Where Was Saint Augustine Born

Saint Augustine

Frequently Asked Questions

Who is St. Augustine?

Augustine of Hippo, also known as Saint Augustine of Hippo, original Latin name Aurelius Augustinus, (born November 13, 354 in Tagaste, Numidia—died August 28, 430 in Hippo Regius; feast day August 28),bishop of Hippo from 396 to 430, one of the Latin Fathers of the Church and, after St. Paul, perhaps the most influential Christian thinker of the second century. Augustine’s application of classical ideas to Christian teaching resulted in a theological system that has had a significant and long-lasting impact on the world.

He is technically acknowledged as an adoctor of the church in the Roman Catholic faith.

  1. His prominence would have been more comparable to that of some of his contemporaries had no written works remained, but he would still have been a significant person in his own right if none of his written works had survived.
  2. His peculiar theological approach molded LatinChristianity in a way that was second only to the influence of the Bible itself.
  3. Augustine symbolizes the most influential integration of the ancientPlatonictradition with Christian concepts that has ever occurred in the Latin Christian culture, both intellectually and philosophically.
  4. In many respects, both modern Roman Catholic and Protestant Christianity are indebted to the ideas of Augustine, but in other ways each group has been ashamed to acknowledge that loyalty in the face of irreconcilable components in his thought.

According to certain scholars and historians, Augustine has been described as both a champion of human liberty and an outspoken defender of divine determinism, and while his ideas on sexuality were compassionate in design, they have frequently been perceived as restrictive in practice.

Life overview

Augustine of Hippo, also known as Saint Augustine of Hippo, original Latin name Aurelius Augustinus, (born November 13, 354 in Tagaste, Numidia—died August 28, 430 in Hippo Regius; feast day August 28),bishop of Hippo from 396 to 430, one of the Latin Fathers of the Church and, after St. Paul, perhaps the most influential Christian thinker in history. Augustine’s application of classical ideas to Christian teaching resulted in a theological framework that has had a significant and long-lasting impact on Christian thought.

  1. he is properly acknowledged as an adoctor of the church in the Roman Catholic tradition.
  2. His stature might have been more comparable to that of some of his contemporaries had no written works remained, but he would still have been a significant person in his own right.
  3. Aside from Scripture itself, his peculiar theological approach had a significant impact on Latin Christianity.
  4. Augustine symbolizes the most important integration of the ancientPlatonictradition with Christian concepts that has ever occurred in the Latin Christian culture, both intellectually and historically.
  5. Both contemporary Roman Catholicism and Protestant Christianity owe a debt of gratitude to Augustine, while in certain respects each group has felt embarrassment in acknowledging that debt in the face of irreconcilable components in Augustine’s philosophy.

St. Augustine Biography

Background Information about the Author On November 13, 354 at the village of Thagaste, on what is now Algeria’s northern coast, Saint Augustine of Hippo was born. He was the first Christian martyr to be martyred. North Africa was a component of the Roman Empire, however it was seen as something of a backwater since it was so far away from the imperial centers of authority. It is believed that Augustine’s father Patricius (or Patrick) was adecurio, or a low-ranking officer in the Roman empire.

  • As a result of this obligation, the family’s finances were likely put under continual strain, which may explain Augustine’s claims that his family was impoverished.
  • In addition to being a pagan, Patricius was also a follower of the Roman civic religion.
  • Patricius was just a lukewarm Christian, but he enabled Monica to raise the couple’s children as Christians, and he eventually committed to Christianity before his death in a car accident.
  • Patricius, on the other hand, had little impact on Augustine’s personality, and Patricius emerges in the Confessions as a remote and ambiguous figure.
  • He was sent to the adjacent town of Madaura for further studies, but due to a lack of funds, he was obliged to return home to Thagaste for a year, during which time his father attempted to save more money to cover the cost of tuition.
  • Augustine’s parents were more concerned with his academic performance than with his personal behavior.
  • He studied literature and poetry there in preparation for a future as a rhetor, a professional public speaker and rhetorical educator.

In Carthage, he established a home with a concubine, who would later become the mother of his son, Adeodatus, who was born about 372.

He believes this book instilled in him the drive to pursue truth in whatever form he may find it.

Attracted to Manichaeism by its clear demarcation between good and evil, its highly intellectual mythology, and its severe moral standards, Augustine studied it for several years.

Augustine went on to have a thriving career as a public speaker and educator.

Despite the fact that Augustine’s time in Rome was unsatisfactory, his abilities grabbed the attention of a Roman official, who nominated Augustine for the job of public orator for the imperial city of Milan.

The application of Neo-Platonic ideas to the interpretation of Christian scripture, presented with Ambrose’s famous eloquence, piqued Augustine’s interest.

Throughout his life, Augustine had been growing more disillusioned with Manichaeism, and Ambrose’s influence led him to end his association with them.

Meanwhile, Augustine’s professional life was thriving, and his long-term prospects seemed promising.

In the fall of 386, he had a conversion experience that led him to sacrifice his professional ambitions and future marriage chances in order to devote his life entirely to the service of God.

He was ultimately baptized by Bishop Ambrose on Easter Sunday in 387.

They were on their way back to Africa when they were delayed.

After his exile from Rome, Augustine retreated to Thagaste, where he lived on his family’s farm in a tiny quasi-monastic community until his death in 389.

In 391, he traveled to the city of Hippo Regius, which is about 60 miles away from Thagaste, with the intention of establishing a monastery, but he ended up being conscripted into the priesthood by a Christian congregation in the city of Hippo Regius instead.

Over the following 35 years, he spent his time preaching, celebrating mass with his congregation, mediating local issues, and ministering to them.

As a result of this division, the Christian church in North Africa was split into two competing groups, the Donatists and the Catholics.

Following the end of the persecutions, the Catholic Church re-admitted those Christians who had publicly repented of having renounced their Christian faith.

Furthermore, they refused to acknowledge any priests or bishops other than their own, claiming that the Catholic bishops had been anointed by traitors and hence were not legitimate.

Augustine attempted diplomacy with the Donatists at initially, but they rejected his efforts, leading him to advocate for the use of force against them in the long run.

Although Donatism was outlawed by the Roman authority in 405, the fight persisted until 411.

Donatism was stifled by the imposition of heavy legal sanctions.

A disaster shook the Roman world during the height of the Donatist conflict.

Rome was the symbolic capital of an empire that had dominated the known world for hundreds of years.

As a result, Augustine began composing his greatest masterwork, The City of God Against the Pagans, which he labored on for 15 years and is considered his best achievement.

At around the same time as Rome was falling, a religious movement known as Pelagianism began to spread throughout the church, calling for a fundamental renewal of spiritual and physical discipline.

