Who Is Saint Thomas More

Thomas More

Thomas More, in his whole Sir Thomas More, also known as Saint Thomas More, (born February 7, 1478, London, England—died July 6, 1535, London; canonized May 19, 1935; feast day June 22), English humanist and statesman who served as chancellor of England (1529–32) and was beheaded for refusing to recognize King Henry VIII as the head of the Church of England. Sir Thomas More, also known as Saint Thomas More, (born February 7, 1478, London, England—died July 6, 1535, London The Roman Catholic Church considers him to be a saint and has designated him as such.

Early life and career

Educated at St. Anthony’s in Threadneedle Street, one of London’s best schools, as well as in the household of John Morton, the archbishop of Canterbury and the first Lord Chancellor of England, Thomas More was the eldest son of John More, a lawyer who was later knighted and appointed a judge of the King’s Bench. According to the futurecardinal, who was known for being a discerning judge of character, the bright and attractive page would turn out to be a “marvellous man.” More’s curiosity led him to the University of Oxford, where he appears to have spent two years learning Latin and receiving a good grounding in formal logic.

In February 1496, he was accepted to Lincoln’s Inn, one of the four legal organizations where he was prepared to be called to the Bar of England and Wales.

  1. As long as he had a bottomless curiosity and an extraordinary capacity for effort, he was able to continue his literary endeavors alongside his employment in the law.
  2. More was willing to be disowned rather than violate God’s will, despite the fact that he agreed with his father’s choice that he should pursue a legal career.
  3. More, although being drawn to the Franciscan Order in particular, came to the conclusion that he would best serve God and his fellow men as a lay Christian.
  4. Throughout his life, God remained the focal point.
  5. Non-English visitors, such as the Dutch humanist Desiderius Erasmus, were given permanent rooms in the Old Barge on the Thames side in Bucklersbury in the City of London, which served as More’s home for the first two decades of his married life.
  6. While he was there, Erasmus penned his famous work, In Praise of Folly.
  7. More served as one of the two undersheriffs of London, known as “the pack-horses of the City administration,” from September 1510 until July 1518, when he quit to devote himself totally to the king’s service.
  8. He was left a widower with four children, and he married Alice Middleton, the widow of a London mercer, just a few weeks after his first wife died.
  9. She was many years his senior and had a daughter of her own; nevertheless, she did not have any children of her own.

It is considered to be the first masterpiece of English history. Despite the fact that it was never completed, it had an impact on subsequent historians. More’s portrayal of the tyrant is credited to William Shakespeare, who wrote a play on him.

TheUtopia

In May 1515, More was nominated to a delegation tasked with revising an Anglo-Flemish commercial pact that had been signed the previous year. More utilized to go to other Belgian cities during the extended gaps between the meeting and its location in Brugge. He began writing his Utopia in the Low Countries and finished it after returning to London, where it was first published in Leuven, Belgium, in December 1516. When it came to the audience for whom More wrote it, which included humanists and a select group of government officials, the book was an instant hit.

  1. Photos courtesy of Thinkstock/Photos.com “Utopia” is a Greek word that More coined, fromou-topos (which means “no place”); a pun on the word oneu-topos (which means “excellent place”) is offered in a preface poem.
  2. This state’s order and dignity stood in stark contrast to the unreasonable polity of Christian Europe, which More described in Book I, which was written in England in 1516 and divided by self-interest and greed for power and riches.
  3. It is through the eyes of a mystery traveler, RaphaelHythloday, that the depiction of Utopiais put out in support of his claim that communismis the only remedy for egoism in both private and public life.
  4. Penology, state-controlled education, religious pluralism, divorce, euthanasia, and women’s rights are just a few of the issues covered by More in Utopia.
  5. Soon after its publication in most European languages, Utopiabecame known as the originator of a new literary genre known as theutopianromance.

Saint Thomas More

The Life and Times of Saint Thomas More Thomas More’s death was brought on by his conviction that no human leader had authority over the Church of Christ. King Henry VIII’s divorce and remarriage, as well as the formation of the Church of England, were all rejected by More, who was beheaded on Tower Hill, London, on July 6, 1535, for his obstinacy. “A man for all seasons,” More was a literary scholar, distinguished lawyer, gentleman, father of four children, and chancellor of the United Kingdom.

