Who Is Saint Faustina

St. Maria Faustina Kowalska

When Sister Faustina arrived to the Congregation of Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy in Poland in the 1930s, she was a young, untrained nun. She was born into a working-class family that suffered financially during World War I. Because she had just three years of elementary school, she was assigned to the most menial jobs in the convent, which were generally in the kitchen or garden. Her astounding insights or communications from our Lord Jesus, on the other hand, were received by no one else. Sr.

Known now as theDiary of Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska, the notebooks carry God’s loving message of Divine Mercy, which is expressed via the words written therein.

Faustina’s diary ignited a huge movement that has resulted in an intense and important focus on the mercy of Christ in recent years.

Faustina was canonized by Pope John Paul II in 2000, establishing her as the “first saint of the new millennium.” Sr.

Saint Faustina continues to serve as a continual reminder of the lesson of trusting in Jesus’ unending compassion and living life graciously toward others, which we continue to rely on today.

Our 3 o’clock prayers at the National Shrine of The Divine Mercy in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, contain the following as part of the overall prayer: Saint Faustina, you promised us that your mission would continue after your death and that you would never forget us.

Our Lord also bestowed a wonderful prerogative upon you, instructing you to “distribute favors as you see fit, to whoever you see fit, and when you see fit.” Having put our trust in you, we beg for your intercession for the graces we require, particularly for the purposes previously described.

Amen The Marian Fathers of Stockbridge, Massachusetts, initiated a petition drive on Sept.

Faustina a Doctor of the Church, which was successful.

St. Maria Faustina Kowalska – Biography

This is an excerpt from the biography Apostle of Divine Mercy, which was released by the Vatican. Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska, an apostle of Divine Mercy, is currently considered to be among the most famous and well-known saints in the history of the Catholic Church. In Your saints, O my Jesus, everyone exemplifies one of Your qualities; I hope to exemplify Your compassionate and kind heart; I want to magnify it. Allow Your kindness, O Jesus, to be imprinted on my heart and spirit like a seal, and this will serve as my identification card in this life and the next.

  • Sister Faustina was born on August 25, 1905, in the Polish town of Glogowiec, to an impoverished and pious family of peasants.
  • She was given the name Helena when she was christened at the parish church of Swinice Warckie.
  • She had already experienced the first stirrings of a religious vocation when she was seven years old.
  • She was only in school for three semesters, then she dropped out.

Helen left home when she was 16 years old and went to work as a cleaner in Aleksandrów, Lodi, and Ostrówek in order to provide for herself and her parents while still earning a living.

Helen joins Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy

Helen’s desire to pursue a monastic vocation was never completely extinguished. She joined the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy on August 1, 1925, after being summoned by a vision of the Suffering Christ. She was given the name Sr. Maria Faustina of the Most Blessed Sacrament after being received into the convent by the Suffering Christ. She was a member of the Congregation for thirteen years, residing in a number of different religious homes. While in Poland, she also spent time in Plock and Vilnius, where she worked as a chef, gardener, and porter, among other things.

  • She worked tirelessly to complete her responsibilities and adhered to the rules of monastic life to the letter.
  • Despite the fact that her existence appeared to be trivial, boring, and uninteresting, she was actually experiencing an incredible unity with God.
  • The process of meditating and getting to know the mystery of God’s compassion assisted in developing in Sr.
  • Dedicated to the Church, which she loved as a Mother, and the Mystical Body of Christ, Sister Faustina lived her life as a devoted daughter of the Church.
  • She made the ultimate sacrifice of her own life in order to achieve this exact purpose, at the explicit request of and in the manner of the Lord Jesus.

The Secretary of God’s Mercy

Divine Mercy in My Soul is a journal written by Sr. Maria Faustina, who was chosen by the Lord Jesus to be the Apostle and “Secretary” of His Mercy, so that she may spread the word about His wonderful message to the entire world. He addressed her in the Old Covenant, saying: “I sent prophets to My people, brandishing thunderbolts in their hands. Today, I am sending you out into the globe to bring My mercy to the people of the entire world. I do not wish to punish a beleaguered humanity; rather, I wish to heal it by pressing it against My Merciful Heart.” (1588, according to the diary) It is through the work of Sr.