Pelagius was appalled by what he perceived to be the apparent helplessness of human beings implied by Augustine’s words.

Pelagius maintained that human beings may choose to reach moral perfection through pure power of will — and not only that they can, but that they must — and that this is the only way for them to be happy.

Christians may and should try to be good, but they must also acknowledge their fallen position and their reliance on God’s grace in order to do so.

In any case, Pelagianism continued to have a significant influence, and Augustine spent his final years engaged in a long-distance debate with Julian of Eclanum, a brilliant and articulate advocate of Pelagianism.

Augustine associated the birth of sexual desire with the beginning of human disobedience, which he said was the result of Adam and Eve’s original sin, which blemished all of humanity.

He was adamant that sexual desire was merely another of the physical senses and that God’s justice would not punish the entire human race as a result of the disobedience of a single individual.

In light of Augustine’s contention that only God’s grace can drive human beings toward salvation, the question of how God selects those who would be saved became essential.

A form of uprising broke out among numerous French monastic communities in the year 428 as a result of this argument.

Augustine agreed that predestination was a tough topic in answer to letters from the monks, but he refused to concede the argument.

The Vandals, another barbarian tribe from Europe, invaded north Africa in 429, bringing the region under their control.

According to Augustine’s biographer, Possidius, he spent the last days of his life studying the penitential psalms that he had posted on the walls of his room and weeping over his sins, as well as praying for the conversion of others.

He died on August 28, 430, at the age of 75, and thus did not live to witness the Vandals’ invasion and conquest of Hippo in 431.

Augustine had a tremendous impact on the civilisation that succeeded it, the Christianized civilization of Medieval Europe, and he was a major figure in that development.

Many of these works have not yet been translated into English, despite the fact that a huge translation initiative is now under process in this country.

The labor of Augustine and his companion and biographer Possidius, despite the fact that he never completed this assignment, provided future readers with a well-documented list of Augustine’s writings.

Augustine was born in 397 and died in 427.

Who was St. Augustine? Everything You Need to Know

Background Information on the Author On November 13, 354 in the town of Thagaste, on what is now Algeria’s northern coast, Saint Augustine of Hippo was born. Saint Augustine of Hippo was the first Christian martyr to be beatified. Despite the fact that North Africa was a part of the Roman Empire, it was regarded as something of a backwater, located far from the imperial centers of power. In the Roman empire, Augustine’s father, Patricius (or Patrick), was adecurio, a subordinate official. Despite this, adecurio’s position was far from glamorous, as he was expected to serve as a patron for his community and make up for any shortfalls in taxes collected from the surrounding area.

  • Augustine had at least one brother, Navigius, as well as at least one sister, but there is little information available about his family members.
  • Christian upbringing had been the norm for Augustine’s mother, Monica (also spelled Monnica).
  • Early in Augustine’s life, the example of his mother’s fervent faith had a profound impact on him, and this influence would last the rest of his life.
  • The early success of Augustine in school led to the sacrifice and savings of Augustine’s parents, who spent their money and time to provide their son with a good Roman education in the hope that it would lead to a successful career.
  • Augustine describes himself as a dissolute young man who was not restrained by his parents, who were more concerned with his academic success than with his personal behavior.
  • The university in Carthage, the region’s largest city, was where Augustine went to study when he was about 16 years old.
  • Augustine’s father died shortly after he arrived in Carthage, leaving Augustine as the family’s de facto leader.

His spiritual journey began during this time, when he read Cicero’s Hortensius, which, according to him, inspired him with the desire to seek truth in whatever form he might find it.

Augustine also came into contact with Manichaeism while in Carthage, which became the religion that would dominate his life for the next ten years after his arrival.

Once Augustine had completed his studies, he briefly returned to Thagaste to teach, but he soon moved on to Carthage, where there were more opportunities for him there.

In 383, he traveled to Rome, where he hoped to further his professional development with the help of wealthy Manichee friends.

Bishop Ambrose’s sermons influenced Augustine’s decision to relocate to Milan in 384.

Augustine had previously considered Christianity to be intellectually deficient, but his interest was piqued by Ambrose’s application of Neo-Platonic ideas to the interpretation of Christian scripture.

It was Augustine himself who first became acquainted with the works of the Neo-Platonists, and it was this encounter that transformed his understanding of Christian doctrine.

In Milan, Augustine’s mother had followed him, and she arranged for him to marry a Christian girl from a respectable family, forcing Augustine to divorce his concubine.

A group of like-minded friends and he spent the winter away from the outside world, reading and discussing Christianity.

His group of friends and family were delayed at the coastal city of Ostia, where Monica became ill and died.

Augustine’s life story, as told in the Confessions, comes to a close around the time of his 35th birthday, but his life’s work was just getting started.

Augustine’s abilities, on the other hand, continued to be noticed.

However, a Christian congregation in Hippo Regius persuaded him to become a priest.

The next 35 years were devoted to preaching and celebrating Mass as well as mediating local disputes and ministering to the members of his parish.

As a result of this division, the Christian church in North Africa was divided into two opposing factions: the Donatists and the Catholics.

Some converted to Christianity in order to avoid torture and execution, while others chose martyrdom as a means of defending their religion.

Anyone wishing to rejoin the church, however, would have to be rebaptized, according to the Donatists.

By the 390s, the disagreement had escalated to the point of violence, with Donatist outlaws assaulting Catholic pilgrims in the countryside, according to tradition.

As a result, Augustine came around to supporting military action against them.

Although Donatism was outlawed by the Roman authority in 405, the dispute raged on until 411.

Severe legal sanctions were used to put a stop to donoratism.

While the Donatist debate was in full force, a natural disaster hit the Roman Empire.

Rome was the symbolic capital of an empire that had dominated the known world for hundreds of years at the time.

The next year, Augustine began composing his greatest opus, The City of God Against the Pagans, on which he would spend the next 15 years working on.

Pelagianism, a religious movement that arose around the time of the collapse of Rome and advocated for a fundamental renewal of spiritual and physical discipline, gained traction in the church.

Incredulous by the apparent helplessness of human beings that Augustine’s speech appeared to suggest, Pelagius expressed his displeasure.

Using pure power of will, Pelagius maintained that human beings might choose to reach moral perfection — and not only that they could, but that they had a moral obligation to do so.

Christians can and should strive to be good, but they must also acknowledge their fallen nature and their reliance on God’s grace in their endeavors.

The influence of Pelagianism continued to grow, and Augustine spent his final years engaged in a long-distance argument with Julian of Eclanum, a brilliant and outspoken champion of the Pelagianism.

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Historically, Augustine associated the birth of sexual desire with the beginning of human disobedience, which he referred to as Adam and Eve’s original sin, which was passed down to all of humanity.