  1. The King’s divorce from Catherine of Aragon in order to marry Anne Boleyn was not supported by him since he was a very spiritual man.
  2. More was imprisoned in the Tower of London for trial for treason, for which he was charged with failing to swear to the Act of Succession and the Oath of Supremacy.
  3. Reflection Thomas More was canonized as a saint of God in 1935, more than four hundred years after his death.
  4. Francis of Assisi.
  5. Even as the highest-ranking official in the realm of diplomacy and advice, he did not sacrifice his own moral principles in order to appease the king, recognizing that true obedience to power does not imply mindless acceptance of whatever authority desires.
  6. However, when Thomas More resigned as chancellor because he was unable to obtain approval for the two items that were most important to Henry, the king was forced to fire him.

Saint Thomas More is the patron saint of the following: Attorneys Employees of the Civil Service Clerks in the courts Lawyers Politicians Employees of the Government

Click here for more on Saint Thomas More!

Thomas More is well known for his 1516 work ‘Utopia,’ as well as for his premature death in 1535, which occurred as a result of his refusal to recognize King Henry VIII as the legitimate head of the Church of England.

Who Was Thomas More?

Thomas More’sUtopia, published in 1516, was the predecessor of the utopian literary genre and was considered a classic. As an advisor to King Henry VIII of England in the early 1500s, More was considered a vital player in the monarch’s success, but after refusing to recognize the monarch as the head of the Church of England, More was tried for treason and executed (he died in London, England, in 1535). For his invention of the term “Utopia,” which refers to an ideal governmental society in which decisions are dictated by reason, More is well-known today.

Early Years

According to several historical documents, Thomas More was born on February 7, 1478, in London, England. However, other researchers think that he was born in the year 1477, which would make his birth year 1478. He was educated at St. Anthony’s School in London, which was considered to be one of the top institutions in the country at the time, and as a young man worked as a page in the household of John Morton, the archbishop of Canterbury and chancellor of the United Kingdom (and future cardinal).

Later, More went on to study at Oxford University, where he appears to have spent the better part of two years learning Latin and formal logic, as well as creating plays and studying Greek and Latin literature.

The Legal Profession and the Monastery

More was brought back to London to study common law by his father, who was a prominent attorney at the time (circa 1494). More was admitted to Lincoln’s Inn, one of England’s four legal societies, in February 1496 in order to prepare for admission to the bar, and he was admitted to the bar in 1501, making him a full member of the profession. More was able to maintain his literary and spiritual interests while working as a lawyer, and he devoted a lot of time to reading from both Holy Scripture and classic literature.

It marked the beginning of a lifelong friendship and professional relationship between the two, and during Erasmus’ second visit, the pair collaborated on Latin translations of Lucian’s works.

More, on the other hand, was torn between a civil service career and a monastic vocation, and he ultimately decided to pursue his monastic training.

Even though the practices of prayer, fasting, and partaking in penance would remain with him for the rest of his life (as would the custom of wearing a hair shirt), he was compelled to enter Parliament in 1504 by his sense of duty to serve his country, which overcame his desire to become a monk.

Between 1513 and 1518, it is believed that More wrote theHistory of King Richard III (both in Latin and in English) for the first time.

This unfinished work is considered to be the first masterpiece of English historiography (the study of history or the study of a specific historical subject) and, despite the fact that it was never completed, it had an impact on subsequent historians, including William Shakespeare.

‘Utopia’

More wrote Utopia in 1516, a work of fiction that principally depicted a pagan and communist island where social and political norms are totally regulated by reason, rather than by tradition. It is believed that the description of the island of Utopia was provided by a mysterious traveler to support More’s position that communism is the only cure for the egoism that can be found in both private and public life—a direct jab at Christian Europe, which More perceived as being divided by self-interest and greed.

You might be interested:  What Is The Population Of Saint Augustine Florida

Utopia also served as a precursor to the development of a new literary genre: the utopian romance.

In the Service of King Henry VIII

It was in 1520 that the reformer Martin Luther released three volumes outlining his theology of salvation, which, according to Luther, could only be gained via grace alone. The works in the series rejected certain Catholic rituals while attacking others. With the aid of More, King Henry VIII answered to Luther in hisDefence of the Seven Sacraments, which was published in 1521. More had already risen to the position of treasurer of the English exchequer, but he also functioned as “Henry’s intellectual courtier,” secretary, and confidant, and in 1523, he was chosen speaker of the House of Commons.

