Who Is The Patron Saint Of Beer

Meet The Many Catholic Patron Saints Of Beer

“Beer came into the world as a result of the sweat of man and the love of God.” Amen. If you’re familiar with the Catholic Church in any manner, you’ll know that it doesn’t shy away from the consumption of alcoholic beverages. The Church is no stranger to the fruits of fermentation, as seen by the use of wine in the Mass and the numerous charitable monks that made, lived on, and generously shared so many vats of beer throughout the centuries. The fact that there were so many patron saints of beer was something we didn’t realize (some more official than others).

Assuming you have the enunciative ability to pray at the conclusion of your brewing or drinking session, we’ve compiled a list of names you should be familiar with.

We group them together since their beer-related miracles are frequently mistaken with one another.

(In reality, flea bites spread plague; drinking beer, on the other hand, more than likely averted cholera outbreaks, for which we’d be forever grateful, no doubt.) Don’t let a drop pass you by!

Thank you to Nobility.org for providing the image of Saint Arnold of Metz.

This source also cites a similar story about Arnold of Metz, who was buried at the abbey of the same name: villagers returning to retrieve his body were thirsty after their journey, but there was little beer at the abbey; a devout village called out to “Blessed Arnold” to “bring us what we lack,” and the beer miraculously refilled the tank.

  • The one thing that can be said with certainty is that Arnold of Soissons is notably known as the patron saint of hop pickers and is credited with inventing the usage of apiary apparatus in the brewing industry.
  • There was a Saint Brigid of Ireland who lived in the 5th Century (apparently a good friend of Saint Patrick, about whom we still cherish many misconceptions every March 17 th).
  • But there’s also evidence of a similar enthusiasm for craft beers.
  • If the angels of Heaven were to be drinking it throughout time and space, I’d be delighted.” It’s important to remember that there are no hangovers in paradise.
  • However, according to at least one narrative, Nicholas of Myra was traveling in incognito through Turkey when he came upon three passengers who had been robbed and killed.
  • In terms of the Santa link, the feast of Saint Nicholas of Myra is held on December 6th, with children receiving little gifts and candy.
  • Additionally, there is an account of him tossing three sacks of riches down the chimneys of destitute young ladies in exchange for dowries, which brings us even closer to the Santa link.

Another connection between Christmas and brewing saints: Saint Wenceslas of what was then Czechoslovakia was known for more than a few good deeds during his lifetime.

Since his death (at a very early age) at the hands of his brother, the Czech people have venerated him and his fierce preservation of their native hops.

Saint Augustine of Hippo is the patron saint of beer drinkers, and he is also the patron saint of brewers (now part of Tunisia).

After his conversion, Augustine changed his whole way of life, living as holy as he possibly could until his death at the age of 76.

Those early years, when Augustine was having a good time, are presumably what brewers and consumers turn to in times of need; after all, even a life devoted to beer may have its redeeming qualities.

* Arnold is the spelling used in English, however both saints are commonly referred to as Arnuf in other languages. Originally published on July 8, 2016.

5 Patron Saints of Beer

“Beer came into the world as a result of the sweat of man and the love of God.” – St. Arnulf of Metz, a medieval saint Beer, how I love thee. This delicious drink is one of life’s greatest pleasures, as well as an unmistakable symbol of God’s enormous love for us and the rest of creation. Beer, which has been brewed by monks for centuries, has always had a tight association with Catholicism. As a matter of fact, Holy Mother Church has demonstrated her affection for this beverage by including an official beer blessing into the texts of the Roman Ritual.

  • 1.
  • Arnulf of Metz (Metz, France) – The patron saint of breweries, St.
  • Arnulf was a bishop and counsellor to King Theudebert II of Austrasia around the eighth century.
  • The expedition took place at an unusually hot period of the year, and the travelers were on the verge of passing out from dehydration.
  • Fortunately, their beer supply was restored and was plenty to sustain them till they got home.
  • Gambrinus is not a saint in the traditional sense of the term.
  • St.

Others claim he learnt the craft of brewing from the gods, while others just claim he was a guy who drank copious volumes of beer in a short period of time.

3.

Augustine – The Doctor of Grace is the patron saint of a variety of things, not the least of which is people who are involved in the craft of beer making.

4.

Luke the Evangelist –Yes, this is the same St.

From goldsmiths and lace manufacturers to sculptors and everything in between, this holy man is a patron saint for everyone.

Thank you in advance for any information you may provide on the connection between St.

The fifth saint is St.

for his heroic almsgiving and compassion for the outcasts of society. This noble monarch may be familiar to you due to the fact that his holy life is commemorated in song, but you may not have realized that he is also the patron saint of brewers until now. You have it now.

Conclusion

Brewing has long been seen as a noble and respectable art form, and over the years, numerous brew masters have sought the assistance of saintly patrons in order to further their artistic endeavors. Whether you’re interested in learning how to make beer at home or simply enjoy it, you can’t go wrong by praying for the intercession of these holy men. Cheers! Our colleagues at The Catholic Gentleman have graciously allowed us to reproduce their essay in its entirety.