He was adamant that sexual desire was merely another of the five physical senses, and that the justice of God would not punish the entire human species for the disobedience of a single individual.

In light of Augustine’s contention that only God’s grace can drive human beings toward salvation, the question of how God chooses those who would be saved became essential.

Several French monastic groups responded to this argument with a form of uprising in the year 428.

As a reaction to letters from the monks, Augustine admitted that predestination was a difficult subject to discuss, but he refused to concede the argument.

The Vandals, another barbaric group from Europe, invaded North Africa in 429, bringing the region to its knees.

The Vandals attacked the city of Hippo, which occurred throughout August.

He insisted that no one come to see him, so that he might pray undisturbed.

With the fall of the old Roman Empire, Augustine’s world, which he had grown up in much as he despised it, was coming to an end in real life.

Works of Significant Importance More than 300 sermons, 500 letters, and several additional writings on a wide range of themes were written by Augustine, who was also an accomplished writer.

Augustine, conscious of the fact that he was leaving behind a significant and powerful body of work, started about arranging and rereading his writings at the end of his life, in hisRetractiones (Revisions) (Retractions, 427).

Augustine’s second great classic book, aside from the Confessions (written 397-401), isDe civitate DeiorThe City of God (written 413-427), a monumental investigation of the demise of pagan civilisation and the role of Christianity in history.

Augustine’s other notable works include the following, to name only a few examples.

St. Augustine

Anecdotal Information On November 13, 354 in the town of Thagaste, on what is now Algeria’s northern coast, Saint Augustine of Hippo was born. North Africa was a part of the Roman Empire, though it was regarded as something of a backwater because it was so far away from the imperial centers of authority. In the Roman empire, Augustine’s father, Patricius (or Patrick), was adecurio, or a minor official. Despite this, adecurio’s position was far from glamorous, as he was expected to act as a patron for his community and make up for any shortfalls in taxes collected from the surrounding area.

  1. Augustine had at least one brother, Navigius, and at least one sister, but little is known about his siblings.
  2. Augustine’s mother, Monica (also spelled Monnica), had been brought up as a Christian by her family.
  3. The example of his mother’s fervent faith had a powerful impact on young Augustine, and it was an influence that he carried with him throughout his life.
  4. In school, Augustine demonstrated early promise, and as a result, his parents scrimped and saved to provide their son with a good Roman education, in the hope of ensuring him a successful career.
  5. Augustine describes himself as a dissolute young man who was unrestrained by his parents, who were more concerned with his academic success than with his personal behavior.
  6. When Augustine was about 16 years old, his parents sent him to Carthage, the largest city in the region, to study at the university there.
  7. Augustine’s father died not long after he arrived in Carthage, leaving Augustine as the nominal head of the family.

During this time, he read the book that he believes inspired him to begin his spiritual journey: Cicero’s Hortensius, which he claims gave him the desire to seek truth in whatever form he might find it.

Attracted to Manichaeism by its clear dividing line between good and evil, its highly intellectual mythology, and its strict moral standards, Augustine became a follower.

Augustine went on to have a thriving career as a public speaker and teacher.

Even though Augustine’s time in Rome was short-lived, his abilities caught the attention of a Roman official, who recommended Augustine for the position of public orator for the imperial city of Milan.

The application of Neo-Platonic ideas to the interpretation of Christian scripture, presented with Ambrose’s famous eloquence, piqued Augustine’s interest.

After growing increasingly dissatisfied with Manichaeism, Augustine was persuaded to break with the Manichaees by Ambrose’s influence.

Meanwhile, Augustine’s professional life was thriving, and his prospects in the world looked promising.

In the fall of 386, he had a conversion experience that led him to sacrifice his professional ambitions and future marriage chances in order to devote his life to the service of God.

He was ultimately baptized by Bishop Ambrose on the feast of Easter in 387.

They were on their way back to Africa when the incident occurred.

In 389, Augustine returned to Thagaste, where he resided on his family’s land in a tiny, quasi-monastic community.

In 391, he traveled to the city of Hippo Regius, which is about 60 miles away from Thagaste, with the intention of establishing a monastery, but he ended up being conscripted into the priesthood by a Christian congregation in the city of Hippo Regius.

The following 35 years were devoted to preaching and celebrating Mass as well as mediating local issues and ministering to the members of his church.

During this time period, the Christian church in North Africa was divided into two warring groups, the Donatists and the Catholics.

Following the conclusion of the persecutions, the Catholic Church re-admitted those Christians who had publicly repented of having rejected their religion.

Furthermore, they refused to acknowledge any priests or bishops other than their own, claiming that the Catholic bishops had been appointed by traitors.

Augustine attempted negotiation with the Donatists at first, but they rejected his efforts, leading him to urge the use of force against them.

Augustine, the former rhetor, eloquently explained the Catholics’ cause, and Marcellinus ruled in their favor after hearing the arguments.

A defining declaration about the nature and purpose of the church, Augustine’s vision of Catholicism as a thriving institution that could flourish despite believers’ flaws was further developed from Augustine’s vision of Catholicism as an institution that could thrive despite the flaws of its members.

  1. Roman capital Rome, which had served as a symbol of an empire that had ruled the known world for hundreds of years, was sacked and destroyed by the troops of the Visigoths, a group of northern European barbarian tribes, in the year 410.
  2. In response, Augustine began composing his greatest masterwork, The City of God Against the Pagans, on which he toiled for 15 years and which is considered his best achievement.
  3. At around the same time that Rome was falling, a religious movement known as Pelagianism started to spread across the church, calling for a fundamental renewal of spiritual and physical discipline.
  4. Pelagius was appalled by the apparent helplessness of human beings that Augustine’s words appeared to suggest.
  5. Pelagius asserted that human beings may choose to reach moral perfection via pure power of will — and not only that they can, but that they must — and that this is the only way to achieve it.
  6. Christians can and should try to be good, but they must also acknowledge their fallen position and their reliance on God’s grace.
  7. Pelagianism, on the other hand, remained influential, and Augustine spent his final years engaged in a long-distance argument with Julian of Eclanum, a brilliant and outspoken champion of Pelagianism.

Augustine associated the birth of sexual desire with the beginning of human disobedience, which he said was the result of Adam and Eve’s original sin, which stained all of humanity.

He was adamant that sexual desire was merely another of the physical senses and that God’s justice would not punish the entire human race as a result of the disobedience of a single person.

In light of Augustine’s contention that only God’s grace could drive human beings toward salvation, the question of how God selected those who would be saved became essential.

Several French monastic groups were enraged by this allegation, and a type of uprising broke out in 428.

Despite the fact that he agreed that predestination was a tough subject, Augustine refused to concede the argument.

The Vandals, another barbarian tribe from Europe, invaded North Africa in 429, bringing the region under their control.