At Odds With HenrySubsequent Beheading

A turning point in More’s life occurred in the summer of 1527, when the English monarchy attempted to utilize the Bible in an unsuccessful attempt to establish to More that Henry’s marriage to Catherine of Aragon, who had failed to produce a male heir, had been null and invalid. More attempted to share the king’s point of view, but his efforts were in vain, and More was unable to agree to Henry’s proposal for divorce. More withdrew from the House of Commons in 1532, claiming bad health as the reason.

  • More did not attend the subsequent coronation of Anne Boleyn in June 1533, and the king did not take this well, and he vowed vengeance on More as soon as possible.
  • More was imprisoned for a year.
  • Essentially, More was refusing to recognize the king as the legitimate head of the Church of England, believing that doing so would diminish the authority of the pope in the church.
  • On the 6th of July, 1535, Thomas More was beheaded.

“The king’s excellent servant, but God’s first,” he said as he exited the building. More was beatified in 1886 and canonized as a saint by the Catholic Church in 1935, respectively. Additionally, the Church of England has designated him as a “Martyr of the Reformation.”

St. Thomas More – Saints & Angels

On February 7, 1478, Thomas More was born in London, England. Sir John More was a lawyer and judge who rose to prominence during the reign of Edward IV. He was the father of Sir John More. His connections and riches would aid his son, Thomas, in his ascent up the social ranks as a young man. Agnes Graunger, John More’s first wife, was the mother of Thomas Graunger. John would have four wives throughout the course of his life, but each of them would die, leaving John a widower. Two brothers and three sisters preceded Thomas in death, with the death of three siblings occurring within a year of their birth.

  • From an early age, it is probable that Thomas’ mother and siblings had a good impact on his development and outlook.
  • Anthony’s School, which was considered to be one of the greatest institutions in London at the time of his attendance.
  • Archiepiscop Morton was a Renaissance guy who motivated Thomas to further his own knowledge and training.
  • In 1494, he left Oxford to train as a lawyer in London, where he remained until 1502, when he was finally granted permission to begin practicing law.
  • More resided close to a Carthusian monastery for two years between 1503 and 1504, during which time he felt compelled to adopt their modest piety as a way of life, which he did.
  • By 1504, More had made the decision to remain in the secular world and had run for election to the House of Commons.
  • In 1505, Thomas More tied the knot with his first wife, Jane Colt.

According to reports, their marriage was joyful, and Thomas frequently educated her in music and literature.

Alice did not have a very lovely appearance, and her temperament was less gentle than that of Jane.

Some speculate that Thomas chose her as his stepmother for his four children since she was a well-to-do woman with a lot of money and resources.

They were not planning on having children together.

The father of three children, Thomas was seen as kind and caring, and he frequently sent letters to his children when abroad on business.

His daughters were well-known in the community for their academic achievements.

Over the course of his years of devotion to the people of London, he developed a reputation as an honest and efficient public servant.

More polished his abilities as a theologian and as a writer as well.

The work is commonly recognized as satire, social commentary, and suggestion all rolled into one package.

It is still well-regarded by scholars who read it now.

In 1521, he was knighted and appointed Under-Treasurer of the Exchequer, a position he held until his death.

In 1529, More was appointed Lord Chancellor.

The king’s most competent servant, he was also one of his most devoted, and he was known for his ferocious loyalty.

This would be a difficult, but doable assignment as long as he remained in Henry’s good graces.

This occurred in 1530, while Henry attempted to obtain an annulment from Catherine.

As part of his efforts to isolate More, Henry excommunicated a large number of clergy who had backed the Pope.

It became evident to everyone that Henry was poised to secede from the Church in Rome, which More knew he could not support under any circumstances.

With the danger of being forced to openly support Henry’s rupture with the Church, More submitted his resignation, claiming his declining health as the reason for his decision.

More declined to attend the coronation of Anne Boylen, who was now the Queen of England, in 1533, citing personal reasons.

When Henry received the letter instead of being present in person, he was quite irritated.