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Antique Beer Photos:Dozens of prints available in a variety of sizes up to 40×50.
Saints of Suds (“When The Saints Go Malting In”)by The Brews Brothers (Steve Frank and Arnold Meltzer)� Steve Frank and Arnold Meltzer. Reprint by permission only.How did important religious personages become the patron saints of suds? The bishops of brewers? The apostles of ale? Both universal and local Saints have reportedly performed miracles, either during their lives or afterwards, that involved the working class people and beer. Other saints were designated because they represent beer producing and consuming regions.Centuries ago beer was the daily drink of the people, both because plain water was often polluted and due to beer’s inexpensive, nourishing qualities. Monks brewed beer for themselves as a safe source of hearty sustenance. Monk’s meals were frugal at best, particularly during fast periods. However, consumption of liquids did not break the fast. Without widespread hotel chains, monasteries served as inn’s for travelers who shared the monk’s provisions, especially their robust, sustaining beers. Eventually, the monk’s were able to also sell their beers at pubs called klosterschenken, and a flourishing trade developed. To build brand loyalty, the names of the monastery’s patron saint was used. To this day many beers bear the name of a saint.The procedure which the church uses to name a saint, called canonization, has only operated since the tenth century. Prior to that, since the first century, saints were chosen by public acclaim. While this may have been fairer to the general public, it included information that was both legend or fictitious, and eventually the Vatican assumed the authority for approving saints. Among the patron saints of brewers, four are extremely well known: Augustine of Hippo, Luke the Apostle, Nicholas of Myra (also known as Saint Nicholas, or Santa Claus) and the Good King Wenceslas, the latter two also providing a linkage to the winter season of merriment.Augustine of Hippo, now part of Tunisia (born 354 AD, died 430 AD) was known for wild living and significant alcoholic beverage consumption prior to his conversion. His complete turnaround and life of moderation contributed to his becoming a patron saint of brewers.Nicholas of Myra, Turkey is believed to have lived in first half of 4th century, and died between 342 and 350 AD. St. Nicholas is associated with the legend of the Three Clerics, a drama about 3 church scholars who stopped for lodging at an inn, where the innkeeper slew them for their money. A disguised Nicholas invoked God’s help to resurrect them and, by doing so, became a protector over travelers and brewers.Saint Luke (first century) is widely regarded as a patron saint of brewers although there is no obvious reason. Possible connections include his being a physician and knowing that the beer of the time was healthier than the water of the time, and his ability to mix various herbs together for medicines just as they were mixed for beer.Other saints who are considered patron saints of brewers but for which we have not found any apparent connection are Saint Barbara (d.235); Saint Medard of Noyon (b. 470, d. 560); and Saint Adrian (b. 303) who is widely recognized as a patron saints of beer and his feast day is celebrated with reveling throughout Europe. St. Veronus reported to be a patron saint of Belgian brewers, does not appear in the church liturgy. St. Veronus, the patron saint of Lambeek, a town famous for a unique style of beer, is a local saint who gained national appeal.Saint Wenceslas (b. 907, d. 929) promoted the spread of Christianity in Czechoslovakia. Wenceslas became famous through a Christmas carol by J.M. Neale, “Good King Wenceslas”, which has little to do with history but more with Victorian ideals. Because Bohemian hops were so valued, Wenceslas ordered the death penalty for anyone caught exporting the cuttings and obviously endeared himself to the local hop growers and brewers. He became the patron saint of Bohemia and Czechoslovakia and his crown became the symbol of nationalism for the Czechs. By extension he became a patron saint of Czech brewers. There also was King Wenceslas II in the 13th century, who convinced the Pope to revoke an order banning the brewing of beer, again endearing the Wenceslas name to local brewers.King Gambrinus is revered by many brewers as a patron saint. According to folk tales, Gambrinus was King of Flanders. Reputed to have invented hopped, malt beer, the legendary Gambrinus may have actually been Jan Primus (John I, 1251-1294), Duke of Flanders, Brabant, Louvain, and Antwerp. Primus, according to the Encyclopedia of Beer, is credited with introducing the toast as a custom. Some others attribute Gambrinus to Jean Sans Peur (John the Fearless, 1371-1419), known as Ganbrivius. Although there is no evidence of him among the church listings of saints, Gambrinus, called the “King of Beer”, continues to be celebrated by brewers as a patron saint.Probably the best known Irish saint after Patrick is Saint Brigid (b. 457, d. 525). Known as “the Mary of the Gael,” Brigid founded the monastery of Kildare and was known for spirituality, charity, and compassion. St. Brigid also was a generous, beer-loving woman. She worked in a leper colony which found itself without beer, “For when the lepers she nursed implored her for beer, and there was none to be had, she changed the water, which was used for the bath, into an excellent beer, by the sheer strength of her blessing and dealt it out to the thirsty in plenty.” Brigid is said to have changed her dirty bathwater into beer so that visiting clerics would have something to drink. Obviously this trait would endear her to many a beer lover. She also is reputed to have supplied beer out of one barrel to eighteen churches, which sufficed from Maundy Thursday to the end of paschal time. A poem attributed to Brigid in the Brussel’s library begins with the lines “I should like a great lake of ale, for the King of the Kings. I should like the family of Heaven to be drinking it through time eternal.”Saint Amand (b. 584, d. 679) primarily operated in the regions now considered northern France and Belgium. He established a score of monasteries, many of which probably produced beer. Considered the father of Belgian monasticism, he is associated with the centers of wine growing and beer brewing. Because of his reputation for hospitality, Amand also is a patron saint of beer and wine merchants.Another patron saint in Belgium, Arnold of Soissons (b. 1040, d. 1087) is specifically considered the patron saint of hop pickers. He often is confused with Saint Arnold of Metz and the same miracles, therefore, are associated with both of them depending on the source. Other names for the various Arnolds include Arnulf, Arnou, Arnulphus, and Arnoldus, depending on the language in which the name is spoken.Following the collapse of the roof of an abbey brewery in Flanders, the good Saint Arnold of Soissons asked God to multiply the stores of beer which were left for the monk’s consumption. When Arnold’s prayer was answered in abundance, the monks and townspeople were prepared to