Which Style Is An Innovation By Yves Saint Laurent

Yves Saint Laurent Empowered Individual Style with Gender-Blurring Designs

The groundbreaking designer set out to redefine fashion and, over the course of his 40-year career, developed a slew of styles that are now regarded masterpieces of the genre. The date is September 13, 2020. The French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent claimed provocatively in 1969 that he was not offering “new style,” which would imply “new norms,” but rather “freedom.” The French fashion designer was a man of his word, and he was a pioneer in the field of “cross-design,” in which he used inspiration from street fashion to update haute couture.

He was the first couturier to create stores for both men and women, making him a pioneer in the industry.

By blurring the lines between men’s and women’s fashion, he emancipated individual style while also producing a scissor-sharp fashion look that was both sensuous and beautiful.

In Helmut Newton’s Rue Aubriot, 1975, photographed for FrenchVogue, a model is shown wearing Saint Laurent’s Le Smoking dress.

  1. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
  2. It is the newest addition to Assouline’s hefty handcrafted Ultimate Collection, a luxurious limited-edition collection that explores art and culture throughout history.
  3. They are presented in chronological sequence, with interspersions of his renowned fashion drawings, as well as historic pictures of people and places, interiors and exteriors, taken by such renowned lensmen as Richard Avedon, Guy Bourdin, and David Bailey, amongst others.
  4. At this time, who among the fashion elite hasn’t donned Le Smoking, as the garment became known?

Marisa Berensonis is pictured in his Paris apartment, one of many enticing interior shots — including the designer’s couture atelier, which was decorated by Jacques Grange; the exotic library at the Villa Oasis, which was decorated by Bill Willis; and Saint Laurent’s final residence in Marrakesh, which was decorated by Bill Willis.

  1. Horst of the man himself, resting on a multicolored mosaic of kilims and rugs in the villa’s garden, from a 1980 issue of Vogue, is also included in the collection of objects.
  2. Laurent’s Spring/Summer 1988 collection included this Van Gogh–inspired jacket, which was painstakingly hand embroidered by skilled artisans.
  3. In her rhapsodic introduction article, Saint Laurent specialist and fashion journalist Laurence Benam reminds out that it is impossible to cover all of the designer’s masterpieces.
  4. Benam, the author of the reference biography, was born in Algeria.
  5. Images used with permission from the Foundation Pierre Bergé and Yves Saint Laurent collaborated on this project.
  6. It was among Saint Laurent’s numerous known methods, which also included sensual draping and striking fabric juxtapositions, that he was able to achieve such a superb deployment of color.
  7. Christian Dior, the world’s most renowned couturier at the time, saw his outstanding sketches and recruited him on the spot just two years later, in 1955.
  8. In spite of his inexperience, Saint Laurent, at just 21, rose to the occasion and took on the challenge.

Yves Saint Laurent’s Lalanne evening dress from the Autumn 1969 haute couture collection (photo by Yves Saint Laurent/Alexandre Guirkinger); the July 1982 cover of La Mode en Peinturemagazine, featuring model Amalia Vairelli wearing an Indian ensemble from the Spring 1982 haute couture collection (photo by Assouline, Jean Lagarrigue); and a sheer dress with a snake belt from the Autumn 1968 haute couture collection (photo by Yves Saint Laurent Saint Laurent’s imagination also resulted in other highly coveted collectibles, such as the black crocodile motorcycle jacket, which served as an early indication of the designer’s passion for subverting (or is it obverting?) the anti-bourgeois beatniks of Paris’s Rive Gauche, who dominated the city’s street fashion scene at the time.

  • After being forced to serve in the harsh French military, Saint Laurent experienced a psychological breakdown and was fired from his position as creative director of Dior in 1962.
  • Together with Pierre Bergé, his then-lover who would go on to become his longtime business partner and friend, the designer established Yves Saint Laurent YSL in order to include prêt-à-porter, or ready-to-wear, collections.
  • Saint Laurent has given birth to a world-renowned fashion house.
  • This includes the renowned peacoat from his first haute couture show, a design that has been entirely absorbed today but that rocked the fashion world when it was originally introduced – a rugged-and-ready workman’s jacket for ladies of leisure?!
  • Christoph Sillem captured this image.
  • It is a good illustration of how Saint Laurent, an enthusiastic art lover and collector, turned to painters for inspiration, ranging from Goya to Picasso, Ingres to Matisse, among others.
  • Saint Laurent’s style is embodied in this design, which requires precise hand stitching of each color block so that when the garment is worn, the visual plain is as flat as a canvas, despite the body’s contours.