According to Augustine’s biographer, Possidius, he spent the last days of his life studying the penitential psalms that he had written on the walls of his apartment and sobbing over his sins, as well as praying for the forgiveness of others.

He died on August 28, 430, at the age of 75, and therefore did not survive to witness the Vandals’ invasion of Hippo, which occurred in 431.

Augustine had a tremendous impact on the world that followed him, the Christianized civilisation of Medieval Europe, and the world that followed him.

Many of these works have not yet been translated into English, despite the fact that a huge translation initiative is now ongoing.

The labor of Augustine and his companion and biographer Possidius, despite the fact that he never finished the assignment, provided future readers with a well-documented catalogue of Augustine’s writings.

Augustine’s other notable works include the following, to name a few examples: Psalms include narratives (Explanations of the Psalms), 392-422De doctrina Christiana (On Christian Doctrine), 396De trinitate (On the Trinity), 399-422De Genesi ad litteram (Literal Interpretation of Genesis), 401-415De doctrina Christiana (On Christian Doctrine), 401-415De Genesi ad litteram (Literal Interpretation of Genesis), 401-415De Genesi ad litteram (Literal Interpretation of Genesis), 401-415De Gene

Influence of Manichaeism

Anecdotal History Saint Augustine of Hippo was born on November 13, 354 in the town of Thagaste, on the northern coast of Africa, in what is now Algeria, to a family of four. North Africa was a part of the Roman Empire, though it was considered something of a backwater because it was so far away from the centers of imperial power. Augustine’s father, Patricius (or Patrick), was an adecurio, a low-ranking official in the Roman empire. The position was far from glamorous, however, because adecuriowas required to act as a patron for his community and to make up for any shortfalls in taxes collected from the surrounding region.

  • Augustine had at least one brother, Navigius, and at least one sister, but there is little information available about his siblings.
  • Augustine’s mother, Monica (sometimes spelled Monnica), had been brought up as a Christian.
  • The example of his mother’s fervent faith had a profound impact on young Augustine, and it was an influence that would remain with him throughout his life.
  • Augustine demonstrated early promise in school, and as a result, his parents scrimped and saved to provide their son with a good Roman education, in the hope of ensuring him a prosperous career.
  • Augustine describes himself as a dissolute young man who was unrestrained by his parents, who were more concerned with his academic success than with his personal behavior.
  • There he studied literature and poetry in preparation for a career as a rhetor, a professional public speaker and rhetorical educator.
  • In Carthage, he established a household with a concubine, who became the mother of his son, Adeodatus, who was born around 372.

Augustine also encountered Manichaeism in Carthage, which became the religion that dominated his life for the next decade.

After completing his studies, Augustine briefly returned to Thagaste to teach, but he soon left for Carthage, where teaching opportunities were more plentiful.

Encouraged by wealthy Manichee friends, he traveled to Rome in 383, where he hoped to advance his professional career.

In 384, Augustine relocated to Milan, where he was inspired by the preaching of Bishop Ambrose.

Augustine had been growing increasingly dissatisfied with Manichaeism, and Ambrose’s influence encouraged him to break with the Manichees.

Meanwhile, Augustine’s professional life was thriving, and his long-term prospects appeared promising.

In the fall of 386, he had a conversion experience that convinced him to give up his career and future marriage prospects in order to devote his life to God.

Bishop Ambrose ultimately baptized him on Easter Sunday in 387.

Augustine’s personal story, as told in the Confessions, comes to a close around the time he was 35 years old, but his life’s work was only getting started.

Augustine’s abilities, on the other hand, continued to gain attention.

In 395, he was appointed Bishop of Hippo.

He continued to write, and he became well-known throughout the Christian community for his involvement in a number of debates.

In the early 300s, the African church had undergone Imperial persecutions, and some Christians had openly forsaken their views in order to avoid torture and execution, while others had chosen martyrdom in the name of their faith.

The Donatists, on the other hand, argued that anybody who wanted to rejoin the church must be rebaptized.

By the 390s, the debate had escalated to the point of violence, with Donatist bandits assaulting Catholic pilgrims in the countryside.

The Roman government outlawed Donatism in 405, but the dispute persisted until 411, when hundreds of Donatist and Catholic bishops gathered in Carthage for a hearing before the imperial commissioner Marcellinus, who happened to be Augustine’s friend and a Catholic.

Donatism was repressed by the use of heavy legal sanctions.

While the Donatist debate was in full force, a natural disaster shook the Roman world.

Many people throughout the empire felt that the fall of Rome heralded the end of civilisation as they knew it.

In The City of God, Augustine pits the heavenly and immortal Jerusalem, the ultimate home of all Christians, against the transitory earthly authority represented by Rome, and in doing so, he articulates an altogether new Christian worldview.

Its creator, a British monk called Pelagius, had read Augustine’s petition to God in the Confessions, which said, “Grant what you command and command what you will” (10.29).

If human people are incapable of becoming good without the intervention of God, then what is the point of having free will?

Augustine, on the other hand, claimed that no human being could aspire to achieve anything close to moral perfection since the human will had been irreparably corrupted by original sin.

Pelagius was officially condemned and exiled in 416, according to Augustine’s persuasive argument.

Augustine and Julian had a disagreement about the nature of human sexuality, among other things.

Julian, on the other hand, could not embrace the concept of original sin.

In his arguments with the Pelagians, Augustine brought up yet another difficult topic: the doctrine of predestination.

Augustine believed that only a small number of individuals were saved, and that only God knew who was saved and who was not.

If one could perform heroic acts of self-denial and spiritual dedication, as the monks had done, and yet not know whether or not one was saved, then what was the purpose of even trying?

Predestination did not imply that human people might safely abandon their spiritual pursuits; steadfastness in faith was one of God’s gifts to human beings.

During the summer of 430, the Vandals laid siege to the city of Hippo, and Augustine fell ill during that month.

He insisted that no one come to see him, so that he might devote undisturbed time to prayer.

Augustine’s environment, the old Roman Empire that had educated him even as he despised it, was actually coming to an end.

Work of Importance Augustine was a prolific writer, having written more than 300 sermons, 500 letters, and several more writings on a wide range of themes throughout his lifetime.

Augustine, conscious of the fact that he was leaving behind a significant and powerful body of work, began about arranging and rereading his works at the end of his life, in hisRetractiones (Retractions, 427).

Augustine’s second great classic book, aside from the Confessions (written 397-401), is De civitate DeiorThe City of God (written 413-427), a mammoth analysis of the demise of pagan society and the significance of Christianity in history.

Influence of Platonism

Background Information about the Author On November 13, 354 at the village of Thagaste, on what is now Algeria’s northern coast, Saint Augustine of Hippo was born. He was the first Christian martyr to be martyred. North Africa was a component of the Roman Empire, however it was seen as something of a backwater since it was so far away from the imperial centers of authority. It is believed that Augustine’s father Patricius (or Patrick) was adecurio, or a low-ranking officer in the Roman empire.