More was then the target of fabricated allegations by Henry, but More’s own integrity shielded him from prosecution.

He was subsequently accused of conspiring against the king after it was discovered that he had met with a nun who had prophesied about Henry VIII and his wife, Anne of Cleves.

More was able to provide it.

Henry’s marriage to Anne was approved by More, but he refused to recognize Henry as head of the church or to recognize Henry’s annulment from Catherine. As a result, he was apprehended and imprisoned. He was imprisoned in the Tower of London for the rest of his life.

To all our readers,

Please don’t move your cursor past this. We stop your reading to respectfully request that you support the independence of Catholic Online School. 98 percent of our readers do not contribute; instead, they turn their backs on us. If you are an extraordinary reader who has already made a donation, we would like to express our heartfelt gratitude to you. If everyone contributed only $10.00, or whatever they could afford, Catholic Online School could continue to thrive for years to come. The majority of donors do so because Catholic Online School is beneficial.

  1. Demonstrate to the rest of the world that you value access to Catholic education.
  2. Help Now He went on trial on July 1 and was found guilty by a jury that comprised Anne Boylen’s own father, brother, and uncle, hardly a fair and unbiased panel of judges.
  3. More, on the other hand, had one thing going for him.
  4. In the end, he had no defense against treachery, and numerous doubtful witnesses were able to concoct a tale that he had said words that had the same effect as treason in the presence of the court.
  5. To punish him for treason, the court ordered him to be hung, drawn, and quartered.
  6. Henry was happy with the decision, but he was probably disappointed that one of his favorite counselors refused to authorize his annulment and separation from Rome, even if it meant death for himself.
  7. A final act of kindness, Henry reduced More’s sentence to simple decapitation as a final gesture of goodwill.

“I am the good servant of the monarch, but I am first and foremost the servant of God,” he declared in his farewell remark.

His intense devotion, asceticism, voluntary self discipline, and penitence became immediately apparent to those who witnessed him in action.

Peter ad Vincula at the Tower of London, where he had been beheaded.

It’s possible that the skull is buried in the crypt of a church in Canterbury.

More was beatified by Pope Leo XIII in 1886, and he was canonized by Pope Pius XI on May 19, 1935, at the request of the Holy See.

His feast day is celebrated on June 22nd. He is the patron saint of adopted children, attorneys, civil workers, politicians, and couples who are having difficulties in their relationship.

Who is St. Thomas More?

Thomas More was born in London in 1478 and went on to study law at the University of London. He was known for his remarkable knowledge, impartiality, and wisdom, and he progressed through the ranks of Parliament, gaining the favor of King Henry VIII, until he was appointed Lord Chancellor of the Exchequer in 1529. Nevertheless, he resigned from his position as chancellor three years later, after becoming unsupportive of Henry VIII’s decision to divorce his wife, Catherine of Aragon, and marry Anne Boleyn.

More information about St.

  • The following resources are available: St. Thomas More at Luminarium: Anthology of English Literature
  • St. Thomas More at Catholic Encyclopedia
  • The Center for Thomas More Studies
  • And St. Thomas More at Wikipedia.

Why is St. Thomas More our patron?

Part of Sacred Heart University’s mission is to aid in the development of people who are “knowledgeable of themselves, rooted in faith, educated in mind and heart, responsive to social and civic obligations, and capable of responding to an ever-changing world.” “Knowledgeable of oneself, rooted in faith, educated in mind and heart, compassionate in heart, responsive to social and civic obligations,” according to the university’s mission statement.

  • Students enrolled in the Honors Program are encouraged to come up with novel and imaginative methods to incorporate these components of the Mission into their daily activities.
  • Thomas More is a model of what it means to carry out one’s mission as a Catholic.
  • Over the years, his Catholic religion served as a source of inspiration for all of his life’s endeavors.
  • More was a prominent and intelligent governmental official who was faithful to the monarch.
  • His work and deeds were always influenced by firm moral ideas that he held dear.
  • This was the clearest example of his moral influence.
  • However, More’s eventual decision to follow his conscience was in direct opposition to the expectations of both society and his family; however, he was ready to forego his reputation, his profession, and even his filial bond in order to do what was right.
  • Instead, he maintained his characteristically upbeat demeanor and put the needs of others ahead of his own right up to the end of his life.
  • Thomas More’s example, on the other hand, calls us to go beyond ourselves, to seek the truth wherever it may lead, and to serve our world with grace and magnanimity.