(Benam reminds us that one of the pattern cutters was a young Azzadine Alaia, who was a known perfectionist in his own right!) It is presented on the cover of ParisVogue and on British Sudanese model Alek Wek in a photography trifold by Christoph Sillem dated 1998, both of which feature the Mondrian outfit as a focal point.

  • The garment in the center is from Saint Laurent’s Bambara line, which debuted in Spring 1967 haute couture.
  • Yves Saint Laurent developed the 1967 African Bambara line of midriff-baring minidresses, one of which — as seen in the book — has totemic breast cones, decades before Madonna made the pointy breastplates of Gaultier’s corset famous.
  • The book also features sculptor Claude Lalanne’s bright galvanized-copper breastplate and torso plate, which she modeled on a naked Veruschka for Saint Laurent’s chiffon sheaths in 1969, as well as her dazzling galvanized-copper breastplate and torso plate.
  • He is credited with being the first designer to strip in order to sell, appearing in Jeanloup Sieff’s 1971 advertisement picture for YSL men’s cologne with nothing but long hair and glasses (but ladies purchased the perfume, too!).
  • In its place, a more discreetly provocative photograph of model Jean Shrimpton by David Bailey from the same year is shown.
  • He was interested by the “ambiguity,” he explained.
  • You can imagine the designer dismissing the subject matter.

The image is courtesy of Horst P.

At his finest, he channeled his anxious energy into infusing his creative imagination with everything that inspired him, just like any other artist.

“Nowhere is Saint Laurent more extravagant than in his brilliance,” said Cathy Horyn in the New York Times in 2000, referring to the designer’s excessiveness in his talent.

It took 670 hours, 250,000 sequins in 22 hues, and 250,000 pearls to create this piece, which was entirely hand stitched by Lesage on 273 yards of ribbon.

Yves Saint Laurent remarked four years before he announced his retirement in 2002, “I am no longer concerned with sensation and novelty, but with the refinement of my style.” On June 1, 2008, he passed away at his home in Paris, France, after a lengthy period of bad health.

One is left breathless by the time Yves Saint Laurent’s The Impossible Collection comes to a close.

The most exquisite designs from Saint Laurent are included in this collection.

By tearing down the conventional exclusivity of haute couture, he immediately and uncompromisingly democratized the beauty of the era he created.

Saint Laurent granted each and every individual the right to express and own their own individuality via his or her clothing. As he stated back in 2008, it is the way we currently live.

Shop Exceptional YSL Picks on 1stDibs

Shop Now Rachel Zabar Vintage is selling a dress with a lip print from 1971. Shop Now Dress in black crepe with bird print, 1978, offered by Jennifer Kobrin Shop Now Russian collection suede and leather tassel bag, 1990s, offered by Basha Gold Shop Now Color-block dinner jacket, 1980s, offered by Marlene Wetherell Vintage Fashion Shop Now Cotton shawl/pareo/dress, 1970s, offered by Brent Amerman Shop Now Rigid gold-toned arabesque hammered belt, 20th century, offered by Le 6 Rue Paradis Shop Now Black lace and tulle cocktail dress, Fall/Winter 1993, offered by One of a Kind Archive Shop Now Haute couture gold leather jacket, ca.

1986, offered by Vintage Luxury Shop Now Strapless chiffon cocktail dress with velvet bow, 1980s, offered by Fuchsia Treasures Corps Shop Now Rive Gauche black long-sleeved tuxedo jumpsuit, late 20th century, offered by Brent Amerman Shop Now Pleated silk chiffon ensemble, Spring/Summer 1979, offered by Julia’s Dressing Shop Now Haute couture cobalt-blue silk gown, Spring/Summer 1989, offered by Timeless Vixen

Ten Looks That Defined Yves Saint Laurent (Published 2017)

Yves Saint Laurent was a fashion designer who transformed the 20th century. The following are ten of his best hits, as T highlights his most recent successor, Anthony Vaccarello in front of his second presentation for the house on April 13. Image courtesy of the Fondation The Pierre Bergé Yves Saint Laurent store in Paris is owned by Alexandre Guirkinger. In 1960, Yves Saint Laurent debuted his “Beat” collection for Christian Dior, which was inspired by the existentialists of Paris’s bohemian Left Bank and debuted at the Paris Fashion Week.