  • As a result of this obligation, the family’s finances were likely put under continual strain, which may explain Augustine’s claims that his family was impoverished.
  • In addition to being a pagan, Patricius was also a follower of the Roman civic religion.
  • Patricius was just a lukewarm Christian, but he enabled Monica to raise the couple’s children as Christians, and he eventually committed to Christianity before his death in a car accident.
  • Patricius, on the other hand, had little impact on Augustine’s personality, and Patricius emerges in the Confessions as a remote and ambiguous figure.
  • He was sent to the adjacent town of Madaura for further studies, but due to a lack of funds, he was obliged to return home to Thagaste for a year, during which time his father attempted to save more money to cover the cost of tuition.
  • Augustine’s parents were more concerned with his academic performance than with his personal behavior.
  • He studied literature and poetry there in preparation for a future as a rhetor, a professional public speaker and rhetorical educator.
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In Carthage, he established a home with a concubine, who would later become the mother of his son, Adeodatus, who was born about 372.

He believes this book instilled in him the drive to pursue truth in whatever form he may find it.

Attracted to Manichaeism by its clear demarcation between good and evil, its highly intellectual mythology, and its severe moral standards, Augustine studied it for several years.

Augustine went on to have a thriving career as a public speaker and educator.

Despite the fact that Augustine’s time in Rome was unsatisfactory, his abilities grabbed the attention of a Roman official, who nominated Augustine for the job of public orator for the imperial city of Milan.

The application of Neo-Platonic ideas to the interpretation of Christian scripture, presented with Ambrose’s famous eloquence, piqued Augustine’s interest.

Throughout his life, Augustine had been growing more disillusioned with Manichaeism, and Ambrose’s influence led him to end his association with them.

Meanwhile, Augustine’s professional life was thriving, and his long-term prospects seemed promising.

In the fall of 386, he had a conversion experience that led him to sacrifice his professional ambitions and future marriage chances in order to devote his life entirely to the service of God.

He was ultimately baptized by Bishop Ambrose on Easter Sunday in 387.

They were on their way back to Africa when they were delayed.

After his exile from Rome, Augustine retreated to Thagaste, where he lived on his family’s farm in a tiny quasi-monastic community until his death in 389.

In 391, he traveled to the city of Hippo Regius, which is about 60 miles away from Thagaste, with the intention of establishing a monastery, but he ended up being conscripted into the priesthood by a Christian congregation in the city of Hippo Regius instead.

Over the following 35 years, he spent his time preaching, celebrating mass with his congregation, mediating local issues, and ministering to them.

As a result of this division, the Christian church in North Africa was split into two competing groups, the Donatists and the Catholics.

Following the conclusion of the persecutions, the Catholic Church re-admitted those Christians who had publicly repented of having rejected their Christian religion.

Furthermore, they refused to acknowledge any priests or bishops other than their own, claiming that the Catholic bishops had been anointed by traitors and hence were not legitimate.

Augustine attempted diplomacy with the Donatists at initially, but they rejected his efforts, leading him to advocate for the use of force against them in the long run.

Although Donatism was outlawed by the Roman authority in 405, the fight persisted until 411.

Donatism was stifled by the imposition of heavy legal sanctions.

A disaster shook the Roman world during the height of the Donatist conflict.

Rome was the symbolic capital of an empire that had dominated the known world for hundreds of years.

As a result, Augustine began composing his greatest masterwork, The City of God Against the Pagans, which he labored on for 15 years and is considered his best achievement.

At around the same time that Rome was falling, a religious movement known as Pelagianism started to spread across the church, calling for a fundamental renewal of spiritual and physical discipline.

Pelagius was appalled by what he perceived to be the apparent helplessness of human beings implied by Augustine’s words.

Pelagius maintained that human beings may choose to reach moral perfection through pure power of will — and not only that they can, but that they must — and that this is the only way for them to be happy.

Christians may and should try to be good, but they must also acknowledge their fallen position and their reliance on God’s grace in order to do so.

In any case, Pelagianism continued to have a significant influence, and Augustine spent his final years engaged in a long-distance argument with Julian of Eclanum, a brilliant and outspoken champion of Pelagianism.

Augustine associated the birth of sexual desire with the beginning of human disobedience, which he said was the result of Adam and Eve’s original sin, which blemished all of humanity.

He was adamant that sexual desire was merely another of the physical senses and that God’s justice would not punish the entire human race as a result of the disobedience of a single individual.

In light of Augustine’s contention that only God’s grace can drive human beings toward salvation, the question of how God selects those who would be saved became essential.

A form of uprising broke out among numerous French monastic communities in the year 428 as a result of this argument.

Augustine agreed that predestination was a tough topic in answer to letters from the monks, but he refused to concede the argument.

The Vandals, another barbarian tribe from Europe, invaded north Africa in 429, bringing the region under their control.

According to Augustine’s biographer, Possidius, he spent the last days of his life studying the penitential psalms that he had written on the walls of his apartment and lamenting over his sins, as well as praying for the conversion of others.

He died on August 28, 430, at the age of 75, and therefore did not survive to witness the Vandals’ invasion and conquest of Hippo in 431.

Augustine had a tremendous impact on the civilisation that succeeded it, the Christianized civilization of Medieval Europe, and he was a major figure in that development.

Many of these works have not yet been translated into English, despite the fact that a huge translation initiative is now under process in this country.

The labor of Augustine and his companion and biographer Possidius, despite the fact that he never completed this assignment, provided future readers with a well-documented list of Augustine’s writings.

Augustine was born in 397 and died in 427.

Conversion to Christianity

Background Information on the Author On November 13, 354 at the village of Thagaste, on what is now Algeria’s northern coast, Saint Augustine of Hippo was born. Saint Augustine of Hippo was the first Christian martyr to be beatified. Despite the fact that North Africa was a part of the Roman Empire, it was seen as somewhat of a backwater, located distant from the imperial centers of authority. In the Roman empire, Augustine’s father, Patricius (or Patrick), was adecurio, a subordinate officer.

  1. Because of this obligation, the family’s finances were likely put under continual strain, which may explain Augustine’s claims that his family was impoverished.
  2. His religion was that of the Romans’ civic religion, which he practiced as a pagan.
  3. Patricius was just a lukewarm Christian, but he enabled Monica to raise the couple’s children as Christians, and he eventually converted to Christianity before his death at the hands of his wife.
  4. For his part, Patricius had little impact on Augustine’s personality, and Patricius is depicted in the Confessions as a remote and unreliable guy.
  5. He was sent to the adjacent town of Madaura for further studies, but due to a shortage of funds, he was obliged to return home to Thagaste for a year, during which time his father attempted to save more money to cover the cost of his education.
  6. Augustine’s parents were more concerned with his academic performance than with his personal behavior.
  7. There, he studied literature and poetry in preparation for a future as a rhetor, a professional public speaker and instructor of rhetorical theory and techniques.