canonize him on the spot. While Arnold of Soissons is best known for his miraculous provision of beer, he is also credited with a most practical improvement upon the brewing process. While weaving bee skeps for the abbey’s apiary, the abbot realized that the straw cones could be used as a filter to further clarify the brother’s beer. In remembrance of this contribution to the brewer’s art, the good saint is often portrayed-as on the certificates of the Belgian Brewers Confederation-in the company of bees with one hand resting upon a bee skep.Arnold of Soissons also is considered the patron saint of hop pickers because of the region in which he preached. Hops originated in Brabant region of Belgium. They became more widespread when a Belgian princess married a Kentish prince and the dowry included land across from the Affligem brewery. Belgians reportedly sent the first hops to England for use in making beer.”Don’t drink the water, drink beer” warned Saint Arnold of Metz (b. 580 AD, d. 640), concerned about the dangers of drinking impure water. He believed that the polluted water caused illness, while the boiled and processed water used for beer was a safer alternative. According to legend he ended a plague when he submerged his crucifix into a brew kettle and persuaded people to drink only beer from that “blessed” kettle. He is reported to have said “From man’s sweat and God’s love, beer came into the world”.There are multiple versions of a tale about his providing beer to the people. The story is told of porters moving his body after building a tomb for his relics/bones for people to visit. A tired porter overcome with heat uttered a plea to God for a cool refreshing beer. No sooner had this request been made than copious amounts of cold beer shot out of the casket they carried, drenching all and quenching their thirst.The third Saint Arnold connected to beer is Arnou of Oudenaarde. St. Arnou’s main claim to beer fame is that he successfully appealed to God for cold beer for the soldiers to drink during a battle in Flanders in the 11th century. Certainly a person we would want on our side. He also is said to have been able to multiply beer into vast quantities through blessing and prayer.Saint Benedict (b. 480, d. 547), the father of Western monasticism, is best known for establishing the Benedictine order and monasteries, and for a set of rules which defined the standards for life in a monastery. These rules, which were followed by most European monasteries, included providing for visitors or passersby who would eat or drink what the monks did. Eventually many of these monasteries sold their beers to the public, and retained the names of the saints from the abbeys.Saint Boniface of Mainz (b. 680, d. 754) is also known as Wynfrith or Winfrid. He was born in Devonshire, England but spent most of his religious life teaching and preaching in Germany, especially in the areas of Bavaria, Thuringia, Franconia, and Hesse where he founded a number of monasteries. He became a patron saint of Germany and, by extension, of brewers.A missionary to the Germans in the areas near the Lake of Zurich, St. Columbanus (b. 612) came upon an assembly of pagans making ready a sacrifice with a large tub filled with beer in their midst. He asked them what they intended to do with it and they answered that it was an offer to their god Wodan. St. Columbanus blew upon it (possibly with a beer breath), and immediately the vessel burst into splinters with a great noise and all the beer was spilled. The barbarians were surprised, and said he had a strong breath. He then explained to the assembled that they were wasting good ale and his God loved ale, but only when drunk in his name. He exhorted them to forsake their superstitions and return to the faith. Many were converted and baptized; others, who had been formerly baptized, and had apostatized, returned to the obedience of the gospel. He is known for saying “It is my design to die in the brew-house; let ale be placed to my mouth when I am expiring so that when the choir of angels come they may say: ‘Be God propitious to this drinker.'”While not yet considered a patron saint of beer, Saint Cuthbert (c. 636, c. 687), Bishop of Lindisfarne, may be the best option for a patron saint of maltsters. During his final years, in retreat on the Island of Farne, Cuthbert was only able to sustain himself by growing barley. He also became a protector of the barley by invoking the name of God to disperse the birds who hungered to consume the barley.Saint Florian (b. 700) is reputed to have saved Nurnberg, Germany from burning in a great fire in the 8th century. It is not clear if he used the beer or the stored water from a brewery to extinguish the fire. Fires often happened at night, when people made fires for warmth. A nearby brewery would have been an obvious source of liquids, both water and beer, since water would have been drawn to settle out for the next day’s brewing.Hildegard von Bingen (b. 1098, d.1179) was a benedictine nun, the Abbess of Diessenberg, and a well known herbalist, mystic and musician. Although she has not yet been canonized, she has been beatified and is considered a saint by many people. Hildegard was a highly enlightened woman who overcame social, cultural, and gender barriers and became an advisor to bishops, popes, and kings. She used the curative powers of natural objects for healing, and wrote treatises about natural history and medicinal uses of plants, animals, trees and gemstones. Her writings include the earliest known reference to using hops in beer “(Hops), when put in beer, stops putrification and lends longer durability.”Saint Lawrence (d. 258) was an archdeacon of the Roman church during the reign of Pope Sixtus II in the third century. According to the Brewery Museum in Bamberg, Germany, which has Lawrence as its patron saint, his putative method of martyrdom is the reason for his relationship to brewers. Lawrence was strapped to a gridiron and slowly roasted over an open flame. This made him a patron saint of various occupations that use fire including cooks, bakers, innkeepers, laundresses, and firemen. Brewers have a particular affinity for Lawrence because his method of martyrdom reminds them of how malt is dried. In Bamberg, the brewers’ guild required young brewers to carry his likeness in processions and make donations to the church on his feast day. Saint Dorothy (d. 311) of Cappadocia, now part of Turkey, is another patron saint of brewers who was similarly tortured by being stretched on an iron bed over flames.For many centuries, brewers have invoked the names of patron saints to bless and protect their beers. Since the early brewing process was not well understood, often times the batch of beer was not fit for drinking. The poor quality was mystically blamed on evil spirits and specifically on “brew witches” or “beer witches.” The last known burning of a beer witch was in the late 1500s. Now that we have vastly improved beer quality, when you quaff your next pint, consider the saintly company with which you are associating and who may be looking over you. May the Saints bless your pint.
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Patron Saints of Beer