  • A fashion designer had never before been overtly influenced by young culture, and the collection served as a forerunner to the whole youth-obsessed 1960s and the seismic upheaval that was about to disrupt the fashion industry.
  • The designer was replaced by Marc Bohan after he was recruited by the French army.
  • Image courtesy of the Fondation The Pierre Bergé Yves Saint Laurent store in Paris is owned by Alexandre Guirkinger.
  • In particular, this fur coat, with its big padded shoulders and vivid green tint, stood out from the crowd.
  • In this case, the “poor taste” was in recreating fashions from a time of suffering and occupation in France – many people perceived the outfits as evoking both the attire of the Vichy period and France’s collaboration with the Nazis after the Armistice of June 1940.
  • Image courtesy of the Fondation The Pierre Bergé Yves Saint Laurent store in Paris is owned by Alexandre Guirkinger.
  • The eye had been accustomed to a boyish female with no breasts, waist, or hips for many years.
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Even though the sinuous drape of this garment, which is draped with fox fur, is a world away from the space age trends of the 1960s, the sensual forms and designs, with a 1940s flare, that would be loved throughout the 1970s are clearly seen in this image.

When it was first displayed as part of Yves Saint Laurent’s fall/winter 1965 haute couture show, this jersey shift dress — one of a series of gowns in the collection devoted to the artist’s geometric works — generated quite a stir.

The colored blocks and black bands from Piet Mondrian’s original artwork are sewn into the clothing rather than printed, so that all of the darts and fit seams are lost in the picture of the painting.

Yves Saint Laurent launched a series of collections in the second part of the 1970s that explored folkloric garb, the most well-known of which being his Ballets Russes collection from 1976, which was called “Rich Peasant” or “Hippy de luxe” by the press.

A light corset top with lace at the front was a standout item.

Image courtesy of the Fondation The Pierre Bergé Yves Saint Laurent store in Paris is owned by Alexandre Guirkinger.

As a result of its location on the Left Bank — the same neighborhood that served as the inspiration for his “Beat” collection for Dior — he named the enterprise “Rive Gauche.” In retrospect, this was a watershed moment: a couturier producing mass-produced clothing with the same level of creativity and attention that he put into his haute couture designs.

Alexandre Guirkinger contributed to this image from the Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent in Paris.

Many of his garments were inspired by major works of art, such as evening ensembles created in tribute to Pierre Bonnard, capes evoking Braque, and a pair of evening jackets heavily embroidered with Vincent Van Gogh’s irises and sunflowers, which cost more than $100,000 and were sold at auction for more than $1 million.

Its rock-crystal and gold decorations, which are meant to replicate the mirrors and chandeliers of Yves Saint Laurent’s couture salons at 5 Avenue Marceau, were given the moniker “Hommage à moi maison”— “Tribute to my couture house.” The homage, on the other hand, was paid more to the individuals who lived there than to the structure itself.

  1. The ornamentation alone took over 700 hours of labor to complete on this item.
  2. By the end of the 1960s, Yves Saint Laurent’s place in fashion history had been cemented.
  3. In 1968, he bared his breasts to gasps from the audience.
  4. A partnership with artist Claude Lalanne resulted in this outfit, which has sculptures in gold-galvanized copper that are worn over chiffon evening gowns.
  5. Image courtesy of the Fondation The Pierre Bergé Yves Saint Laurent store in Paris is owned by Alexandre Guirkinger.

In his “Robin Hood” collection, thigh-high crocodile boots were worn with oilskin tunics and leather hooded caps, all of which were a nod to the leather jackets that had outraged Dior three years before; it was only three years later that Saint Laurent was pushing the boundaries of couture to new heights.

Image courtesy of the Fondation The Pierre Bergé Yves Saint Laurent store in Paris is owned by Alexandre Guirkinger.

Their respective styles become intimately entwined over time.

Deneuve had been one of the boutique’s initial clients in 1966, when she purchased a trouser suit, a scarlet coat, a jersey dress, and numerous suede miniskirts, which she had them tailored to be even shorter than they were. The following is related:Inside the New Saint Laurent

7 major ways Yves Saint Laurent changed fashion forever

Yves Saint Laurent was a fashion designer who changed the course of history in the early twentieth century. The following are ten of his best hits, as T highlights his most recent successor, Anthony Vaccarello in front of his second concert for the house on April 12. Foundation for Scientific Research (FSR) image credit Alexander Guirkinger photographed by Pierre Bergé for Yves Saint Laurent in Paris. “Beat” was a collection by Yves Saint Laurent for Christian Dior that was inspired by the existentialists of Paris’s bohemian Left Bank and first shown in 1960.

