Christmas wheat is planted in a pot (indoors) and allowed to grow.

Furthermore, according to Scandinavian mythology from the Middle Ages, a boat was seen floating across Lake Vannern on the darkest day of the year during a terrible famine in southern Sweden, during which time people were forced to flee their homes.

Lucia stood at the apex of the ship, clad in white and glistening with an otherworldly brightness.

Traditions associated with St.

Other traditions associated with St.

Lucy of Syracuse in Hartford, CT) to the Midwest (Sicilian Italian-based St.

John’s Lutheran Church in Sacramento, CA).

Lucy as the carrier of Christ’s light amid the darkness of winter is incorporated into all of the customs from her feast day (Dec.

It is difficult to separate fact from fiction in the case of our patron saint, but one thing is certain: this third-century Christian dedicated her life to Christ and others.

“The correct words will not be lacking for God’s servants, for the Holy Spirit speaks through us.

Lucy wrote it.

Lucy: Red denotes a martyr.

Light in color (yellow/orange).

WheatPalm branch (a symbol of the martyr’s triumph over evil) References and resources include the following: Lucia: Saint of Light is a novel written by Katherine Bolger Hyde.

PRAYER TO ST LUCY, PROTECTOR OF THE EYES

O St Lucy, you chose to have your eyes torn out rather than deny the faith and defile your soul, and God, in an extraordinary miracle, replaced them with another pair of sound and perfect eyes as a reward for your virtue and faith, appointing you as the protector against eye diseases in the process. I come to you in order for you to protect my vision and to heal the illness that has developed in my eyes. O St Lucy, keep the light in my eyes so that I can see the wonders of creation, the radiance of the sun, the vibrancy of the flowers, and the joy on the faces of the children.

St.

St.

Amen!

ST. LUCY

Lucy is derived from the same Latin root as lux, which meaning “light.” Ironically, the history of St Lucy is buried in mystery: the only thing that is known for definite about her is that she was a martyr in Syracuse, Italy, during Diocletian’s persecutions in A.D. 304, and that she died there. Her adoration expanded to Rome, and by the 6th century, the entire Church had come to admire her for her heroism in defending the Christian religion. A number of tales arose as a result of the desire to shed light on Lucy’s courage, which are documented in the Acta that are linked with her name.

  1. Her father, a Roman, died when she was a child, leaving her and her mother without a protective figure to turn to.
  2. Lucy had a vision in which Saint Agatha appeared to her and told her, “Soon you will be the glory of Syracuse, just as I am of Catania.” Eutychia was cured at that same moment.
  3. Eutychia agreed, and the wedding took place.
  4. When Lucy’s rejected pagan fiancé came forward to condemn her as a Christian in front of the magistrate Paschasius, the magistrate ordered her to make a sacrifice to the Emperor’s image.
  5. Even if you were to force me to make an offering against my will by raising my hand to your idol, I would remain guiltless in the eyes of the true God, who judges according to the will and understands the heart of every person.
  6. You will not be able to bend my will to your will; whatever you do to my body will not be able to happen to me.
  7. They were forced to abandon her.
  8. Her eyes were gouged out as a final form of torture.

She was amazingly still able to see despite the fact that she had lost her sight. Throughout history, St. Lucy has been shown with her gaze fixed on a golden platter in paintings and monuments. She is known as the “Patron Saint of the Eyes.” Please, St. Lucy, intercede for us!

St. Lucy – Saints & Angels

Lucy’s biography has been lost to time, and the only thing we know for definite about this heroic lady who lived in Syracuse during the persecution of Christians in the early fourth century is that she died as a result of the persecution. Mary adoration expanded to Rome, and by the sixth century, the entire Church had come to admire her for her bravery in the defense of the religion. Legends began to emerge as a result of people’s desire to shine light on Lucy’s bravery and determination. That which has stood the test of time is the narrative of a young Christian woman who made a pledge to devote her life to the service of Christ when she was young.

  1. Lucy had a dream about seeing Saint Agatha after several hours of devotion at the tomb of Saint Agatha.
  2. Agatha’s promise that her disease would be cured through faith.
  3. Despite the governor’s attempts to compel her into defiling herself in a brothel, the guards who arrived to remove her were unable to move her, even after tying her to a team of oxen.
  4. Despite the fact that the specifics of her life are unclear, it is commonly accepted that Christians were persecuted for their beliefs throughout her lifetime.
  5. Despite the fact that the facts surrounding her death are simply tales, it is the only thing on which modern-day Christians may rely.
  6. Lucius, according to subsequent versions, warned Paschasius that he would face consequences.
  7. During the process of preparing her body for burial, it was discovered that her eyes had been restored.
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In 972, Emperor Otho I had it brought to Metz and placed in the cathedral of St.