Adeodatus was born at Carthage in 372 and lived there with his concubine, who was also the mother of his son.

During this time, he also began to meditate.

Attracted to Manichaeism by its clear demarcation between good and evil, its highly intellectual mythology, and its severe moral standards, Augustine became a follower.

The young Augustine rose to prominence as an accomplished public speaker and educator.

Even though Augustine’s time at Rome was short-lived, his abilities grabbed the attention of a Roman official, who suggested him for the role of public orator for the imperial city of Milan.

Ambrose’s application of Neo-Platonic ideas to the interpretation of Christian scripture, presented with Ambrose’s famous eloquence, piqued Augustine’s interest.

Augustine had been growing more disenchanted with Manichaeism, and Ambrose’s influence prompted him to sever his ties with the Manichaees as well.

Meanwhile, Augustine’s professional life was thriving, and his long-term prospects were looking promising in the world beyond the monastery.

A conversion experience occurred in the fall of 386, which led him to give up his work and future marriage prospects in order to devote his life to God.

Finally, on Easter 387, Bishop Ambrose performed his baptism.

They were on their way back to Africa when they were delayed.

After his exile from Rome, Augustine went to Thagaste, where he resided on his family’s land as part of a small quasi-monastic community.

The year 391 saw him travel to the city of Hippo Regius, which is about 60 miles away from Thagaste, with the intention of setting up a monastery.

The year 395 saw him elevated to the position of bishop of Hippo.

The author continued to write, and as a result of his involvement in various debates, he became well-known across the Christian world.

African Christians have been subjected to Imperial persecutions from the early 300s.

Catholics re-admitted Christians who had publicly repented of having lost their religion once the persecutions came to an end after World War II.

On top of that, they refused to acknowledge any other priests or bishops other than their own, claiming that the Catholic bishops had been appointed by traitors.

First, Augustine attempted to negotiate with the Donatists, but they turned him down.

Hundreds of Donatist and Catholic bishops convened for a hearing in Carthage before the imperial commissioner Marcellinus, who happened to be Augustine’s friend and fellow Catholic.

After hearing Augustine, the former rhetor, make an articulate argument in behalf of the Catholics, Marcellinus comes to a favorable conclusion.

A fundamental declaration about the nature and purpose of the church, Augustine’s vision of Catholicism as a thriving institution that could thrive despite believers’ flaws was further developed from Augustine’s vision of Catholicism as an institution that could flourish despite the flaws of believers.

  1. Roman Empire, which had ruled the known world for hundreds of years, was looted and destroyed by the army of the Visigoths, a tribe of northern European barbarians, in the year 410.
  2. People throughout the empire were under the impression that the collapse of Rome signaled the end of civilisation as they had known it.
  3. In The City of God, Augustine pits the heavenly and immortal Jerusalem, the ultimate home of all Christians, against the transitory earthly authority represented by Rome, and in doing so, he articulates an altogether new Christian world view that is still in development today.
  4. Augustine’s prayer in the Confessions, “Grant what you command and command what you will,” had inspired its founding monk, a British monk named Pelagius (10.29).
  5. It would be pointless to have free will if human beings were incapable of doing good without God’s aid.
  6. As a result of his belief that the human will was forever polluted by original sin, Augustine maintained that no human being could ever aspire to achieve anything close to moral perfection.
  7. As he had done before, Augustine presented an argument that was successful: Pelagius was officially condemned and expelled from Rome in 416.

The nature of human sexuality was among the topics on which Augustine and Julian disagreed, among other things.

Original sin, on the other hand, Julian could not reconcile with.

Augustine brought up the subject of predestination in his disputes with the Pelagians, which was another tough topic for him to tackle.

Theologian Augustine believed that only a small number of individuals were saved, and that only God knew who had been saved and who had been lost.

After all, if one could perform heroic acts of self-denial and spiritual dedication, such as those performed by the monks, and yet not know whether or not one had been saved, what was the purpose of even trying?

Even if human beings were predestined, this did not imply that they may safely abandon their spiritual pursuits; rather, steadfastness in faith was one of the many gifts that God had given to them.

This occurred during the summer of 430, during which Augustine was ill.

He spent the latter days of his life studying the penitential psalms that he had written on the walls of his apartment and grieving over his transgressions, according to Augustine’s biographer Possidius.

He died on August 28, 430, at the age of 75, and therefore did not survive to witness the Vandals’ invasion of Hippo, which took place in 431.

Augustine had a tremendous impact on the world that followed him, the Christianized civilisation of Medieval Europe, and he was a major figure in that development.

Despite the fact that a huge translation initiative is now ongoing, many of these works have not been translated into English.

The labor of Augustine and his companion and biographer Possidius, despite the fact that he never finished the assignment, provided future readers with a well-documented collection of Augustine’s writings.

The Confessions are Augustine’s most well-known work.

Psalms provide narratives (Explanations of the Psalms), On Christian Doctrine, 392-422, 396De trinitate (On the Trinity), 399-422, De Genesi ad litteram (Literal Interpretation of Genesis), 401-415, 396-422, 396-422, 396-422, 396-422, 396-422, 396-422, 396-422, 396-422, 396-422, 396-422, 396-422, 396-422, 396-422, 396-422, 396-422, 396-422, 396-4

Theory of Knowledge

Contra academicos is one of Augustine’s early works, in which he takes on skepticism and sets the framework for the possibility of knowing. He accomplishes this by drawing attention to propositions that even the most skeptical person cannot dispute. For starters, exclusive disjunctive statements may be relied upon to be correct. For example, it is definite that there is only one universe or that there are several worlds. It is likewise unassailable that the world has a beginning and an end, whether or not both are true at the same time, or that one is true but not the other, or that neither is true at all.

  1. Only when the appearance of something is perceived as reality can error occur in a person’s judgment.
  2. In addition, the correctness of mathematical judgements such as “two plus two equals four” is beyond question.
  3. If there is no such thing as a person, then there can’t be any uncertainty or wrong.
  4. Because both are well-known to be true, one recognizes that he has grasped the situation.
  5. For example, mathematical and logical propositions have the unique property of being both eternally and necessarily true.
  6. However, because the human mind is malleable and transitory, cognitions of eternal truths and standards are acts that are beyond the inherent capabilities of the human intellect.
  7. A common belief among many Greek philosophers is that the ultimate goal of man is bliss or beatitude, and that such a state is the result of possessing wisdom.
  8. Wisdom, on the other hand, is defined as Christian wisdom in Augustine’s eyes.
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Creation from Nothing

Augustine’s Christian philosophy is founded on the premise that God created the universe out of nothing, which is one of the philosophical pillars. As a result, Augustine was hostile to the Neoplatonic concept of an universe that was created by God out of necessity. It is also necessary to reject the Greek concept of world formation, which is based on the paradigm of an artist creating an accomplished object from the resources at hand, in order to achieve “creation from nothing.” For a heavenly artisan to be able to work on such a model, prior and independent material must be available.