  • A fashion designer had never before been overtly influenced by young culture, and the collection served as a forerunner to the whole youth-obsessed 1960s, as well as the seismic upheaval that was about to rock the fashion industry.
  • The designer was replaced by Marc Bohan after he was recruited by the army.
  • Foundation for Scientific Research (FSR) image credit Alexander Guirkinger photographed by Pierre Bergé for Yves Saint Laurent in Paris.
  • In particular, this fur coat, with its big padded shoulders and vibrant green tint, stood out from the crowd.
  • In this case, the “poor taste” was in recreating fashions from a time of suffering and occupation in France – many people perceived the outfits as evoking both the attire of the Vichy regime and France’s participation with the Nazis following the Armistice of June 1940.
  • Foundation for Scientific Research (FSR) image credit Alexander Guirkinger photographed by Pierre Bergé for Yves Saint Laurent in Paris.

” That same year, Saint Laurent told The New York Times, “I never imagined the look of a genuine lady would cause such a stir.” Even though the sinuous drape of this dress, which is draped with fox fur, is a world away from the space age trends of the 1960s, the sensual forms and designs, with a 1940s flare, that would be appreciated throughout the 1970s are clearly seen in this garment.

  • When it was first displayed as part of Yves Saint Laurent’s fall/winter 1965 haute couture show, this jersey shift dress — one of a series of gowns in the collection devoted to the artist’s geometric works — generated quite a stir.
  • The colored blocks and black bands from Piet Mondrian’s original artwork are seamed into the garment, rather than printed, so that all of the darts and fit seams are lost in the picture of the painting.
  • Yves Saint Laurent launched a series of collections in the second part of the 1970s that explored folkloric garb, the most well-known of which being his Ballets Russes collection from 1976, which was nicknamed “Rich Peasant” or “Hippy de luxe” by some.
  • Light, front-laced corset tops were essential for this look.
  • Foundation for Scientific Research (FSR) image credit Alexander Guirkinger photographed by Pierre Bergé for Yves Saint Laurent in Paris.
  • Given its location on the Left Bank — the neighborhood that inspired his “Beat” collection for Dior — he dubbed the enterprise “Rive Gauche” in honor of the region.
  • The “Saharienne,” or safari jacket, was one of the designs he introduced.

Alexandre Guirkinger contributed to this image via the Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent in Paris.

His own trademarks were refined and his works, particularly in the realm of haute couture, were pushed to new heights from then until he retired in 2002.

A number of homages were included in his haute couture collection for spring/summer 1990, including tributes to his mentor Christian Dior, inspiration he found in the work of Coco Chanel, and his own couture house.

More than the structure itself, this memorial was intended to pay tribute to the individuals that resided within it.

Including the decoration, this item represents 700 hours of labor.

It was the end of the 1960s when Yves Saint Laurent’s place in fashion history was certain.

His breasts were again seen in 1968, prompting gasps from many in the audience.

These evening gowns were designed in partnership with the artist Claude Lalanne who made a series of sculptures in gold-galvanized copper, which were worn over chiffon evening dresses.

Foundation for Scientific Research (FSR) image credit Alexander Guirkinger photographed by Pierre Bergé for Yves Saint Laurent in Paris.

In his “Robin Hood” collection, thigh-high crocodile boots were worn with oilskin tunics and leather hooded caps, all of which were a nod to the leather jackets that had so enraged Dior three years before; it was only three years later that Saint Laurent was pushing the boundaries of haute couture to new heights.

Foundation for Scientific Research (FSR) image credit Alexander Guirkinger photographed by Pierre Bergé for Yves Saint Laurent in Paris.

Their respective aesthetics become inexorably linked with one another.

A trouser suit, a scarlet coat, a jersey dress, and various suede miniskirts were among Deneuve’s first purchases from the store in 1966, and she requested that they be made even shorter for her. Related: Saint Laurent: A Look Inside

Yves Saint Laurent

“Fashion comes and goes, but style endures forever” (Yves Saint Laurent). Some designers have developed garments that have not only remained fashionable but have also altered the course of fashion history. Yves Saint Laurent, better known by his brand name, YSL, was a fashion designer and influencer who began his career in the 1960s and continued until his death in 2011. It wasn’t long before his remarkable fashion ideas were popular throughout Europe, and subsequently around the world. Even though he has passed away, his impact and life-changing creations will live on in the hearts and minds of those who knew him.