People have relied on higher powers to keep their treasured brews secure for thousands of years on the basis of the maxim “it’s better to be safe than sorry.” It wasn’t enough to merely pray in the Western world, which means that somewhere there’s a whole bar full of Christian saints, all of them have been named patrons of brewers and the brewing industry. Some of the most well-known of them are Augustine of Hippo, Luke the Apostle, Arnold of Metz, Good King Wenceslas, and Saint Nicholas of Myra, often known as Father Christmas or Saint Nicholas.

Despite this, religion continues to have an impact on beer and brewing, with people all around the world reverently drinking Trappist beers like as Orval and Sint-Sixtusas as if they were secreted by the saints themselves.

The list of saints, abbeys, monasteries, and biblical figures is nearly limitless.

When The Saints Go Marching In

Saint Augustine of Hippo was born in 354 when Hippo was a part of Tunisia, under the reign of the Roman Empire. In his early years, he was a bit of a loose cannon, well-known for his wild ways and a more than healthy fascination with alcoholic beverages. He then came to see the truth, and from then until his death at the age of 76, he had a very holy and healthy life. However, his early enthusiasm for a fine beer was enough to compel brewers to seek his approval when they sought a patron saint for their establishment.

  1. Myra is located in Turkey, and it is thought that Nicholas resided there during the first part of the 4th century AD.
  2. The characters were resurrected thanks to the intervention of Nicholas, who was disguised as a brewer, and as a consequence, he gained notoriety as a defender of travelers and brewers, likely due to the fact that the entire scene took place in a pub.
  3. Nicholas of Myra has been observed by youngsters in both Holland and Belgium since the 15th century in a manner that has nothing to do with beer.
  4. Father Christmas in the Anglo-Saxon world (Saint Nick!) derives from the tradition of Nicholas of Myra, as does Father Christmas in the Christian world (Saint Nicholas!).
  5. It’s possible that medieval monks drank beer merely as a result of the poor quality of water available throughout the Middle Ages, something that Luke, as a physician, would have been able to affirm if asked.
  6. When he was in his late 20s or early 30s, he was slain by competitors in a completely unrelated incident that had nothing to do with beer.

He was only in his late 20s or early 30s at the time. Given his role in spreading Christianity throughout his homeland, he was designated as the patron saint of both Bohemia and Czechoslovakia, as well as the patron saint of Czech brewers by extension.

ArnoldArnold

Arnold of Metz was another major believer in the superiority of beer over water, thinking that contaminated water was a source of sickness and that beer was a far better option. It is said he was born around 580 and that one of his stories describes him stopping a plague epidemic by drowning his crucified Christ in a boiling pot and ordering the villagers to drink solely from it. Arnold of Soissons, the third saint on our list, is sometimes mistaken with Arnold of Metz, and many of the same miracles are credited to both of them.

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Saint Arnold of Soissons pleaded to God to augment the remaining beer supplies, and when God granted his request, the villagers proclaimed him a saint immediately.

As a result, he is frequently depicted as being surrounded by bees, with one hand resting on a bee hive, or both.

When a princess from Brabant married a Kentish prince, part of the dowry included land near the Affligem brewery in Brabant, which was a unique arrangement at the time.