Because the soul has such deep roots in personal and social existence, and because its ideals are so diametrically opposed to contemporary concerns, caring for the soul may easily turn out to be a radical act, a challenge to accepted norms, in the long term. – Thomas More, a.k.a.

Our Patron

St. Thomas More, the patron saint of our parish, is considered to be one of the most remarkable saints in the history of the Church. He was a lawyer, author, Lord Chancellor of England, social philosopher, and one of the most prominent English Humanists of his day, among other accomplishments. His advice to King Henry VIII was so essential that the monarch knighted him in 1521 as a mark of appreciation. King Henry VIII was declared to be the ultimate head of the Church of England by Parliament in 1534, when it approved “The Supremacy Act.” Henry had Parliament proclaim that all public officials were required to take and sign an oath, which recognized him as the Supreme Head of the English Church while also promising allegiance to him in his new capacity as monarch.

  1. To escape the public spotlight and religious controversy, Thomas was obliged to step down from his post as Lord Chancellor and retreat to his family’s country residence in the countryside.
  2. Thomas was adamant in his refusal to swear the oath of allegiance to King Henry, stating that he would not make any compromise with his conscience.
  3. He was convicted of high treason and put to death as a result of his conviction.
  4. Peter after being decapitated.
  5. Saint Thomas More was canonized in 1935 by Pope Pius XI, and in the year 2000, Pope John Paul II declared him the Patron Saint of Statesmen and Politicians, saying that the world’s politicians now have a patron to look to for inspiration.
  6. There is an urgent need for clear political decisions in favor of the family, young people, the elderly, and those who are disadvantaged in this time of social and religious controversy.
  7. As the namesake of their parish, the Parish Family of Saint Thomas More is proud to be associated with a man of such moral integrity and religious conviction.
You might be interested:  Who Is St Patrick The Patron Saint Of

Saint Thomas More

What good does it do to know that there is a God, whom you not only believe in by faith, but also know by reason? What good does it do to know that there is a God, whom you not only believe in by faith, but also know by reason? Saint Thomas More is credited with inventing the term “saint.” After all, what men refer to as fame is nothing more than a fleeting whim. A guy believes that many people are admiring him and speaking well of him, while they spend just a little portion of their day thinking about him, preoccupied with their own concerns.

  1. His grace has sustained me till this point, and I have learned to be satisfied with losing property, land, and even my life rather than swearing against my conscience.
  2. His Majesty has done me such enormous good in terms of spiritual profit as a result of this that I believe that, among all the many wonderful blessings he has lavished upon me, my imprisonment is the most significant of them all.
  3. His bounteous charity will liberate me from the miseries of purgatory and will raise my reward in heaven as a result of the merits of his agonizing passion united to mine and far surpassing in worth for me everything that I may endure myself.
  4. And then I have faith that he would lay his holy hand on me and keep me from drowning in the raging oceans of the world.
  5. As a result, I want to devote my entire life to him, with the best of intentions.
  6. To be honest, Meg, I am hopeful that his gentle pity will keep my wounded soul secure and cause me to praise his kindness.
  7. Nothing else than God’s will can bring about a change.
  8. – from a letter sent by Saint Thomas More to his daughter Margaret when he was in jail.
  9. Please grant me a healthy physique as well as the good humor I’ll need to keep it that way.
  10. Give me a spirit that is free of boredom, grumblings, sighs, and laments, as well as undue tension, all because of that obstructive entity known as “I.” I’ll take it.
  11. Allow me the grace to be able to take a joke and use it to discover a little of joy in my life, and to be able to share that joy with other people.

Saint Thomas More is credited with inventing the term “saint.” O God, who through suffering has elevated genuine faith to its ultimate expression, kindly grant that, strengthened by the intercession of Saints John Fisher and Thomas More, we may confirm the faith we confess with our lips with the witness of our lives.

Through the intercession of our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for all time and eternity. A liturgical collect is a collection of hymns and other religious songs.