  1. While Yves Saint Laurent was a fashion and style creator, he was also a very influential person who pushed people to be themselves and stand out from the crowd.
  2. Saint Laurent stood by his groundbreaking and one-of-a-kind creations, which went on to become the fashion of the future.
  3. Women’s fashion had been liberated from the stereotypes that formerly surrounded it, providing more women the confidence that they may have lacked in the past, as well as motivating others to try out new looks.
  4. Another example that demonstrates how innovative and futuristic his clothes was is given in, “By the 1970’s he had established a style of women’s day wear that was influenced by typically “male” apparel such as blazers, slacks, and shirts¨.
  5. Saint Laurent made designs that were influenced by manly styles and wooed a large number of individuals at the time.
  6. He had an idea to transform the fashion industry, and his inventive work propelled him to the top of the fashion industry as one of the world’s first futuristic designers.
  7. At a young age, he demonstrates his support and dedication to his profession by saying the following: “His mother was a fashion enthusiast, and she fostered her son’s interest in the field from an early age.
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The International Wool Secretariat dress-designing competition awarded Saint Laurent third place, and his mother sent him to Paris so that he could meet individuals in the fashion industry.” ” (“Yves Saint Laurent.”).

Saint Laurent was inspired and encouraged to be a great designer by his previous successor, Christian Dior, who was also an inspiration and encourager to him.

Another example of his support for others is demonstrated by the following: “When it comes to feminizing the fundamental forms of the masculine wardrobe, Saint Laurent is the undisputed leader in the world of high fashion.

Following the work of designers who came before him, Yves Saint Laurent “created an entirely new vocabulary” that encouraged women to be themselves rather than conform to the fashion stereotypes of the day.

Overall, it was Saint Laurent’s enthusiasm and encouragement that propelled him to become an incredible designer as well as a supportive and encouraging person.

It’s difficult to fathom what clothing we’d be wearing now if he hadn’t had such a profound impact on both men and women.

In the course of my career, I have learnt that the most essential thing about a garment is the lady who is wearing it” (Saint Laurent).

He thought that without a beautiful person on the inside and outside, clothes would not be as attractive as it may be.

Works Cited Francois Baudot’s Fashion in the Twentieth Century is a must-read.

Pierre Berge is the author of this work.

BBC News, BBC, BBC, 2 June 2008.

Biography.com Editors, editors, editors “Yves Saint Laurent,” the designer says.

Biography.com, A E Networks Television, 2 April 2014.

CHRISTIAN LACROIX is a fictional character created by Christian Lacroix.

BBC News, BBC, BBC, 2 June 2008.

Yves Saint Laurent is a fashion designer.

Accessed on the 4th of May, 2017.

1.

Gale Publishing Company published Contemporary Fashion in 2002.

Accessed on the 1st of May, 2017.

Gale Publishing Company published Newsmakers, Vol.

Gale Group Publishing Company’s Biography in Context is available at http://apps.galegroup.com/2016/18004939/BIC1?u=powa9245 xid=d14528bb.

On the 27th of April, 2017, the website was accessed. In this hero contribution posted on the website, the author’s beliefs, ideas, and opinions are stated. These views do not necessarily reflect those of The MY HERO Project or its personnel.

A Glimpse into the Style Genius of Yves Saint Laurent – Washington Life Magazine

The YSL show at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts is a sensory-stimulating journey across time and space. Virginia Coyne captured this image. Yves Saint Laurent is one of the few designers who has truly grasped the female form. A youngster when he began drawing garments, the Algerian-born French genius went on to become one of the most prolific fashion designers of the twentieth century. His creative journey was meticulously documented by Pierre Bergé, his longtime business and personal partner, who, together with Saint Laurent, established the Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent in order to share more than 40 years’ worth of haute couture pieces, accessories, mood boards, photographs, and drawings that define the designer’s creative legacy with the general public.

  • Samples of fabrics and sketches provide insight into the design process at YSL.
  • “Yves Saint Laurent: The Perfection of Style” is the result of a collaboration between French historian Florence Müller and Chiyo Ishikawa of the Seattle Art Museum, who assembled a spectacular selection of the foundation’s collection.
  • “I am no longer concerned with sensation and novelty, but rather with the perfection of my personal style,” says the designer.
  • These wise remarks from the artist, which serve as the exhibition’s opening statement, provide insight into his reluctance to adapt to passing fashions or persistent gender standards.