At first glance, Augustine’s hardline view on creation appears to have been tempered by his additional notion of seminal causes (De genesi ad litteram,VI, 6, 12).

Augustine’s adoption of this thesis was primarily motivated by issues of scripture interpretation, which he considered to be important.

According to Genesis, different types of things arose at different periods throughout the days of creation, which were sequentially ordered.

However, if one believes, as Augustine does, that all things were formed together from nothing but that certain things were created from nothing in a seminal state, to be brought into real formation later, the impression of contradiction is eliminated.

Time as Extension

As one of its pillars, Augustine’s Christian philosophy holds that God created the universe out of nothing by his own volition and will. The Neoplatonic concept of God creating the universe out of necessity was therefore challenged by Augustine. Furthermore, “creation from nothing” means that the Greek conception of world formation, which is based on the paradigm of an artist creating a finished object from resources at hand, is rejected. To construct such a model, a divine artisan must start with preexisting and independent materials.

  1. By developing his theory of seminal causes, Augustine appears to have softened his uncompromising stance on creation, at least at first glance (De genesi ad litteram,VI, 6, 12).
  2. Considering the implications of scripture interpretation, Augustine’s endorsement of this idea was primarily determined by these concerns.
  3. In Genesis, different types of things arose at different periods throughout the days of creation, which were separated by a gap of time.
  4. But if one believes, as Augustine does, that all things were formed together from nothing but that certain things were created from nothing in a seminal state before being brought into real creation, the impression of contradiction is eliminated.

Eternal Soul

The soul of a person is one of the things that comes into being over time. Augustine’s conception of the soul is firmly based in Platonic thought. According to him, it is a material that is different from and superior to the body, and that is connected to the body by a kind of vital awareness. The soul employs the body as an instrument in sensory experience, focusing more of its important attention on one organ than the others. Augustine asserts that, despite the fact that the soul is something that has come into being, it can never cease to exist.

For example, the soul is what it is because it is a part of a principle, life, that does not allow for the existence of anything else.

The emergence of the human soul is accompanied by a theological quandary.

The former viewpoint, when joined with the belief in original sin, leads to the conclusion that God would intentionally create something bad.

According to the latter viewpoint, Adam would have handed on to his successors a human soul that had been corrupted by his sin but had not been corrupted when God created it. Traducianism is the name given to the second point of view, and it was this point of view that Augustine was inclined.

Philosophy of History

The soul of a person is one of the things that come into being over time. A major Platonic influence may be found in Augustine’s conception of the human soul. The substance is different from and superior to the body, according to him, and it is connected to the body by a kind of vital attentiveness. As a means of increasing its essential focus on a particular organ, the soul employs the body as an instrument during sensory experience. While Augustine acknowledges that the soul is a creation, he asserts that it can never be destroyed or removed from the universe.

  • Example: The soul exists because it participates in a principle, life, that does not allow for the existence of anything other than what it shares.
  • The emergence of the human soul is fraught with theological quandary.
  • When this concept is linked with the belief in original sin, God is said to have intentionally created evil.
  • It is known as Traducianism, and it is the second stance to which Augustine was more or less attracted.

Further Reading on St. Augustine

One of the most widely used translations of Augustine’s works is Basic Writings of Saint Augustine, edited by Whitney J. Oates, which is one of the most widely used translations in the world (2 vols., 1948). Saint Augustine and His Influence through the Ages, by Henri I. Marrou (trans. 1957), is an excellent introduction that provides a summary of Augustine’s life and thinking, as well as concise translations from his writings, is a wonderful introduction. The biography Augustine of Hippo, written by Peter Brown in 1967, is a superb work that covers both the theological and practical elements of Augustine’s life and career.

  1. Bourke’s Augustine’s Quest for Wisdom: Life and Philosophy of the Bishop of Hippo (1945), Jacques Chabannes’ Saint Augustine (trans.
  2. The Christian Philosophy of Saint Augustine, by étienne Gilson, is written from a Thomistic perspective, yet it is still the best scholarly explanation of Augustine’s philosophy available today (trans.
  3. See also Herbert A.
  4. Augustine, which is available online (1963).
  5. H.

Saint Augustine — The Augustinians

Aurelius Augustine was born in 354 in Tagaste, Algeria, in North Africa, the son of Patricius, a non-believer, and his fervent Catholic wife, Monica. He was the son of Patricius and Monica, who were both devoted Catholics. Despite the fact that his mother enrolled him as a catechumen when he was a child, Augustine’s baptism was postponed until a later date in accordance with the prevalent norm. September had an inquisitive mind and a charming personality from an early age. He had set his sights on a career that would provide him with both wealth and fame, goals that were enthusiastically supported by his parents, who sought out opportunities to provide their son with the best education possible.

  1. A more significant spiritual trip that he undertook over an extended period of time in quest of inner peace and permanent contentment was suggested by his travels from city to city, which were prompted by numerous chances and difficulties.
  2. Bishop Ambrose of Milan performed his baptism when he was 33 years old.
  3. Alypius and Adeodatus were present during Augustine’s baptism, and the three of them headed off towards Augustine’s hometown, where they hoped to join other men who had had a similar fundamental conversion to the Christian religion.
  4. Augustine, Adeodatus, and several friends lived an intensive life of prayer, work, and companionship at Tagaste, where they shared their thoughts about Scripture and the Christian vocation with one another.
  5. Despite this, he was willing to accept God’s will, believing it to be for his own good and the good of those around him.
  6. When Augustine succeeded Valerius as bishop of Rome, he felt forced to relocate to the bishop’s residence in order not to interfere with the peace of the monastic community.
  7. As a result, from the time of his return to Tagaste until the time of his death, Augustine was adamant on living a monastic lifestyle in community.
  8. His pastoral responsibilities at Hippo were supplemented by his attendance at Church Council meetings all across North Africa.
  9. He traveled to Carthage, the metropolitan see, for talks with other bishops around thirty times throughout his nine-day tour.
  10. In the year 430, Augustine became unwell and was forced to retire to his bed.
  11. He died on August 28th, just as the Vandals were about to take control of the city of Hippo.