  • It appeals to not just the simple and ignorant, but also to experts who see it as a valuable source of extra theological information.
  • Other languages that have been translated include Spanish, French and Portuguese; Arabic; Russian; Hungarian; Czech; Slovak; Polish; Castilian; Brazilian; Vietnamese; Korean; Chinese; Swedish; Ukrainian; Dutch; and Japanese.
  • She had been consumed by tuberculosis and innumerable sufferings, all of which she accepted willingly as a voluntary sacrifice for the sins of the world.
  • Krakow conducted an investigation into her life and heroic virtues from 1965 to 1967, and Rome began the Beatification process in 1968, after which the investigation was completed in Krakow.

St. Faustina was elevated to the splendor of the altars on April 18, 1993, by our Holy Father, Pope John Paul II. On April 30, 2000, she was declared a saint. The relics of St. Maria Faustina are interred at the Sanctuary of the Divine Mercy in Krakow-Lagiewniki (Krakow, Poland).

St. Faustina Kowalska – Saints & Angels

Helena Kowalska, known as Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska of the Blessed Sacrament, was born on August 25, 1905, in Glogowiec, Leczyca County, north-west of Lódz, Poland, as the daughter of a farmer. She was the third of ten children born to an impoverished and devout religious family in rural Pennsylvania. When Faustina was seven years old, she witnessed the Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament and realized she had a called to the monastic life. Faustina was determined to enter a convent as soon as she finished her secondary education.

  1. Instead, when she was 16 years old, Faustina went to work as a cleaner to assist her parents and support her own family.
  2. A tortured Jesus appeared to Faustina during a dance with her sister, Natalia, and she immediately sought refuge in a cathedral.
  3. Faustina hurriedly packed her belongings and left the following morning.
  4. During her time in Warsaw, Faustina attempted to enter a number of different convents but was turned away each time.
  5. Finally, the mother superior of the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy made the decision to accept Faustina on the condition that she pay for her own religious habit, which she was unable to do.

To all our readers,

Helena Kowalska was born on August 25, 1905, in Glogowiec, Leczyca County, north-west of Lódz, Poland, and became known as Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska of the Blessed Sacrament. She was the third of ten children born to an impoverished and devout religious family in rural Kentucky. While attending the Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament when she was seven years old, Faustina had her first encounter with a call to the monastic life. She intended to enter a convent as soon as she completed her secondary education.

  1. Instead, when she was 16 years old, Faustina went to work as a cleaner to assist her parents and cover her own living expenses.
  2. A tortured Jesus appeared to Faustina during a dance with her sister, Natalia, and she later visited a cathedral.
  3. Immediately, Faustina packed her belongings and left the next morning.
  4. During her time in Warsaw, Faustina attempted to enter a number of different convents but was turned away on each occasion.
  5. Finally, the mother superior of the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy made the decision to accept Faustina on the condition that she pay for her own religious habit, which she was unable to afford.

Working as a housekeeper, Faustina was able to save money and make contributions to the Convent as a result of her employment.

7 things you need to know about St. Faustina and her vision of Hell

Alejandro Bermudez contributed to this article. 10 a.m. on the 5th of October, 2021 at the Denver Newsroom Despite the fact that Catholics all over the globe are familiar with St. Faustina Kowalska and her relationship to Divine Mercy, many may be unaware of the method in which Jesus spoke to her about her calling, Hell, and her mission to communicate God’s mercy. Here are seven interesting facts about this well-known saint to keep in mind: 1. Her given name was Helena, and she was born in that name.

  1. Maria Faustina Kowalska of the Blessed Sacrament when she was born on August 25, 1905, in Poland.
  2. She was just 26 years old at the time of her death.
  3. The date of her feast day is October 5.
  4. She had no intention of becoming a nun.
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Helena had no intention of entering religious life, but when she was 19, while attending a dance with her sister Natalia in Lodz, she had a vision of a suffering Jesus who asked her, “How long shall I put up with you and how long will you continue to put Me off?” Following her prayer service in the Cathedral, she traveled to Warsaw, where she became a member of the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy.