More Hops, More Miracles

There have been a slew of other saints who have been enlisted to serve as brewery patrons. Saint Barbara, Saint Medard of Noyon, and Saint Adrian are just a few of the saints who are highly revered across Europe as the patron saints of beer. It is believed that Saint Veronus, patron saint of the Flemish town of Lembeek, is also patron saint of Belgian brewers, despite the fact that this is not officially recognized by the Vatican. Another is King Gambrinus, who is affectionately referred to as the “King of Beer” by his close associates and who, together with Saint Arnoldus, is considered a “big shot” among beer patron saints.

Jan I, Duke of Brabant, who reigned from 1252 until 1294, is thought to have gotten the name ‘Gambrinus’ from the Latin ‘Jan Primus,’ also known as Jan I, Duke of Brabant.

Saint Brigit, the second of the Irish saints after Saint Patrick, is regarded as a charitable woman who enjoyed a good pint of beer.

The lepers begged her for beer, but she didn’t have any, so she blessed her foul bath water, which suddenly transformed into a delicious beer for them to drink.

One of Brigit’s poems, held in the Brussels Library, has the lines “I would like a big lake of ale for the King of Kings.” “I’d like to think that the family of Heaven will continue sipping it for the rest of time.”

Beer saint’s day: Arnold of Soissons

Arnold (sometimes Arnulf) of Soissons, along with Arnulf of Metz (whose feast day is July 18), is perhaps the most well-known patron saint of brewers and hop pickers – but don’t confuse him with the other Belgian beer saint, also named Arnold/Arnulf of Oudenaarde, who is also helpfully known as Arnold/Arnulf of Oudenaarde. Arnold of Soissons, who was born in Brabant around 1040, was a career soldier in his youth, which was not uncommon for many saints – see, for example, St Martin of Tours– and served under Henry I of France in a number of campaigns before entering the Benedictine monastery of St Medard in Soissons.

  • After three years as a recluse, he was elevated to the position of abbot in roughly 1080 – an honor he attempted to evade until heavenly intervention eventually forced his hand, as his hagiography, which has been passed down through generations, relates.
  • During his time at the monastery, he is claimed to have taken to brewing with a zeal, and it is stated that he came up with the concept of clarifying his beer even more by passing it through woven baskets, which he came up with while constructing “skeps” for the monastery’s apiary.
  • Even while it was generally not as powerful as more current brews, beer was as necessary to everyday living as water at the time, and it was typically far healthier for your health.
  • This settlement was built on the edge of salt marshes, which were not recovered until 1173, when the city of Oudenburg was founded.
  • In the course of one especially severe epidemic, Arnold is believed to have advised the local inhabitants to avoid drinking any water at all and instead to consume only beer, which had the beneficial consequence of saving a large number of lives.
  • Following an alleged sequence of miracles both before and after his death, which included (while still alive) asking to God to augment the beer supply of a monastery after a portion of its roof had fallen and ruined the bulk of it, he was canonized in 1121.

He is frequently pictured in armour, wielding a crushing rake, and occasionally with a bee hive nearby, all of which are references to his service as a soldier for both earthly and heavenly forces, as well as his favorite activity and a source of inspiration, respectively.

Beer Saints

It is possible to find a number of saints whose patronage has something to do with beer, brewing, brewing components, or similar activities in the Catholic Church and other related Christian religions. According to my calculations, there are at least 31 and perhaps 32 of them. Please let me know if you are aware of any that I am missing.