The fate of her remains following its stay at St.

Thieves took everything but her head in 1981, but authorities were able to retrieve the items on her feast day.

Lucy is the patron saint of the blind, and her name can imply “bright” or “clear” in several languages.

In art, she is sometimes represented with her eyes held open by a golden plate, and she is also depicted clutching a palm branch, which is a sign of victory over evil.

We may not be subjected to torture in our everyday lives in the same manner that you were, but we are nonetheless obligated to let the light of our Christian faith to illuminate our daily lives, as you were.

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Saint Lucy – Early Christian Martyr – Patron Saint of Eyes

Lucy dedicated herself to God and remained loyal to her pledge of purity, despite the horrendous pain she endured. During the Mass, she is one of seven ladies who are mentioned. The first known narrative of Saint Lucy’s life is found in the Acts of the Martyrs, which dates back to the fifth century. Lucy was born into an affluent family of noble parents in Syracuse, Sicily, in the year 283 A.D., according to legend. She was the daughter of aristocratic parents. Due to the fact that her feast day is near to the longest day of the year, her name derives from the Latin word lux, which means light, and she is frequently described to as a light in the darkness.

Lucy and her mother were left without a legal guardian as a result of this.

Her Heavenly Promise

Lucy dedicated herself to God and remained faithful to her pledge of purity, despite the horrendous suffering she endured during her consecration process. During the Mass, she is one of seven ladies who are named. The Acts of the Martyrs, written in the fifth century, is the first known account of Saint Lucy’s life. Lucy was born into an affluent family of aristocratic parents in Syracuse, Sicily, in the year 283 A.D., according to legend. She was the daughter of noble parents. Due to the fact that her feast day is near to the longest day of the year, her name derives from the Latin word lux, which means “light,” and she is sometimes described to as “a light in the darkness.” It is thought that Lucy’s father was a Roman lord, but nothing is known about him other than the fact that he died when Lucy was around five years old, according to tradition.

  • 3/4 stick butter
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 1 teaspoon saffron threads, crushed
  • 2 packages dry active yeast
  • 1 sprinkle salt
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 7-8 cups flour
  • Raisins for decoration

AdvertisementDirections:

  • In a large mixing basin, combine the flour, yeast, salt, and sugar. Melt the butter in a saucepan. Pour in the milk and let it to cool to ambient temperature or slightly warmer (approximately 100o F). Add the saffron to the heated milk and stir well. It should change color to a golden yellow
  • It should be mixed into the flour and then added to the eggs, which should be mixed well with a wooden spoon. Cover and let aside for 1 1/2 hours. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees. Spray a nonstick baking pan with nonstick cooking spray
  • Transfer the dough from the bowl to a lightly floured surface and knead it for a few minutes. Because it will be sticky, use only a small amount of flour. Toss together the dough and divide it in half, then cut each half into fourths, then fourths again
  • Work with the dough portions that have been left over. Each bun should be shaped into a curled “S.” Decorate with raisins if desired. Allow them to rest for approximately fifteen minutes beneath the towel. The buns should be egg washed. Bake at a high temperature for approximately eight minutes, or until golden but not brown
  • Remove the buns from the oven and set them aside to cool under a cloth. Then, store them in a plastic bag or freeze them as soon as possible because they will dry out rapidly if not stored properly. This recipe makes approximately 30 buns.

Using a large mixing basin, combine all of the dry ingredients (flour through yeast). Set aside to cool a bit. Add the milk and allow it to cool to room temperature or a little warmer (approximately 100o F) before serving. Warm the milk and stir in the saffron. Ideally, it should turn a rich gold color; It should be mixed into the flour and then added to the eggs, which should be thoroughly mixed with a wooden spoon. Cover and let aside for 1 1/2 hours. 475 degrees Fahrenheit is the temperature in the oven.

Using your hands, transfer the dough from the bowl to a lightly floured table and knead it for a few seconds.

Dividing the dough in half and then cutting each half into four pieces, and then four pieces again; Create something out of the dough fragments you’ve collected.

Raisins can be used to decorate.

Buns should be egg washed.

Immediately after that, place them in a plastic bag or freeze them since they dry out rapidly. Approximately 30 buns are made with this recipe.

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