Christian Dior was impressed with Saint Laurent’s winning version of a party dress, and he eventually hired Saint Laurent as his assistant, or, in Dior’s words, “my right arm.” When Dior died unexpectedly in 1957, Saint Laurent was appointed to the position of chief designer despite the fact that he was just 21 at the time.

(An example of a dress from the collection is seen here.) A short evening dress in the color “Elephant Blanc” designed by Yves Saint Laurent for Christian Dior’s “Trapeze” collection.

The black-patent crocodile and mink jacket (“Chicago”) from Saint Laurent’s collection for Dior in 1960 proved too avant-garde for the conservative fashion house.

Visitors may observe first-hand how Saint Laurent’s style evolved in unison with other collections of art, culture, and history on display throughout the museum.

For example, Saint Laurent experimented with the concept of contradiction, and no item exemplifies this more than his sheer pantsuit, which the show description describes as Saint Laurent’s inclination to “push the emblems of bourgeois propriety into vulgar violation.” His gender-bending collection, inspired by trouser suits and tuxedos but designed to flatter the feminine body, was created in the same spirit of contradiction as his other collections.

  1. Three ensembles from the “Contradictory Impulses” series on display during the exhibition.
  2. (Image courtesy of Alexandre Guirkinger) The grand finale of the exhibition culminates in a color explosion of YSL evening attire, which is accompanied by color swatches and notes that dictated Saint Laurent’s design process throughout the exhibition.
  3. David Stover captured this image.
  4. Not to be missed is Andy Warhol’s picture of Yves Saint Laurent, which is located near the conclusion of the exhibition.
  5. Ticket reservations must be made in advance, either onlineHERE or by phone at (804) 340-1405.
  6. Members of the VMFA are admitted free of charge.
  7. The VFMA, which has been in operation for 80 years, contains a significant collection of art spanning more than 5,000 years.

The museum boasts one of the most valuable collections of art in the country, with approximately 35,000 items in total. The general public is admitted free of charge. More information may be found at www.vmfa.museum.

Yves Saint Laurent- A Mastermind

Classics were not always ageless. There was a time when they were novel, innovative, and ground-breaking. Classics are today admired for their simplicity, yet they were all created with a creative eye and a willingness to experiment. Throughout history, tastemakers have incorporated classics into our fashion history, which have been made famous by icons, and have been built upon and updated. Chanel, Dior, and YSL were just a few of the renowned designers and businesses that we learned about in another week of Fashion History class.

  1. I intend to cover everything YSL in my blog, including the designer, the brand, the history, and the company’s legacy.
  2. Saint Laurent was born in the Algerian city of Oran in 1936.
  3. Michel de Brunoff, the editor-in-chief of French Vogue, introduced him to Christian Dior shortly after his arrival.
  4. He was only 21 years old at the time.
  5. Saint Laurent did not remain at Dior for an extended period of time.
  6. The creation of Saint Laurent’s own label, YSL, was made possible by the financial support of his long-term boyfriend, Pierre Bergé.
  7. He was able to adapt runway designs into more wearable styles.
  8. He embraced contrast — the masculine and the feminine, the highbrow and the lowbrow, the classic and the new — in order to produce pieces that are both sharp and still relevant today.
  9. He took traditionally masculine shapes and reworked them into womenswear, giving women the confidence to dress in a different and more daring way.
  10. Le Smoking Suit is a type of suit that is worn while smoking.

Fashion House/Company Timeline:

I’ve been looking through numerous online pages, and there is a plethora of information about YSL available.

I’ve developed a timeline of the brand’s history since its start in order to highlight some of the brand’s major milestones:

  • The Yves Saint Laurent Couture firm is established in 1961 with the assistance of Pierre Berge
  • In 1962, Yves Saint Laurent displays his first line of clothing. Catherine Deneuve was the first person to hire him.

In his inaugural runway show, Yves St Laurent used ethnic models and drew inspiration from different cultures, making him the first designer to do so. One of his most renowned ethnic muses was the Somali supermodel Iman, who was one of his most famous ethnic muses. Yves Saint Laurent starts his first ready-to-wear store in Paris in 1966, which is known as Rive Gauche. YSL is also the recipient of the Harpers Bazaar Award.

  • Tchou, the publisher, and Lulu. Le Smoking tailor tuxedo suit was first launched in the YSL Spring Collection
  • The 1971 Spring-Summer collection, sometimes known as the “40’s” collection, is the subject of a scandal. The debut of the YSL perfume ‘Rive Gauche’

FUN FACT: The ’40s collection sparked such a debate because some felt it romanticized the German occupation of France during World War II, while others said it brought back the ugliness of utilitarianism that characterized the decade.