Alphabetical List of Beer Saints

  • Abdon is the patron saint of barrel builders and coopers, and his feast day is July 30. The artwork of St. Abdon is on the left, and it is by Jaume Huguet (1459-60) Online resources include: Catholic Online/Lives of the Saints/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia
  • St. Adrian of Nicomedia, patron saint of brewers and the brewers guild of Middle England
  • Feast Days: September 8 (main day)
  • March 4 (secondary day)
  • August 26 (secondary day). Adrien, on the left, with his wife Natalia, with whom he celebrates the feast day of September 8th. Icon by an unknown artist. Links: Catholic Online/Reu/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia
  • St. Amand: Patron saint of bartenders, bartenders’ assistants, and beer merchants
  • St. Amand: Patron saint of bartenders, bartenders’ assistants, and beer merchants (a.k.a. Amandus, Amandus of Elnon or Amantius) The feast day is on February 6th. According to a 14th-century document Patron Saints Index on Wikipedia
  • St. Arnulf, Bishop of Metz, is the patron saint of brewers and is featured on Catholic Online/Saints Alive!/Patron Saints Index on Wikipedia (a.k.a. St. Anou, Arnould, St. Arnold of Metz) The feast day is on July 18th. Links: Catholic Encyclopedia/Catholic Online/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia
  • St. Arnold of Soissons: Patron saint of brewers and hop-pickers
  • St. Arnold of Soissons: Patron saint of brewers, hop-pickers, and distillers (a.k.a. Arnoldus, Arnoul, Arnulf, Arnulphus
  • All of Soissons
  • Birth name: Brabant) Observance of Feast Days: July 8–August 14 Painting in the Museum voor Schone Kunsten in Gent, by an unknown artist (at 1450). Links: Catholic Online/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia
  • St. Arnou of Oudenaarde: Patron saint of beer, Belgian brewers, brewers
  • St. Arnou of Oudenaarde: Patron saint of beer, Belgian brewers, brewers (a.k.a. Arnouldus) Day of the Feast: Unknown The coat of arms of the city of Oudenaarde is seen here. Links:This book is mentioned in Saints of Sudsby Steve Frank and Arnold Meltzer, although there is no citation or acknowledgment to it. Here’s what they have to say: “St. Arnou’s greatest claim to beer renown is that, during a war in Flanders in the 11th century, he was successful in his prayer to God for cool beer for the men to drink. Undoubtedly, he is someone we would want on our team. He is also reported to have been able to increase beer into large amounts by blessing and praying for it.” While cited elsewhere, such as in theDictionary of Beer and Brewing, I have been unable to locate any independent evidence to support the existence of a third St. Arnold (in this case, St. Arnou) who is distinct and separate from the other two, and I have included him here solely for the sake of completeness. St. Augustine of Hippo is the patron saint of brewers and distilleries. Painting by Philippe de Champaigne (1602–1674), commemorated on August 28th. Web Sites to Check Out: Catholic Encyclopedia, Catholic Online/Life of Saints/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia
  • St. Barbara is the patron saint of brewers and distilleries. The feast day is on December 4th. Domenico Ghirlandaio’s painting “The Birth of Venus” (1743) Links: Catholic Online/Lives of the Saints/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia
  • St. Bartholomew: Patron Saint of Mead Drinkers
  • St. Bartholomew: Patron Saint of Mead Drinkers St. Benno is the patron saint of Munich, Germany, and is celebrated on August 24th. Links: Catholic Online/Lives of the Saints/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia
  • St. Benno is the patron saint of Munich, Germany, and is celebrated on August 24th (a.k.a. Benno of Meissen) The feast day is on June 16th. Munich’s Church of Saint Benno, with its stained glass windows. Catholic Online/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia
  • St. Boniface: Patron saint of brewers, German brewers and innkeepers
  • St. Boniface: Patron saint of brewers, German brewers and innkeepers (a.k.a. Apostle of the Germans, Winfrid, Wynfrith, or Wynfryth) Feast Day is on June 5th. Munich’s Church of Saint Benno, with its stained glass windows. The Catholic Encyclopedia/Lives of the Saints/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia are excellent resources
  • St. Brigid is the patron saint of brewers and distilleries (a.k.a. Bride, Bride of the Isles, Bridget of Ireland, Bridget, Brigid of Kildare, Brigit, Ffraid, Mary of the Gael) Feast Day is on February 1st. St. Joseph Catholic Church in Macon, Georgia, has beautiful stained glass windows. Websites to visit: Catholic Online/Lives of Saints/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia
  • St. Columbanus of Ghent: Patron saint of Belgium, brewers, and breweries Feast Day is on February 2nd. Painting by an unidentified artist Celtic Saints
  • St. Cuthbert is the patron saint of maltsters (see related links) (a.k.a. Saint Cuthbert of Lindisfarne) Feast Day is March 20th, and the icon is by an unknown artist. Catholic Encyclopedia/Catholic Online/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia
  • St. Dorothy of Caesarea: patron saint of brewers
  • St. Gregory the Great: patron saint of sailors The feast day is on February 6th (a.k.a. Dora, Dorotea, Dorothea) Painting by an unidentified artist Patron saint of brewers, coopers, and barrel-makers
  • St. Florian is the patron saint of coopers, barrel-makers, and cooperages. The feast day is on May 4th. Painting by Francesco del Cossa (1473)Links:Catholic Online/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia
  • Gambrinus: Patron saint of beer, brewers, and breweries
  • Gambrinus: Patron saint of beer, brewers, and brewers He is technically not a saint, but is revered as one in many parts of the world, particularly Belgium
  • He is also known as King Gambrinus and may have been inspired by either John I, Duke of Brabant (c. 1252–1294) or John the Fearless (1371–1419). The feast day is April 11th, and the painting is by an anonymous artist. Saint George is the patron saint of England, according to the Brookston Beer Bulletin, the Catholic Gentleman, Froth n Hops, Lord of the Drinks, and Wikipedia. The festival took place on April 23, which coincided with the end of the customary Bavarian brewing season. Raphael’s painting is on display (1504-06) The Catholic Encyclopedia/Catholic Online/Lives of the Saints/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia are some useful resources
  • St. Hildegard of Bingen is the patron saint of hop-growers, among other things. The feast day is on September 17th. Painting by an unidentified artist Links:Catholic Encyclopedia/Catholic Online/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia
  • St. Joseph: The customary start of Fruhjahrsbierfest in Munich is marked with a procession of St. Joseph statues. The feast day is March 19, and the painting is by Guido Reni (1635) The Catholic Encyclopedia/Catholic Online/Lives of the Saints/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia are some useful resources
  • St. Lawrence of Rome is the patron saint of brewers and malters, among other things (a.k.a. Laurence, Laurent, Laurentius, Lorenzo) The feast day is August 10th, and the painting is by Francisco de Zurbaran (1660) Catholic Online/Lives of the Saints/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia
  • St. Leonard of Noblac: Patron saint of barrel-makers and coopersporters (also known as Lienard, Linhart, Leonhard, Léonard, Leonardo, Annard), and of coopers in general (also of Limoges or Limousin or de Noblet) The feast day is November 6th. Websites to visit: Catholic Online/Lives of the Saints/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia
  • Saint Luke the Apostle is the patron saint of brewers and distilleries. The feast day is on October 18th. Guercino’s painting is on display (1652-53) Innkeepers, social drinkers, and tavern owners are all patronized by St. Martin of Tours, according to Catholic Online and the Lives of the Saints/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia. Feast Day is November 11th (also known as Martin the Merciful or The Glory of Gaul). Painting by El Greco depicting Martin the Merciful (1597-99) St. Matthew is the patron saint of publicans, according to the Catholic Online/Lives of the Saints/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia. The feast day is on September 21st. Guido Reni’s painting is on display (1575-1642) Online resources include: Catholic Online/Lives of the Saints/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia
  • St. Medard of Noyon is the patron saint of brewers and breweries (a.k.a. Medardus) The feast day is on June 8th. Unknown artist created the central portion of a triptych at the St. Catherine Chapel (circa 16th century) Catholic Online/Lives of the Saints/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia
  • St. Nicholas: Patron Saint of Brewers
  • And sure, it is that St. Nicholas who is our patron saint (a.k.a. Klaus, Mikulas, Nicholas of Bari, Nicolaas, Nicolas, Niklas, Nikolaus, Santa Claus, Sinterklaas) St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated on December 6th. Resources include: Catholic Online/Lives of the Saints/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia
  • St. Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland. The feast day is on March 17th. Painting by an unidentified artist Catholic Online/Lives of the Saints/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia
  • St. Theodotus is the patron saint of innkeepers and is listed in the Patron Saints Index. The feast day is on May 18th. Theodotus on the left, with an unknown artist’s symbol on the right. St. Urban of Langres is the patron saint of coopers, according to the Catholic Encyclopedia, Catholic Online, Patron Saints Index, and Wikipedia. The feast day is April 2nd. Sculpture by an unidentified artist The following are some helpful links: Catholic Online/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia
  • St. Veronus of Lambeek: Patron saint of Lambeek Brewers in Belgium The feast day is on January 31st. Painting by an unidentified artist The following are some useful links: Saints 3s/Wikipedia
  • St. Wenceslas (a.k.a. Vaceslav, Václav, Wenceslaus, Wenzel) of Bohemia: Patron saint of Bohemia and Czech brewers The feast day is on September 28th. Painting at the Wawel Cathedral in Krakow, Poland, by an artist who has not been identified. Catholic Online/Lives of the Saints/Patron Saints Index/Wikipedia are some useful resources.
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By Feast Day