Thomas More

The feast day is on June 22nd. 1935 was the year when it was canonized. In 1886, he was canonized. “Give us the courage to proclaim our faith through the witness of our lives,” we ask at the Opening Prayer on June 22. (Sacramentary). Throughout his life, Thomas More exemplified the virtues of faith and bravery, and his example teaches us what it means to bear testimony to our religion. Thomas was born in the English capital of London around 1478. He went on to become a lawyer and a member of the English parliament, among other things.

  1. In 1529, Henry VIII elevated Thomas to the position of Lord Chancellor of the United Kingdom.
  2. He desired to divorce his wife and marry another lady, according to King Henry VIII.
  3. Henry had expected Thomas to side with him, but Thomas refused, and he resigned from his position in 1532 as a result.
  4. He directed that a paper be written by parliament appointing him as the head of the Church of England.
  5. Henry insisted on the oath being signed by all of England’s bishops as well as his whole administration.
  6. He was well aware that the pope was the spiritual heir to St.
  7. King Henry III was enraged.

He was judged guilty of treason against the monarch and put to death as a result of his conviction.

St.

He exemplified the moral character of fortitude in his life.

We can learn from the example set by Saint Thomas More.

As a patron saint of attorneys and politicians, he is revered in our society.

About St. Thomas More – Patron Saint Article

Date of the Feast: June 22nd. Inscribed on the canon: 1935. In 1886, a saint was proclaimed. “Give us the courage to proclaim our faith through the witness of our lives,” we ask in the Opening Prayer on June 22. (Sacramentary). Throughout his life, Thomas More exemplified the virtues of faith and bravery, and his example teaches us what it means to bear testimony to our beliefs. During the year 1478, Thomas was born in the English capital of London. Following his graduation from university, he went on to become an attorney and a member of the English parliament.

  1. A father of four children, Thomas was married twice.
  2. This did not meet with the approval of the pope.
  3. King Henry VIII made the decision to break the Church of England apart from the Catholic Church in Rome, which became known as the Reformation.
  4. The Oath of Supremacy was the name given to this document.
  5. Thom was adamant in his opposition.
  6. Peter, he was well aware that there could only be one pope in the entire world.
  7. Thomas was apprehended and imprisoned in the Tower of London for a period of 15 months.

The canonization of Saint John Fisher, along with his buddy Saint John Fisher, occurred in 1935.

St.

With his fortitude, he demonstrated the moral virtue of perseverance.

St.

Through our everyday words and deeds, we may bear witness to our belief in Jesus and his Church.

Classifying and Connecting to Be My Disciples ® Fourth Grade, Chapter 19Fifth Grade, Chapter 16 Interacting with the people of Blest Are We®. a parish and an educational establishment Unit 4 of The Story of Our Church is titled “The Story of Our Church” and is available online.

About Saint Thomas More

Thomas More was born in the English capital of London around 1478. He was up surrounded by the classics and religion, and he went on to study law at Oxford University. Following graduating, Thomas pursued a legal profession until being elected to the House of Commons a few years later. In 1505, he tied the knot with Jane Colt, with whom he had four children. She died when he was still a kid, and he subsequently married a widow in order to provide a mother for his children. Bishops and intellectuals were among his circle of acquaintances, and in 1516, he published “Utopia,” which is his best-known book.

  1. During the latter half of his life, St.
  2. He was imprisoned in the Tower of London alongside his buddy St.
  3. His trial for treason took place after 15 months in jail.
  4. In his trial, Thomas stated that he could not go against his conscience and that the judges agreed with him.
  5. St.
  6. His feast day is celebrated on June 22nd.

Shop St. Thomas More Medals and Rosaries

London, England was the site of Thomas More’s birth in 1478. The classics and religion were important influences on him as a child, and he went on to study law at Oxford. In the years after his graduation, Thomas pursued a legal profession before being elected to the House of Commons a short time later. They had four children after his marriage to Jane Colt in 1505. He married a widow to provide a mother for his children after she died when he was still a youngster. “Utopia,” his most famous work, was written in 1516 and was dedicated to the memory of bishops and academics.

  • During the latter half of his life, St.
  • He was imprisoned in the Tower of London alongside his buddy St.
  • His trial for treason took place after 15 months in prison.
  • He informed the court that he could not go against his moral convictions during the trial in his defense.