His body was initially buried at Hippo, but it was then transported to Sardinia for safekeeping before being transported to Pavia in Northern Italy, where it is presently interred in the Basilica of San Pietro in Ciel d’Oro.

Saint Augustine, Doctor, and Philosopher born

As a child, Aurelius Augustine was born in 354 in the Algerian city of Tagaste, in the country of North Africa. He was the son of Patricius, a nonbeliever, and Monica, his fervent Catholic mother. In line with local custom, Augustine’s baptism was postponed until later in life, despite the fact that his mother had enrolled him as a catechumen when he was a kid. September had an inquisitive mind and a charming personality from an early age. He had set his sights on a career that would provide him with both wealth and fame, goals that were enthusiastically supported by his parents, who looked for opportunities to provide their son with the best education they could afford.

  1. A more significant spiritual trip that he undertook over an extended period of time in quest of inner peace and permanent contentment was suggested by his travels from city to city, which were prompted by numerous possibilities and obstacles.
  2. Bishop Ambrose of Milan baptized him when he was 33 years old.
  3. Following his baptism, which he received alongside Adeodatus and Augustine’s own close friend, Alypius, Augustine headed off for his hometown, where he hoped to live a monastic lifestyle with other men who had also had a dramatic conversion to the religion.
  4. Augustine, Adeodatus, and several friends lived an intensive life of prayer, work, and companionship at Tagaste, where they shared their insights into Scripture and the Christian vocation with one another.
  5. Despite this, he was willing to accept God’s plan, believing it to be for his own good and the good of the people of Hippo.
  6. When Augustine succeeded Valerius as bishop of Rome, he felt forced to relocate to the bishop’s residence in order not to interfere with the peace of the monastic community.
  7. Since his return to Tagaste, Augustine has steadfastly chosen a monastic way of life in community, which he has maintained until his death.
  8. His pastoral responsibilities at Hippo were supplemented by his attendance at Church Council meetings all across North Africa.
  9. He traveled to Carthage, the metropolitan see, for talks with other bishops around thirty times during his nine-day stay there.
  10. Augustine became unwell in the year 430 and was forced to go to his bed.
  11. During the Vandals’ siege of Hippo on August 28th, he succumbed to his injuries.

In Hippo, his body was laid to rest; however, it was then transported to Sardinia for safekeeping before being transported to Pavia in Northern Italy, where it is presently interred in the Basilica of San Pietro in Ciel d’Oro.

Saint Augustine, Doctor, and Philosopher born

As a child, Aurelius Augustine was born in 354 in the Algerian city of Tagaste, in the country of North Africa. He was the son of Patricius, a non-believer, and Monica, his devoted Catholic wife. Despite the fact that his mother had enrolled him as a catechumen when he was a child, Augustine’s baptism was postponed until a later date in accordance with the prevalent norm. September had an inquisitive mind and a charming personality from an early age. He had set his sights on a career that would provide him with both wealth and fame, goals that were enthusiastically supported by his parents, who looked for opportunities to provide their son with the best education possible.

  1. A more significant spiritual trip that he undertook over an extended period of time in quest of inner peace and long-lasting contentment was suggested by his travels from city to city, which were prompted by a variety of chances and difficulties.
  2. He was baptized by Bishop Ambrose of Milan when he was 33 years old.
  3. Following his baptism, which he received alongside Adeodatus and Augustine’s own personal friend, Alypius, Augustine headed off for his hometown, where he hoped to live a monastic lifestyle with other men who had also had a dramatic conversion to the religion.
  4. Augustine, Adeodatus, and several friends lived an intensive life of prayer, work, and companionship at Tagaste, where they shared their insights into Scripture and the Christian vocation with one other.
  5. Nevertheless, he was willing to accept what he considered to be God’s intention for him.
  6. When Augustine succeeded Valerius as bishop of Rome, he felt forced to relocate to the bishop’s residence in order not to interfere with the peace of the monastic community.
  7. As a result, from the moment of his return to Tagaste until his death, Augustine was adamant on living a monastic lifestyle in community.
  8. At addition to his pastoral responsibilities in Hippo, he traveled to church councils throughout the area of North Africa — forty to fifty times throughout the length of his 35-year tenure as bishop.
  9. However, even these extended excursions, which Augustine found to be physically taxing, were little in compared to the enormous amount of writings and sermons that he produced: more than two hundred books and almost a thousand sermons, letters, and other publications.
  10. His days and nights were spent praying the penitential psalms, which he had scrawled on the wall of his chamber after requesting that they be done so.

He perished on August 28th, just as the Vandals were about to take over the city of Hippo. His remains was initially buried at Hippo, but it was then moved to Sardinia for safekeeping, and finally to Pavia in Northern Italy, where it is presently interred in the Basilica of San Pietro in Ciel d’Oro.

Reference:

Aurelius Augustine was born in 354 in Tagaste, Algeria, in North Africa, the son of Patricius, a non-believer, and his ardent Catholic wife, Monica. Despite the fact that his mother enrolled him as a catechumen when he was a child, Augustine’s baptism was postponed until a later date in accordance with local custom. Augustine possessed an inquisitive mind and an attractive personality from an early age, and he set his sights on a career that would bring him both wealth and fame, goals that were enthusiastically supported by his parents, who sought out opportunities to provide their son with the best education possible.

His voyage from city to city, which was prompted by a variety of possibilities and difficulties, was symptomatic of a more significant spiritual journey that he undertook over an extended period of time in pursuit of inner peace and permanent contentment.

Bishop Ambrose of Milan baptized him when he was 33 years old, at the age of 33.

Following his baptism, which he shared with Adeodatus and Augustine’s own close friend, Alypius, Augustine headed off for his hometown, where he hoped to live a monastic lifestyle alongside other men who had also had a dramatic conversion to the religion.

Augustine, Adeodatus, and several colleagues lived an intensive life of prayer, work, and companionship at Tagaste, where they shared their insights into Scripture and the Christian vocation.

In Hippo, he also formed a monastic community, which he directed while supporting the bishop, Valerius.

As a result, from the moment of his return to Tagaste until his death, Augustine was committed to living a monastic lifestyle in community.

At addition to his pastoral responsibilities in Hippo, he traveled to church councils throughout the area of North Africa — forty to fifty times throughout the course of the 35 years he served as bishop.

However, even these extended excursions, which Augustine found to be physically taxing, were little in compared to the enormous amount of writings and sermons that he produced: almost two hundred books and nearly a thousand sermons, letters, and other works.

His days and nights were spent praying the penitential psalms, which he had requested to be inscribed on the wall of his chamber.

His remains was initially laid to rest at Hippo, but it was then transported to Sardinia for safekeeping before being transported to Pavia in Northern Italy, where it is presently interred in the Basilica of San Pietro in Ciel d’Oro.

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