  • The feast of St. Veronus (Belgian Brewers, Lambeek) is celebrated on January 31. The feast days for the Saints are as follows: February 1: St. Brigid (Brewers)
  • February 2: St. Columbanus of Ghent (Belgium, Brewers)
  • February 6: St. Amand (Bartenders, Beer Merchants)
  • February 6: St. Dorothy of Caesarea (Brewers)
  • March 4: St. Adrian of Nicomedia, Martyrdom Day (Brewers)
  • March 5: St. Brigid (Bre St. Patrick (Ireland) is celebrated on March 17
  • St. Joseph (Munich’s Fruhjahrsbierfest) is celebrated on March 19
  • St. Cuthbert (Maltsters) is celebrated on March 20
  • St. Urban of Langres (Coopers) is celebrated on April 2
  • Gambrinus (Beer, Brewers) is celebrated on April 11
  • And St. George (England) is celebrated on April 23. Brewers, Hop-Pickers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Coopers, Cooper

Arnold of Soissons: the patron saint of beer

Arnold of Soissons was born about the year 1040 in the town of Brabant, near Brussels, and was the son of a noble family. He had been training to be a soldier since he was a child, and he eventually served as a soldier under Henry I of France for a short period of time. Then he went to the Benedictine St. Medard’s Abbey in Soissons, France, where he lived as a hermit for the first three years of his life, before returning to the United States. After that, he was given the distinction of being named abbot of the monastery.

  1. Arnold of Soissons is commonly shown wearing a bishop’s miter and wielding a mash rake, which is a medieval tool.
  2. As previously reported, he was coerced into returning to the monastery and accepting the honor by a wolf.
  3. His honors were renewed later, about the year 1080, when he was appointed as bishop.
  4. Rather of battling, Arnold gladly left the monastery and sought to live a more peaceful life in Oudenburg, which he accomplished by founding the Abbey of St.
  5. There, he discovered his true love — the art of brewing beer.
  6. Local peasants were urged to drink beer instead of water, which Arnold gladly provided for them by brewing the beer for them.
  7. This beer recipe expanded across medieval Europe, and it was a popular beverage to consume at breakfast and throughout the day.
  8. Steenbrugge Dubbel Bruin with the photo Arnulf on the label is available.
  9. As a result, many of the residents in the town were able to escape the epidemic because he provided them with his alcoholic beverages.
  10. There were no illnesses in the community.
  11. Here’s another one of our stories: Wine from the 150-year-old Civil War shipwreck Mary-Celestia with notes of crabgasoline is being tasted.