  • On April 30, 1926, when she was 20 years old, she was clad in the habit and given the religious name of Sister.
  • Jesus gave Mary a description of how his Divine Mercy figure should appear.
  • 22, 1931, while she was in her cell in Plock, Poland, recovering from TB to a partial extent, Faustina recounted that Jesus appeared to her wearing a white robe with red and pale rays issuing from his heart.
  • She saw a vision of Hell, which she described.
  • “A dreadful suffering,” she wrote in her notebook about the experience.
  • 5.
  • The National Catholic Register reports that Faustina “saw Dante-like parts of hell earmarked for unique agonies earned in this sinful world,” according to Paul Kengor, a professor of political science at Grove City College and a National Catholic Register writer.
  • “There are distinct tortures that are reserved for specific souls.
  • According to the method in which a soul sins, it experiences horrible and incomprehensible afflictions.
  • The vast majority of the doomed did not believe in Hell.
  • Her vision was intended to aid in the salvation of souls.

By means of these visions and their messengers, the divine is providing us with yet another opportunity. This is a warning for us to get our lives in order, to cease sinning, and to seek conversion and redemption as soon as possible.

7 things you need to know about St. Faustina and her vision of Hell

Alejandro Bermudez contributed to this report. 5th of October, 00:00 am at the Denver Newsroom in 2021 However, while many Catholics throughout the globe are familiar with St. Faustina Kowalska and her link to Divine Compassion, many may be unaware of the method in which Jesus spoke to her about God’s mercy as well as her calling and mission to proclaim God’s mercy. Seven noteworthy facts concerning this well-known saint are as follows: The first and last names of Helena were given to her. Helena Kowalska was born on August 25, 1905, in Poland, and became known as St.

  • Following her selection by Jesus and Mary to be the improbable apostle of the Divine Mercy, she died on October 5, 1938, at the age of thirty-nine years and nine months.
  • Oct.
  • 2.
  • While attending a dance with her sister Natalia in Lodz, Helena had a vision of a suffering Jesus who questioned her, “How long should I put up with you and how long will you keep putting Me off?” Helena had no intention of embracing monastic life when she was 19 years old.
  • She was dressed in the habit and given her religious name on April 30, 1926, when she was 20 years old.
  • Jesus gave Mary a description of how his Divine Mercy picture should be shown.
  • 22, 1931, while she was in her cell in Plock, Poland, recovering from TB to a partial extent, Faustina recounted that Jesus appeared to her in a white robe with red and pale rays issuing from his heart.

She had a vision of Hell “Great anguish” and “fire that would enter the soul without destroying it,” she wrote in her diary about her journey to what she dubbed the “chasms of hell” during an eight-day retreat in October 1936.

It was pitch black in this hell, yet “the devils and the souls of the damned saw each other and all the evil, both of others and their own,” despite the gloom there.

She was taken on a tour of Hell, showing her the various levels.

According to Faustina’s journal, “there are caves and torture pits where one type of misery differs from another.” Faustina was tortured in a variety of ways.

Depending on how it sinned, each soul suffers horrendous and unfathomable torments.” 6.

7.

Kenner writes that, “as terrifying as they are, these images nevertheless convey an urgent call to mercy.” The almighty is offering us yet another opportunity through these visions and their messengers.

This is a warning for us to get our lives in order, to cease sinning, and to seek conversion and redemption before it is too late.

Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska

Submitted by Alejandro Bermudez 5th of October, 00:00 am at the Denver Newsroom While many Catholics throughout the globe are familiar with St. Faustina Kowalska and her link to Divine Mercy, many are unaware of the method in which Jesus spoke to her about her calling, Hell, and her mission to communicate God’s mercy. Here are seven crucial facts about this well-known saint to be aware of: 1. Her given name was Helena, and she grew up with that name. Helena Kowalska was the name given to St. Maria Faustina Kowalska of the Blessed Sacrament when she was born in Poland on August 25, 1905.