  • 1976- The creation and celebration of the ‘Russian Collection.’ 1977- The creation and introduction of the perfume ‘Opium.’ 1978- The creation and celebration of the ‘Russian Collection.’
  • Marguerite Yourcenar’s costume for her admittance to the Académie Française is designed by YSL in 1981. 1982- At the 20th anniversary celebration of his couture company, Yves St Laurent is presented with the International Award of the Council of Fashion Designers of America. The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City hosts a retrospective exhibition of Yves St Laurent’s life’s work in 1983, titled Retrospective.
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FACT: This is the first time in the museum’s history that a live artist’s work has been displayed in this space.

  • The Palace of Fine Arts in Beijing is hosting a retrospective exhibition of the artist’s work from 1985. The French President presents Yves St Laurent with the Legion of Honor. 1986- Retrospective exhibitions are held at the Musée des arts de la mode in Paris and the New Tratiekov Gallery in Moscow
  • 1987- Retrospective exhibitions are held at the Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg and the New South Wales Art Gallery in Sydney, Australia
  • 1988- Retrospective exhibitions are held at the Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg and the New South Wales Art Gallery in Sydney, Australia. The Sezon Museum of Art in Tokyo hosts an exhibition of Yves St Laurent’s work in 1990. At the Bastille Opera, YSL celebrates the 30th anniversary of his couture firm
  • 1992- For $600,000,000, the fashion house YSL was sold to the pharmaceutical firm Sanofi in 1993. In preparation for the 1998 FIFA World Cup, Yves St Laurent performs a fashion presentation on the pitch of the Grand Stade de France, with 300 models. Alber Elbaz, who is presently the creative director of Lanvin, produced three collections for the house of YSL between 1998 and 1999. A year later, YSL was purchased by Gucci, with Tom Ford designing the ready to wear line and St Laurent designing the Haute Couture line. Stefano Pilati joins Yves St Laurent in 2000 to oversee the company’s ready-to-wear clothes design. He started off directing the women’s line, but was eventually upgraded to include the men’s line as well. 2002- On the 7th of January, Yves St Laurent announces his retirement.

Stefano Pilati is a well-known figure in the fashion industry.

  • The month of June 2002 saw the promotion of Stefano Pilati to the position of head of design for all Yves St Laurent product lines, including accessories. After Tom Ford’s departure from YSL in 2004, Stefano Pilati is appointed as the company’s Creative Director. 2008- On June 1st, Monsieur Yves Saint Laurent succumbs of brain cancer at his Parisian residence. The year 2012 saw Hedi Slimane take over as Creative Director at YSL, which changes its name to St Laurent while keeping the same logo.

CONCLUSION

Interesting about the brand is how it has managed to keep its authenticity and brand foundations despite the fact that times and designers have changed throughout the years. Even after decades in the business, their design ideas have remained the same: sleek, sophisticated, androgynous. It is possible to carry on the work of YSL’s legacy in his absence with the same attitude that consumers have come to connect the brand with in his absence. A YSL piece will remain a staple in your collection despite the passage of time and shifting fashion trends.

It’s something to be proud of since it’s beautiful, elegant, and well-made.

Yves Saint Laurent: The Perfection of Style: Müller, Florence, Berge, Pierre, Rorschach, Kimerly: 9780847849420: Amazon.com: Books

Fashion historian Florence Muller provides an intimate glimpse behind the scenes of her studio through original drawings, runway pictures, and photographs. — The Book, available at Neiman Marcus In eight thematic areas, there are 110 ensembles that highlight his achievements and the sources of his inspiration, including the “Paper Doll Couture House” that he designed as a youngster. —Crave on the internet “Florence Muller, a fashion historian, contributes her YSL knowledge to this work, which investigates his creative process and inspirations.

Learn about the inspirations that went into the designs that helped to revolutionize haute couture.” In the Society Diaries, there is a phrase that says With an introduction by Pierre Bergé, the new book gives a unique peek inside Yves Saint Laurent’s universe, despite the fact that it is not the first to do so.