As a result, Arnold is regarded as a saint. He did not make booze, but rather medication. During the “Day of Beer” celebration in Brussels in July, St. Arnold is honored with a parade.

Who Are The Patron Saints of Beer!?

“Beer came into the world as a result of the sweat of man and the love of God.” St. Arnulf of Metz is credited with saying this. I’m sure you’re wondering how significant religious figures came to be designated as the patron saints of beer. Who are the brewers’ bishops? Don’t worry, I’ll explain everything. Beer was the everyday beverage of the people hundreds of years ago. This is owing to the fact that simple water was frequently filthy, as well as the fact that beer was affordable and nutritious.

Monks’ meals were modest at best, especially during fasting periods, and drinking liquids did not constitute a breach of the fast.

Beer and Catholicism have had a long-standing friendship since the beginning of time.

Here is a list of seven holy individuals who have been designated as patron saints of the noble skill of brewing, which is a rare title.

1. St. Arnulf or Arnold of Metz

St. Arnulf of Metz is the most well-known of the brewers who served as his patrons. He served as a bishop and counsellor to King Theudebert II of Austrasia during the reign of that monarch. Following his death at Remiremont Abbey, parishioners from his previous diocese of Metz, who had already come to regard him as a saint, traveled to Remiremont Abbey to claim his remains for burial. The expedition took place at an unusually hot period of the year, and the travelers were on the verge of passing out from dehydration.

Fortunately, their beer supply was restored and was plenty to sustain them till they got home.

2. St. Augustine of Hippo

Among many other things, St. Augustine, Doctor of Grace, is known as the Patron Saint of Brewers. He is the patron saint of individuals who are involved in the craft of brewing. However, while it is unknown how he attained this distinction, it is possible that it was as a result of his great conversion, during which he was converted from a wild, drunken, and dissipated soul into a holy, austere bishop. Why not seek the assistance of St. Anthony if you are frequently intoxicated or find yourself in the sin of gluttony and find yourself unable to stop even though you desire to do so.

3.St. Wenceslaus

He was well-known for his selfless almsgiving and sympathy for the poor and downtrodden. Immediately upon his martyrdom in 935 A.D., St.

Wenceslaus was hailed as a saint. This noble monarch may be familiar to you due to the fact that his holy life is commemorated in song, but you may not have realized that he is also the patron saint of brewers until now. Now you know what I’m talking about.

4. St. Luke the Evangelist

Yes, he is the same St. Luke who is credited with writing the Gospel of Luke. From goldsmiths to lace makers to sculptors, this holy man is the patron saint of them all. He is also a patron saint of brewers, making him the second patron saint of brewers. There isn’t any evident cause for this. Possible connections include his background as a physician and his knowledge that beer was considered to be healthier than water at the time of the incident. He also possessed a strong capacity to combine diverse plants for medicinal purposes, much as they were combined to make beer.

Luke is connected to the brewing industry, I would really appreciate hearing from them.

5. St. Gambrinus

First and foremost, St. Gambrinus is not a legitimate saint. In truth, it’s not clear if he was a genuine person or only a fiction based on historical figures and figures of influence. St. Gambrinus, on the other hand, represents the joyous consumption of alcoholic beverages, and he is even attributed by some as the creator of the beer bottle. Others claim he learned the technique of brewing from the gods, while yet others claim he was merely a guy who drank massive volumes of beer in a short period of time.

6. Nicholas of Myra

Saint Nicholas, often known as Santa Claus, was a Turkish saint who lived in the first part of the 4th century and died between 342 and 350 AD. He is also recognized as the patron saint of children. This Saint is related with the tale of the three Clerics, in which three church academics stopped to stay in an inn, where the innkeeper killed them for the money they had brought with them to stay. A disguised Nicholas appealed to God for assistance in resurrecting them, and as a result, he gained notoriety as a guardian of travelers and brewers.

7. Saint Arnold Of Soissons

This Saint is particularly revered as the patron saint of hop pickers, according to tradition. He is frequently mistaken with Saint Arnold of Metz, who performed many of the same miracles. Having seen the collapse of the roof of an abbey brewery in Flanders, the good Saint Arnold of Soissons petitioned God to augment the supplies of beer that had been left behind for the Monk’s enjoyment. God granted his request. Arnold’s petition had been fulfilled abundantly, and the Monks and citizens of the town were prepared to canonize him on the spot as a result.

Conclusion

There are a number of additional Saints who are associated with beer. Beer, this fortunate drink, is one of life’s greatest pleasures, as well as an unmistakable symbol of God’s enormous love for us and his creation. It has long been seen as a noble and dignified profession, and over the years, many brewers have sought the assistance of holy patrons to further their trade. Whether you’re interested in learning how to make beer at home or simply enjoy it, you can’t go wrong by praying for the intercession of these holy men.

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