A martyr was made out of him by having him beheaded. St. Thomas More is the patron saint of religious liberty, as well as of statesmen and politicians, due to his commitment to the rights of conscience. It is on June 22nd that he will be celebrated.

Patronage of St. Thomas More

Adopted children, civil officials, court clerks, attorneys, politicians, stepparents, and widowers are all patronized by St. Thomas More, who is also the patron saint of lawyers. He has received these patronages as a result of his commitment to his family and to the government’s service.

You might be interested:  When Is Saint Nicks Day

St. Thomas More in Art

When St. Thomas More appears in artwork, he is dressed in clothes that is representative of the Renaissance, the historical period in which he lived. The “livery collar” around his neck, which denotes his standing in King Henry VIII’s courts, is worn in addition to his hat and robes, and he is dressed in this manner. In addition, he carries paper (often in the form of a scroll) in his hands, which represents his education and works. Prayers for St. Thomas More

Prayer to Saint Thomas More for Lawyers

The most human of saints, Thomas More, advisor of the law and statesman of honesty, cheerful martyr, and most human of martyrs: For the glory of God and the pursuit of His justice, pray that I may be trustworthy with confidences, acute in study, exact in analysis, correct in conclusion, capable in argument, devoted to clients, honest with everyone, gracious to enemies, and always mindful of my conscience.

Come sit with me at my desk and listen to the stories of my clients with me. Take part in my library reading sessions with me and remain by my side at all times so that today I do not, to earn a point, forfeit my soul.

A Prayer Written by St. Thomas More while he was imprisoned in the Tower of London

Please, Good Lord, grant me the grace I need. To bring the entire globe to a grinding halt. To fix one’s gaze firmly on You rather than on the words that come out of other people’s lips. To be comfortable with one’s alone existence. It is not necessary to yearn for worldly pleasures. I’m working on removing myself completely from the world and clearing my thoughts of all its concerns one step at a time. I’m not looking forward to hearing about earthly matters, but I’m worried that hearing about worldly fantasies would make me feel uneasy.

  • It is necessary to lean on God’s comfort.
  • It is necessary for me to recognize my own vileness and wretchedness.
  • In order to purify myself of my sins, I must patiently endure misfortune in order to achieve that purification.
  • To be cheerful in the face of adversity.
  • It is important to keep the final item in mind.
  • To make death no longer be a foreign concept to me.
  • To pray for forgiveness prior to the arrival of the judge.
  • In order to reclaim the time that I have lost.
  • It is important to avoid foolish mirth and joy.
  • Of worldly possessions, friends, liberty, life, and everything else, in order to make up for the loss in the winning of Christ.

These minds are more desirable in every man than all of the treasures of all of the princes and kings, Christian and heathen, if they were all gathered and laid out in one heap. Amen.

Litany of St. Thomas More,

Martyr and Saint of Statesmen, Politicians, and Lawyers, among other things. The Lord, have mercyR. Lord have mercyV. Christ, have mercyR. Christ have mercyV. Lord, have mercyR. Lord have mercyV. Christ hear usR. Christ, graciously hear usV. Christ hear usV. Lord, have mercyR. Lord have mercyV. Christ hear usR. Christ, graciously hear us V. Reverend St. Thomas More, Saint and Martyr,R.I.P. Please pray for us (Repeat after each invocation) The Saints Thomas More and John Paul II are patrons of statesmen, politicians, and lawyers.

  1. St.
  2. St.
  3. St.
  4. We beseech you O Lord to spare usV.Lamb of God, you take away the sin of the worldR.Spare us O LordV.Lamb of God, you take away the sin of the worldRSpare us O Lord Please take the time to listen to us.
  5. Please have mercy on us.
  6. As St.
  7. We implore you to intercede for our leaders, including our president, legislators, judges, and lawyers, that they may be bold and successful in their protection and promotion of human life, which is the cornerstone of all other human rights.
  8. In the name of God, Amen.

Sir Thomas More

Thomas More is widely regarded as a man of extraordinary integrity, and he has since been recognized as a martyr and canonized as a saint by Catholic authorities. Sir Thomas More was born in the British capital of London. His father, John More, was a lawyer and a judge, and his mother, Agnes Graunger, had a significant effect on the young Thomas More. He was a very religious man of prayer, a philosopher, and a skilled lawyer who rose to the position of politician as a result of his efforts. With Utopia, Sir Thomas More created a book that was first published in 1516, and in which he described the political structure of an imagined island kingdom.