— New York Journal of Books (New York, NY, USA)

About the Author

Yves Saint Laurent Couture House cofounder Pierre Bergé is also the president of Fondation Pierre Bergé–Yves Saint Laurent, which is dedicated to preserving the legacy of the fashion designer.Kimerly Rorschachiis the Illsley Ball Nordstrom Director and CEO of the Seattle Art Museum.Florence Mülleris a highly regarded fashion historian who has written extensively on Yves Saint Laurent and other renowned designers.Pierre Bergé is the cofounder of Yves

Book

An up-close and personal look at the renowned designer and his work, showcasing his artistic process and influencing influences. Haute couture is being modernized. High-end ready-to-wear that is a first in the industry. Making women’s clothes more comfortable in a masculine way. The legendary fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent’s name follows him—but what about the guy who created his creations? Florence Müller, a fashion historian and YSL specialist, follows Saint Laurent’s career from his early days as an ambitious designer through his time as Christian Dior’s protégé and then as the director of his own fashion business from 1961 to 2002.

  • The reader is also given an inside look at the atelier.
  • (1966).
  • Saint Laurent’s daring garments for the modern lady, which are described in exquisite detail in this book, continue to fascinate fashion aficionados and admirers of art and design for their creativity and purity of style, as seen in this concentrated investigation of the fashion house.
  • Jean-Paul Bergé is the originator of the Yves Saint Laurent Couture House and the president of the Fondation Pierre Bergé–Yves Saint Laurent, which is committed to preserving the heritage of the late fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent.
  • Release Date:October 11, 2016
  • Format:Hardcover
  • Category:Design – FashionAccessories
  • Publisher:Skira Rizzoli
  • Trim Size:7-1/4 x 11
  • Pages:168
  • US Price:$45.00
  • CDN Price:$60.00
  • ISBN:978-0-8478-4942-0
  • ISBN-13: 978-0-8478-4942-0

Fashion historian Florence Muller provides an intimate glimpse behind the scenes of her studio through original drawings, runway pictures, and photographs. — The Book, available at Neiman Marcus In eight thematic areas, there are 110 ensembles that highlight his achievements and the sources of his inspiration, including the “Paper Doll Couture House” that he designed as a youngster. —Crave on the internet “Florence Muller, a fashion historian, contributes her YSL knowledge to this work, which investigates his creative process and inspirations.

Learn about the inspirations that went into the designs that helped to revolutionize haute couture.” In the Society Diaries, there is a phrase that says With an introduction by Pierre Bergé, the new book gives a unique peek inside Yves Saint Laurent’s universe, despite the fact that it is not the first to do so.

– HarpersBazaar.com, a fashion magazine Those who are interested in the guy or the fashion world during the twentieth century and beyond will find this book to be a valuable resource. — New York Journal of Books (New York, NY, USA)

Notes on Yves Saint Laurent

It should come as no surprise that museums serve as a big source of inspiration for me, given that linked learning originated in informal learning venues such as libraries, museums, fan clubs, and online communities. The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts is now hosting an exhibition by Yves Saint Laurent, and it did not disappoint. The seamless integration of method and product to communicate the story was the most remarkable aspect. There was very little text on the page (although what was there was choice, encouraging us to consider beauty and fashion through lenses of gender, sexuality, class, and race).

In addition to the hundred gowns on display, we were surrounded by many more fashion collection boards, fabric swathes and pictures; dress molds; costume jewelry; and coffee table novels (to name a few of the items on display) (YSL was inspired by Velazquez and architects, apparently, as well as Warhol and Mondrian).

Of course, the gowns were stunning, but we spent the most of our time delving into the creative process behind YSL.

My spouse was somewhat aback by the fact that YSL had kept the same design methodology for more than three decades.

The taxonomic organization is the same.

After years of experimentation, YSL figured out what worked in his method, as evidenced by the introductory quotation from the exhibit: “I am no longer concerned with sensation or novelty, but with the perfection of my style.” The show includes over one hundred collecting boards, each of which is unique.

” data-medium-file=” data-large-file=” data-small-file=”” src=” h=349″ alt=”A fashion collection board from the show” width=”350″ height=”349″ src=” h=349″ alt=”A fashion collection board from the exhibit” width=”350″ height=”349″ srcset=srcset=srcset “h=349 350 watts, h=698 700 watts, h=150 150 watts, h=300 300 watts ” In the display, there are about one hundred collection boards.

These boards, which were arranged according to chronological order, were my favorite section of the show.

My children, on the other hand, were more interested in the exhibit design, notably the color-coded organization of the show.

They take note of design, both instructional and non-instructional.

In any case, it’s difficult to predict how this will affect my present program evaluation and instructional design work — all I know is that it will, because museum displays always have an impact on people. The featured image is mine, courtesy of @googleguacamole on Instagram.

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