  • On April 30, 2000, Pope John Paul II declared her to be a saint.
  • 2.
  • While attending a dance with her sister Natalia in Lodz, Helena had a vision of a suffering Jesus who questioned her, “How long should I put up with you and how long will you keep putting Me off?” At the time, Helena had no intention of adopting monastic life.
  • She was dressed in the habit and given her religious name on April 30, 1926, when she was twenty years old.
  • Jesus gave Mary a description of how his Divine Mercy figure should appear.
  • Faustina claimed that during the night of Sunday, February 22, 1931, while she was in her cell in Plock, Poland, after largely recuperating from TB, Jesus appeared to her wearing a white gown with red and pale rays issuing from his heart.
  • She saw a vision of the hereafter.

This hell was shrouded in darkness, yet “the demons and the souls of the damned saw each other and all the evil, both of others and their own,” despite the gloom.

She was taken on a tour of numerous levels of Hell.

“There are dungeons and pits of torment where one form of misery differs from another,” Faustina wrote in her diary, referring to the several types of agony.

These are the torments of the senses that you’re experiencing.

The vast majority of the doomed had never heard of Hell.

7.

“As terrifying as they are, (these images) nevertheless ring with a positive urgency to kindness,” Kengor writes.

The almighty is providing us with yet another opportunity through these visions and their messengers. We are being admonished to get our lives in order, to stop sinning, and to seek conversion and redemption before it is too late.”

Enjoy this prayer to Saint Faustina!

By Alejandro Bermudez Denver Newsroom, October 5, 2021 / 00:00 a.m. While many Catholics throughout the globe are familiar with St. Faustina Kowalska and her link to Divine Mercy, many are unaware of the manner in which Jesus spoke to her about her calling, Hell, and her mission to communicate God’s mercy. Here are seven interesting facts about this well-known saint to be aware of: 1. Her given name was Helena. Helena Kowalska was given the name Maria Faustina Kowalska when she was born on August 25, 1905, in Poland.

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On April 30, 2000, Pope John Paul II declared her a saint.

2.

Young Helena had no intention of entering monastic life, but at the age of 19, while attending a dance with her sister Natalia in Lodz, she had a vision of a suffering Jesus who questioned her, “How long should I put up with you and how long will you keep putting Me off?” After worshiping at the Cathedral, she traveled to Warsaw, where she became a member of the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy.

On April 30, 1926, when she was 20 years old, she was clad in the habit and given her religious name.

Jesus described to Mary what his Divine Mercy picture should look like.

According to her journal, Jesus instructed her to “Paint a picture according to the pattern you see, with the signature: ‘Jesus, I trust in You’I wish that this image be worshipped, first in your chapel, and subsequently across the globe.” I guarantee that the soul that would revere this image will not perish.” 4.

During an eight-day retreat in October 1936, she was escorted by an angel to what she described in her diary as a realm of “great anguish” and “fire that will permeate the soul without destroying it – a dreadful torment.” This hell was filled with darkness, yet “the demons and the souls of the damned saw each other and all the evil, both of others and their own,” despite the gloom.

She was shown many degrees of Hell.

“There are certain tortures that are reserved for individual souls.

Depending on how it sinned, each soul suffers horrendous and unimaginable torment.” 6.

Faustina stated that what she was revealing was only a “pale shadow of the things I witnessed.” But there was one thing I noticed: the majority of the souls in hell were those who did not believe in the existence of a hell.” “I, Sister Faustina Kowalska, by the will of God, have visited the abysses of hell in order to tell souls about it and attest to its reality,” she wrote in her journal.

Her vision was intended to save souls.

ring with a positive urgency to kindness.” The almighty is giving us yet another opportunity through these visions and their messengers. We’re being told to get our lives in order, to stop sinning, and to seek conversion and redemption before it’s too late.”

Biography

Alejandro Bermudez contributed to this article. 10 a.m. on the 5th of October, 2021 at the Denver Newsroom Despite the fact that Catholics all over the globe are familiar with St. Faustina Kowalska and her relationship to Divine Mercy, many may be unaware of the method in which Jesus spoke to her about her calling, Hell, and her mission to communicate God’s mercy. Here are seven interesting facts about this well-known saint to keep in mind: 1. Her given name was Helena, and she was born in that name.

  • Maria Faustina Kowalska of the Blessed Sacrament when she was born on August 25, 1905, in Poland.
  • She was just 26 years old at the time of her death.
  • The date of her feast day is October 5.
  • She had no intention of becoming a nun.

Helena had no intention of entering religious life, but when she was 19, while attending a dance with her sister Natalia in Lodz, she had a vision of a suffering Jesus who asked her, “How long shall I put up with you and how long will you continue to put Me off?” Following her prayer service in the Cathedral, she traveled to Warsaw, where she became a member of the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy.

  • On April 30, 1926, when she was 20 years old, she was clad in the habit and given the religious name of Sister.
  • Jesus gave Mary a description of how his Divine Mercy figure should appear.
  • 22, 1931, while she was in her cell in Plock, Poland, recovering from TB to a partial extent, Faustina recounted that Jesus appeared to her wearing a white robe with red and pale rays issuing from his heart.
  • She saw a vision of Hell, which she described.
  • “A dreadful suffering,” she wrote in her notebook about the experience.
  • 5.
  • The National Catholic Register reports that Faustina “saw Dante-like parts of hell earmarked for unique agonies earned in this sinful world,” according to Paul Kengor, a professor of political science at Grove City College and a National Catholic Register writer.
  • “There are distinct tortures that are reserved for specific souls.
  • According to the method in which a soul sins, it experiences horrible and incomprehensible afflictions.
  • The vast majority of the doomed did not believe in Hell.
  • Her vision was intended to aid in the salvation of souls.

By means of these visions and their messengers, the divine is providing us with yet another opportunity. This is a warning for us to get our lives in order, to cease sinning, and to seek conversion and redemption as soon as possible.

Biographical Chronology

Alejandro Bermudez contributed to this report. 5th of October, 00:00 am at the Denver Newsroom in 2021 However, while many Catholics throughout the globe are familiar with St. Faustina Kowalska and her link to Divine Compassion, many may be unaware of the method in which Jesus spoke to her about God’s mercy as well as her calling and mission to proclaim God’s mercy. Seven noteworthy facts concerning this well-known saint are as follows: The first and last names of Helena were given to her. Helena Kowalska was born on August 25, 1905, in Poland, and became known as St.

  1. Following her selection by Jesus and Mary to be the improbable apostle of the Divine Mercy, she died on October 5, 1938, at the age of thirty-nine years and nine months.
  2. Oct.
  3. 2.
  4. While attending a dance with her sister Natalia in Lodz, Helena had a vision of a suffering Jesus who questioned her, “How long should I put up with you and how long will you keep putting Me off?” Helena had no intention of embracing monastic life when she was 19 years old.
  5. She was dressed in the habit and given her religious name on April 30, 1926, when she was 20 years old.
  6. Jesus gave Mary a description of how his Divine Mercy picture should be shown.
  7. 22, 1931, while she was in her cell in Plock, Poland, recovering from TB to a partial extent, Faustina recounted that Jesus appeared to her in a white robe with red and pale rays issuing from his heart.

She had a vision of Hell “Great anguish” and “fire that would enter the soul without destroying it,” she wrote in her diary about her journey to what she dubbed the “chasms of hell” during an eight-day retreat in October 1936.

It was pitch black in this hell, yet “the devils and the souls of the damned saw each other and all the evil, both of others and their own,” despite the gloom there.

She was taken on a tour of Hell, showing her the various levels.

According to Faustina’s journal, “there are caves and torture pits where one type of misery differs from another.” Faustina was tortured in a variety of ways.

Depending on how it sinned, each soul suffers horrendous and unfathomable torments.” 6.

7.

Kenner writes that, “as terrifying as they are, these images nevertheless convey an urgent call to mercy.” The almighty is offering us yet another opportunity through these visions and their messengers.

This is a warning for us to get our lives in order, to cease sinning, and to seek conversion and redemption before it is too late.

  • The journey made by Helen Kowalska to Warsaw in order to enter a monastery
  • Work for Aldona Lipszyc in the town of Ostrówek, in the county of Klembów
  • It was Mother Michaela Moraczewska who welcomed me into the convent on my first visit, and she was the one who gave me my first admission as a Sister of Mercy.
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Helen Kowalska is received into the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy, located on ytnia Street in Warsaw, on August 1, 1925. Helen Kowalska, a postulant from Poland, travels to Skolimów, a Congregational holiday home, in August 1925 in order to recuperate her health. 1925 Helen Kowalska is a postulant at the Congregation house in Warsaw, where she is under the leadership of Mistress Janina Bartkiewicz. The arrival of postulant Helen Kowalska in Kraków on January 23, 1926, in order to finish her postulancy and two years of the novitiate under the guidance of Mistresses Magorzata Gimbutt and Maria Józefa Brzoza.

  • M.
  • She also received her habit.
  • Sister Faustina begins her seclusion on April 20, 1928, in preparation for her temporary vows.
  • Sister Faustina travels to Warsaw, Poland, on October 31, 1928, to serve in the kitchen.
  • Petronela Basiura, who was about to begin her third probationary year in the order.
  • In June 1929, Sister Faustina relocates to Grochów, Warsaw, to a newly-formed home of the Congregation on Hetmaska Street, which had just been built.
  • Modesta Rzeczkowska.
  • 1930 (May-June)
  • The arrival of Sister Faustina in Pock and her employment at the bread business
  • During Sister Faustina’s stay in the branch home in the village of Biaa (10 kilometers from Pock),

Arrival in Pock of Sister Faustina and her employment at the pastry business; During Sister Faustina’s stay at the branch home in the village of Biaa (10 kilometers from Pock), she was accompanied by her brother.

  • At 4:00 p.m., Sister Faustina makes her final confession to Fr. Józef Andrasz
  • At 10:45 p.m., the chaplain Fr. Teodor Czaputa prays with the sisters at the bedside of the dying Sister Faustina
  • At 10:45 p.m., Sister Faustina passes away to the Lord in the presence of Sisters Amelia Socha and Eufemia Traczyska
  • At

At 4:00 p.m., Sister Faustina makes her final confession to Fr. Józef Andrasz; at 10:45 p.m., the chaplain Fr. Teodor Czaputa prays with the sisters at the bedside of the dying Sister Faustina; at 10:45 p.m., Sister Faustina passes away to the Lord in the presence of Sister Amelia Socha and Sister Eufemia Traczyska; at

  • It is celebrated the beatification of Sister Faustina by Pope John Paul II in St. Peter’s Square in Rome
  • The relics of Sister Faustina are revealed at the altar in Krakow’s Shrine of Divine Mercy beneath the miraculous Image of the Merciful Jesus
  • And the feast of Saint Faustina is celebrated in Rome.

It is celebrated the beatification of Sister Faustina by Pope John Paul II in St. Peter’s Square in Rome; the relics of Sister Faustina are revealed at the altar in Krakow’s Shrine of Divine Mercy beneath the miraculous Image of the Merciful Jesus; and the feast of Saint Faustina is celebrated in Rome on October 25th.

St. Maria Faustina Kowalska

Skip to the main content St. Maria Faustina Kowalska is a Polish saint. “Secretary of Mercy” and gifted storyteller, visionary, and humanitarian. Although St. Faustina was selected by Jesus to be a vessel through which He would spread the great message of Divine Mercy, her visionary spiritual life was obscured by her modest bodily appearance. Helena Kowalska was born in 1905 in Poland to a family of impoverished peasants, and she was the third of ten children in her family. She had a strong sense of calling to convent life since she was seven years old, but her parents discouraged her from pursuing it since they couldn’t afford the dowry, which was the money and clothes necessary for a woman entering monastic life.

  • Helena was in fact so fashionable that a former employer expressed concern that she was too expensive to recruit because of her appearance.
  • Even later in her convent life, sisters stated that they enjoyed being in her company and referred to her as their “lawyer” because of the persuasive manner she utilized hand gestures to support her points of view.
  • She was nineteen years old at the time.
  • She packed her belongings that night and proceeded to Warsaw, where she was rejected by a number of convents until being accepted by the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy, which she joined the next year.
  • Dedicated to meeting the spiritual and educational needs of disturbed women, the community provided assistance to unwed mothers and women imprisoned in a life of prostitution, among other things.
  • Sister Faustina was always happy, humble, and conscientious, no matter what she was doing, whether it was cooking, gardening, or answering the door.
  • However, on the inside, the Lord was urging her to participate even more fully in His plan for the redemption of humanity by an extravagant union with Him, and she sensed it.

As Sister Faustina traveled across the world, she started to see visions of Jesus, who urged her to serve as His apostle and “Secretary of Mercy.” They wanted her to spread the word of God’s mercy across the globe and to plead God’s pity on sinners via innovative forms of devotion.

She meticulously recorded all of Christ’s statements as well as her personal meetings with Him in this book.

Until after her death, none of these incidents were known to anybody other than Sister Faustina’s spiritual director and superiors, and even her closest sisters were taken aback by the enormous pains and mystical experiences she had had.

Faustina lived a life of sacrifice in the background, always linking her sufferings with Christ’s Passion and participating with His purpose.

As a result of her humility, she did not consider her abilities to be the source of her sanctification, but rather the result of her obedience to God’s plan.

Faustina told Jesus.

When Pope John Paul II beatified her in 2000, her message of Divine Mercy continued to spread across the world, inspiring souls to place their confidence in Jesus and His compassion for them.

Feast Day is on October 5th. Rachel Ullmann is a writer and editor based in New York City. 2021-09-02T23:15:08-04:00

Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska

Maria Faustyna Kowalska, known in the Roman Catholic Church as Saint Faustina (born Helena Kowalska on August 25, 1905 in Gógowiec, Poland, and died on October 5, 1938 in Kraków, Poland), was a Polish nun who was canonized by the Catholic Church. Her life was marked by visions and talks with Jesus, which she recorded in a journal that was eventually published as The Diary of Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska: Divine Mercy in My Soul. Some of these rumored chats about the Divine Mercy devotion are included in her Vatican biographical sketches.

  • An artist was commissioned by Faustina and Sopocko to paint the first Divine Mercy painting, which was based on Faustina’s claimed vision of Jesus.
  • Faustina was canonized as a saint by the Roman Catholic Church on April 30, 2000, after years of being revered as a mystic and visionary by her contemporaries.
  • To learn more about St.
  • Wikipedia and Catholic Online were used as sources.

Saint Faustina Kowalska (1905-1938). Biography.

Maria Faustyna Kowalska, known in the Roman Catholic Church as Saint Faustina (born Helena Kowalska on August 25, 1905, in Gógowiec, Poland, and died on October 5, 1938, in Kraków, Poland), was a Polish nun who was canonized by the Catholic Church in the year 1938. She was born in Gógowiec, Poland, on August 25, 1905, and died in Kraków on October 5, 1938. Throughout her life, Faustina claimed to have had visions of Jesus and talks with him, which she recorded in a journal that was ultimately published as the book The Diary of Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska: Divine Mercy in My Soul.

After turning twenty, she entered a convent in Warsaw, was transferred to Plock, and then to Vilnius, where she met her confessor, Father Michael Sopocko, who encouraged her devotion to the Divine Mercy of Jesus Christ.

Faustina and Sopocko led the artist to paint the first Divine Mercy image.

After being revered as a mystic and a visionary, Faustina was canonized as a saint by the Roman Catholic Church on April 30, 2000, after her death.

Her title as the Apostle of Divine Mercy is well-known and revered throughout the Church. Please visit this page to learn more about St. Faustina. Information from Wikipedia and Catholic Online.

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