Sir Thomas More was a kind father who frequently sent letters to his children when he was abroad on business.

His daughters were well-known in the community for their academic achievements.

Sir Thomas More was tried and convicted of treason because he refused to take the Oath of Supremacy.

Sir Thomas More was imprisoned in the Tower of London when he refused to recite the Oath of Succession in the presence of the King. When he first landed in the tower, he penned a letter to his eldest daughter, Margaret Roper, which has since become renowned. He was decapitated the next day.

Sir Thomas More, A Defender of Natural Law and Religious Liberty

Every year, on the 22nd of June, the Thomas More Society commemorates the life of our namesake, Sir Thomas More, in honor of his feast day. Justice, statesmen, and politicians are all patronized by Sir Thomas More, the patron saint of lawyers. A man of great spiritual beliefs, Sir Thomas More had spent time in prayer with the Carthusian monks who resided nearby in the local monastery, and he had a strong sense of justice. It was at this period of prayer and reflection that Sir Thomas More prepared himself for the obstacles that he would confront later in his professional life.

  1. It was during this time period that King Henry VIII expressed a wish to separate from the Catholic church and establish his own church.
  2. Sir Thomas More was asked to provide his approval to King Henry VIII’s wish to designate himself as head of the Church of England, which he did.
  3. His ultimate objective was to be able to officially divorce his legitimate wife, Catherine, and marry another woman, Anne Boleyn, in order to do this.
  4. What Sir Thomas More did not anticipate was the duplicity and betrayal of those who desired power at his expense, which resulted in his death.
  5. Sir Thomas More was not willing to forsake his moral principles.
  6. Especially in this day and age, Saint Thomas More serves as an inspiring role model for pro-life advocates and those entrusted to protect them, such as the Thomas More Societyattorneys, via his calm and steadfast dedication to beliefs.

A Message from our Founder and President

The Thomas More Society was founded by Thomas Brejcha, who served as its president and chief counsel. As I work with You, Saint Thomas More, I pray that I may be trustworthy with confidences, keen in study, accurate in analysis, correct in conclusion, able in argumentation, loyal to clients, honest with all, courteous to adversaries, and always alert to my own conscience, all for the glory of God and the pursuit of His justice. Come sit with me at my desk and listen to the stories of my clients with me.

Make a prayer for me, and with me, that my family would find in me what Your family found in You: friendship and courage, cheerfulness and charitable giving, diligence in responsibilities, advice in adversity, patience in suffering—their good servant, but first and foremost God’s servant.

“The Arrest and Execution of Sir Thomas More in 1535,” written by Antoine Caron, is a historical novel.

“What good does it do to know that there is a God, whom you not only believe in by faith, but also know by reason? What good does it do to know Him if you have a low opinion of Him?” says the philosopher.

Give Me the Grace, Good Lord

Please, Good Lord, grant me the ability to bring the entire planet to a grinding halt. To fix one’s gaze firmly on You rather than on the words that come out of other people’s lips. – To be comfortable with one’s alone existence. It is not necessary to yearn for worldly pleasures. I’m working on removing myself completely from the world and clearing my thoughts of all its concerns one step at a time. – I don’t want to hear about earthly matters, yet I’m worried that hearing about worldly fantasies would make me feel uncomfortable.

It is necessary to lean on God’s comfort.

– It is necessary for me to recognize my own vileness and wretchedness.

In order to purify myself of my sins, I must patiently endure misfortune in order to achieve that purification.

To be cheerful in the face of adversity.

– To keep the last item in mind as a final farewell.

To make death no longer be a foreign concept to me.

To ask for forgiveness before to the arrival of the judge.

To express gratitude to God for His blessings on an ongoing basis.

To refrain from engaging in pointless discourse.

In order to avoid unwanted recreations.

– Because the brethren of Joseph could never have done him as much good with their love and favor as they did him with their hate and hatred, it is appropriate to consider my greatest foes to be my closest friends.

Amen.

Fighting for Life: the Story of NOW v. Scheidler, the Full Documentary

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *