Where Is Saint Malo

Saint-Malo

Saint-Malo is a seaport located in the Ille-et-Vilaine département in the Brittany region of northwestern France. It is located on the right bank of the estuary of theRance River, on the English Channel, and on the English Channel. The ancient walled city is located on a granite islet that is connected to the mainland by an ancient causeway and an avenue that spans the inner harbour. Saint-Malo Fortress is located in Brittany, France. Photograph courtesy of Stefan Ataman/Shutterstock.com Saint-Malo was named after Maclou, or Malo, a Welsh monk who escaped to Brittany in the 6th century, establishing his headquarters on the island, and who is believed to have been the first bishop of Aleth.

A significant population on the island did not begin to appear until the 8th century, when people from the surrounding area sought sanctuary there to avoid being attacked by the Normans.

St.

The town was destroyed during World War II to the extent of three-quarters of its original size, but it has been rebuilt.

  1. The cathedral of Saint-Vincent, which dates from the 12th to the 17th centuries, was devastated during World War II but has since been repaired.
  2. Ferries transporting both freight and passengers connect Saint-Malo with England, Ireland, and the Channel Islands.
  3. The construction of the world’s first large-scale tidal power plant, which used flood and ebb tides to create energy in Saint-Malo, France, was finished in 1967.
  4. The most recent revision and update to this article was made by Maren Goldberg.

A guide to Saint Malo

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Saint Malo – historic port city

Parking: There is lots of paid parking available both off-street and on-street, as detailed on this page. The short-stay car parks are shown by blue P markers on the map, whereas the long-stay car parks are indicated by green P markers. Except on Sundays and public holidays, there is no free parking available in the vicinity of the old city.

A bit of history

Saint Malo is a city in France that has been inhabited since prehistoric times and is situated on a rocky outcrop in a naturally defensive location at the mouth of the River Rance. The name of today’s city comes from a amonk from Llancarfan Abbey in Wales, by the name of Maclovius, who was a follower and fellow traveler of Saint Brendan and was buried there. Maclovius was one of a large number of Celts who crossed the English Channel to Brittany – then known as Armorica – during the turbulent periods of the late Roman era in the United Kingdom.

As one of the most strategically positioned cities on the French coast, it is also known since “The Last Main Channel Port Before the Tip of Brittany,” as it was here that all commerce ships from the North Sea and the English Channel passed through on their route south.

However, St Malo was also noted for two maritime specialties. This is the harbour of Saint Malo, with the castle and tall ship the Etoile du Roy in the foreground.

Corsairs and explorers

While it gained notoriety as a haven for pirates, known as corsairs, it also rose to prominence as France’s premier port for voyages of exploration to the New World. At a period when piracy was widely recognized as a way of life on the high seas, the corsairs of St. Malo were properly dreaded by commerce ships sailing in the English or Dutch flags. So, in the same way that Queen Elizabeth encouraged Sir Francis Drake to raid and plunder Spanish ships, French Kings were more than willing to do the same for the corsairs of Saint Malo, many of whom rose to prominence as a result of the spoils of piracy.

  • Malo’s most famous seafarer, not a corsair.
  • The second journey took Cartier up the Saint Lawrence river to a place where a hill came up on the north side of the river, where he set up his base for the night.
  • Cartier is buried in the cathedral in Saint Malo, and now, in the old town, there is a museum devoted to the discovery of Quebec, la Maison du Québec, which is dedicated to Cartier’s voyage.
  • St Malo’s defensive walls were, however, inadequate to keep the city safe from bombing during the Second World War, which was carried out by both German and Allied forces.
  • Despite the fact that the old city center was not rebuilt exactly as it had been before, it was built in the same manner and in the same style as it had been before, with no inappropriate modern developments to alter its skyline.

Touristattractions – ten things to see and do

Saint Malo – the beach at low tide, the walls, and the historic center.

  • Saint Malo’s beaches are a popular tourist destination. Aside from the medieval center, the magnificent sandy beaches and ramparts of Saint Malo are the city’s most popular tourist attractions. A stroll around the walls of Saint Malo, which is around 2 kilometers in length, is one of the great urban walks in all of France. Free admission, and the elevated walkways at the top of the ramparts provide spectacular views of the surrounding beaches, the sea, an estuary, and the harbour. At each city gate and near the castle, there are steps leading up to the ramparts. On your trip around the walls, make a pit stop at the Maison du Québec, which tells the tale of St Malo’s involvement in the establishment of Canada
  • And the Château de la Citadelle. The historical museum of St. Malo is located in the ducal and royal castle of the city, which is located at the northeastern point of the old town. It’s worth it to climb up to the top of the great keep (le grand dongeon), where you’ll get some of the greatest panoramic views of the city and coastline. It is not fully traffic-free in the ancient center of Saint Malo because it is a bustling city with citizens, stores, and services to offer. The forts, on the other hand, are only accessible through the tiny cobblestone streets, which have a decent assortment of small stores, cafés, and restaurants
  • And the narrow cobbled streets. The city of Saint Malo includes a lot of interesting sites and attractions that are not located in the historic center. The island forts of the 18th century, which are part of the national Vauban UNESCO World Heritage Site, are among the most notable. When the tide is out, you may walk to theFort du Grand Bé and theFort National
  • Otherwise, you’ll have to take a boat. Trips on the water: When the tide is out, the inshore forts are among the preferred locations for the popular boat tours that depart from Saint Malo when the tide is in. Enjoy a variety of pleasure cruise choices, including mini-excursions around Saint Malo, longer cruises along the coast, or even a simple journey over the mouth of River Rance and into the resort of Dinard on the other side. Excursions are also available up the river, past the remarkable Rance tidal power dam, and beyond to the charming tiny town of Dinan
  • TheEtoile du Roy is one such destination. One of Saint Malo’s other major attractions is the Cathedral, which offers a more historical experience. As long as it is in port, the Etoile du Roy, France’s second-largest replica tall ship, will be available for tours. She spends the most of the year docked at the harbor, near to the tourist information center. The Etoile was first constructed as the Grand Turk for the British ITV series Hornblower, and it has since appeared in a number of films and television programs, including Tour Solidor, among others. The Tour Solidor, a beautiful 14th-century keep that currently houses the Museum of Saint Malo and its surroundings, as well as the Great Aquarium, is a short distance away from the old town. Finally, but certainly not least, is the Great Aquarium, which is the second most popular tourist destination in Brittany after the Loire Valley. It is one of the largest aquariums in France, with a total capacity of 2.5 million litres and 600 species. It is also regarded to be one of the six greatest aquariums in the world. Save time by making your reservation online
  • Interesting fact: the tidal power plant on the Rance, which was built in 1966 and had a production capacity of 240 Mw, was the world’s first and, for over 50 years, the world’s most powerful tidal power station. The Rance estuary has the highest tidal range in France, with an average tidal range of 8 metres and a maximum tidal range of 13.5 metres during spring tides.

In the area

Fort la Latte is a fort located near Cap Fréhel. The shore of Brittany is the most popular tourist destination in the area. East and west of Saint Malo, the Emerald Coastoffers a sequence of little resorts with lovely sandy beaches separated by long stretches of rocky shoreline to the east and west of the city. LeMont Saint Michel, a magnificent medieval city built on a rock connected to the mainland by a causeway, is located at the eastern extremity of the Emerald Coast, approximately 50 kilometers from Saint Malo.

  • Cap Fréhel, located at the western extremity of the Emerald coast, is one of Brittany’s most beautiful natural areas.
  • Fort la Latte is France’s analogue of Tintagel Castle in Cornwall, however it is far less of a ruin than Tintagel.
  • It is in stark contrast to Dinan, a historic tiny town with an amazing medieval castle that is worth seeing.
  • The castle and park ofBourbansais, located 20 kilometers southeast of Dinan, are well worth a visit, especially for families.

A significant portion of the Bourbansais Zoo’s budget is dedicated to programs for the conservation and reproduction of endangered animals.

Accommodation

Click here for a selection of hotels in Saint Malo at the most competitive online prices, as well as the About-France.com hotel selection for Saint Malo and the surrounding area. Because they are both prominent coastal towns, both Saint Malo and Dinard have a large selection of hotels, many of which are located right on the beach. Two four-star hotels and numerous well-rated two-star hotels may be found in the historic center of SaintMalo, as can be found in the rest of the city as well. Afterwards, there are several other hotels of all grades located along and behind the seashore in the eastern part of the medieval city, which faces Saint Malo’s main beach, the Grande Plage du Sillon.

Outside of Saint Malo, cities and villages along the Brittany coast provide a variety of lodging options; another common option in Brittany is to rent a gite, which is a small vacation home on its own grounds.

Saint Malo is located on the northwest coast of France, in the province of Brittany.

Access:

  • Using the air Dinard and Rennes are the closest airports. see Take a flight to France
  • By trainFrom Paris, Saint Malo may be reached in less than three hours by direct TGV (high-speed train) service. Trainline.com has schedules and online tickets
  • For further information, see Trainline.com. Traveling by car: Saint Malo is a little more than 3 hours’ drive from Cherbourg, and it’s approximately 5 hours’ trip from Calais, if you take the road through Le Havre and Caen along the way. It is four and a half hours by car from Paris, via Rennes (A 11) or Caen (A 10)
  • It is accessible by train from Paris. By ferry: There is direct access to Saint Malo by ferry from the Channel Islands, and during the summer season, there is one trip per day provided by Brittany Ferries from Portsmouth.

Unless otherwise noted, all content on About-France.com is protected by copyright until 2021. In addition, About-France.com has formed affiliate relationships with a number of travel service providers, and it is possible that it will get a commission on sales produced by visitors who click over to their websites from this one. This has no impact on the pricing of anything. Photo at the top of the page: The historic city of St Malo, as seen from the sea The following are the most important tourism facts of St Malo: Region:Brittany Cities in the vicinity include Dinard and Rennes.

The population is 44,600 people.

Attractions in the surrounding area include Mont Saint Michel, Dinard, Dinan, and the north Brittany coast.

Saint Malo hotels

Alternatively, the About-France.com option Hotels to suit all budgets and requirements Oceania’s top-rated four-star hotel is conveniently located near the major beach (Plabe du Sillon). Seaviews. Parking is available on-site (charge). ★★★★GoldenTulip A well-rated four-star hotel located in the heart of Saint Malo’s historic center. There is a fitness center. Parking is available on-site (charge) The Ibis St Malo Plage is a seafront hotel that is just a few minutes’ walk from the château. The Ibis quality range is at the top of the scale.

  1. A 17th-century manor house hotel, Manoirdu Cunningham, is located a minute from the beach, next to the harbor, and close to the Tour Solidor.
  2. ‘Hotelle Croiseur’ is an abbreviation for Hotelle Croiseur.
  3. Everything is within walking distance.
  4. F1 Saint Malo is a first-class flight.
  5. Mont Saint Michel illuminated at night About-France.com is protected by intellectual property rights.

From 2003 through 2021 Ibex73’s photos of the Port of St Malo and the Etoile du Roy are used under a Creative Commons license. GLM35’s Fort la Latte is a blend of espresso and latte art. Mont Saint Michel illuminated at night Benh Lieu Song captured this image.

Saint-Malo

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Intra muros

St Malo is divided into numerous areas, the most popular of which being intra muros, which translates as ‘inside the walls.’ There is an eclectic combination of pleasant hotels, restaurants to suit all tastes, and stores by the dozen in the tall granite buildings, the most of which have been renovated after having been destroyed during World War II. Take a tour of the city on the miniature train to acquire your bearings, or go for a refreshing walk around the fortifications. This museum has all you need to know about the history of the town and also contains several amazing marine artifacts, such as a ship’s prow, that are worth seeing.

Where it all began

It is primarily known as the birthplace of privateers, who established themselves in the St Servan area (but to see how they lived, travel back intra muros to the Hôtel d’Asfeld). St Malo is also noted for being a popular destination for tourists. St Malo was created on the site of the ancient Roman city of Alet by the Welsh monk St Maclou, who constructed a church on the site of the original city. The Tour Solidor, built in 14th century and now housing the Museum of Cape Horners, is the major reason to visit this region, aside from the spectacular views back over the citadel from the top of the hill.

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Shark attack

The Grand Aquarium, located south of St Servan, is home to 600 kinds of fish from cold and warm environments all over the world – including a shark tank full of sharks.

Islands

Two small islands are located just across the water from the ancient town and may be accessed at low tide (follow the warnings or you’ll get stranded!). The Fort National, erected by Vauban, stands on one side, while the mausoleum of Chateaubriand, a writer and politician who was born in St Malo in 1768, is on the other.

The Canada connection

From the ancient town all the way to the area of Rothéneuf, long stretches of sandy beach stretch eastward. The old home of one of St Malo’s most famous sons, Jacques Cartier, who discovered Canada, can be seen here; the Manoir de Limolou, built in the 15th century, now contains a wonderful museum dedicated to the explorer and his discoveries. The first immigrants to arrive in the Falkland Islands came from the French province of St Malo.

Main points of interest

  • The ramparts are an old city enclosure made up of towers dating from the 14th to 15th centuries, curtain walls dating from the 17th and 18th centuries, and bastions dating from the 17th and 18th centuries. There are four towers in the castle: the great keep (built in 1424), the Générale tower (built in 1475), Quic-en-Groigne tower (built in 1498–1501), and the Dames et des Moulins tower (built in 16th century). Fort National, constructed by Vauban and Garangeau in 1689
  • Petit Bé Fort (described by Vauban as “the nicest and most magnificent of all our forts”), built by Vauban and Garangeau in 1695
  • And Fort Royal, built by Vauban and Garangeau in 1689. Saint-Cathedral
  • Vincent’s Saint-Basilica
  • Vincent’s The Solidor tower, built in the 16th century and consisting of three connected towers
  • The fortified city of Alet, built in the 18th century
  • The churches of Sainte-Croix and Saint-Ideuc

Informationbookings

Take a boat to the Corsair City and explore the area! Every day of the year, Brittany Ferries provides direct sailings between Portsmouth and Saint-Malo. Saint-Malo also has the benefit of having a direct high-speed train connection to Paris (which takes around 2 hours 15 minutes), and you can travel to Paris on the Eurostar in 2 hours 16 minutes from London. It takes around 55 minutes to drive from Rennes using the TERregional transportation network.

You may take advantage of low-cost flights to Dinard airport, which is located 13 kilometers from Saint-Malo. There are direct flights to Dinard airport from London Stansted airport, if you prefer that option.

Travelling in and around Saint-Malo

The most convenient method to see the sights in Saint-Malo is to park your car on the outside of the city. A day ticket to the Paul Féval park and ride site gives you to five seats on the shuttle that transports you to the historic center of the city for the day. All of the Emerald Coast may also be reached by bus using the MAT’s transportation network. For those with a strong sense of adventure, theCompagnie Corsaireboats departing from Saint Malo for Cancale, Saint Cast-le-Guildo, and Dinan are a good choice.

Saint-Malo, France: Where ‘All The Light We Cannot See’ Comes Alive

Saint-Malo is a city on the coast of Brittany, France, that is famous for being the former home of the Corsairs and for having a wide tidal range. There is a walled ancient portion of the city called Intra Muros, which is within the city walls and is stuffed with of historical attractions and evocative alleyways. The Pulitzer Prize-winning novelAll the Light We Cannot Seeby Anthony Doerr, which is set primarily within the walls of this ancient city, makes full use of the setting, which appears to have remained still in time.

She is followed by Werner, a German kid of similar age who has had similarly harrowing wartime experiences, which are juxtaposed against those of Marie- Laure’s.

Visiting, on the other hand, is much more rewarding since you can walk in Marie-shoes Laure’s and experience the sights and sounds she did through touch, sound, smell, and even taste.

Malo’s If you are still reading, I will make every effort not to give anything away as I describe these unique Saint-Malo attractions.

4 Rue Vauborel

This is the address of the home where Marie-Laure and her father have taken refuge with Marie-reclusive Laure’s great-uncle Etienne LeBlanc and his housekeeper Madame Manec, who have taken in Marie-Laure and her father as guests. It should be easy to locate because it is six stories tall with an impressive attic. Located on the northwestern edge of the walled city, between the Bastion Saint-Philipe and the lengthy route out to the lighthouse Phare Mole des Noires, the tiny Rue Vauborel is a popular destination for tourists.

While the tall buildings are distinctive and typical of Saint-Intra Malo’s Muros, you can clearly see where the architect drew his inspiration from them.

Pro Tip: Did you know that in medieval times, the wealthiest inhabitants resided in the center of walled Saint-Malo, but today, everyone wants to live in a property with a view of the sea or the mountains? Google Maps is a mapping application.

Entrance To The Beach

Located a few minutes’ walk from Rue Vauborel is the Poterne d’Estrees, the gate that leads from the road past the walls and down to the beach. Marie-Laure follows Madame Manec’s directions, and for the first time, she is able to feel the ocean, the shore, the roar of the waves, and the fragrance of the sea for herself. She explores the tidal pools with her hands and gathers shells, which her Uncle Etienne explains to her in further detail. For example, in the chapter “The Rounds,” Marie-route Laure’s from the home to the beach is described as follows: “Twenty-two paces to the intersection of The Rue d’Estrees.” It’s another forty yards to the little gate.

Google Maps is a mapping application.

The Island Of Grand Be

In order to be near to the Island of Grand Be, Marie-Laure and Madame Manec choose a spot on the beach that is close to the island during low tide. Grand Be is one of two tidal islands that are exposed and accessible at low tide. The Grand Be is home to the grave of Saint-Malo-born novelist Victor Hugo. Francois-Auguste-Rene de Chateaubriand was a French nobleman who lived in the town of Chateaubriand. Do stroll out to the island during low tide, but be sure to return in plenty of time because the tidal range here is about 40 feet, and the water flows in quickly.

Fort National On The Island Of Petit Be

While you are touring the two tidal islands at low tide, make arrangements to take a tour of the Fort National, which was both in the novel and in real life a jail during the German control of the island. According to reports, the Germans imprisoned 380 villagers for six days in August 1944 and denied them access to food. This attraction is only accessible as part of a guided tour, and the historical lesson is a good complement to your retracing of Marie-footsteps Laure’s around Saint-Malo. Pro tip: Time your visit to coincide with low tide to get the most out of it.

Cathedral Of Saint-Malo

“For the entirety of Marie-four Laure’s years at Saint-Malo, the bells of St. Vincent’s have marked the hours,” starts the chapter headed “In the Attic.” “However, the bells have now stopped ringing.” This is the case since the Cathedral of Saint-Malo is located within the Parish of Saint Vincent within Intra Muros and is, in reality, the church of Saint Vincent. The spire of the church, which dates back to the 1100s, was attacked and destroyed during World War II, causing the bells to go silent.

Google Maps is a mapping application.

The Locked Grotto

Located directly within the ramparts (and whose key Marie-Laure was given by Crazy Hubert Bazin), this secret grotto teeming with snails is truly a fantastic location to visit. It is genuinely a hidden grotto that is difficult to locate. It is located only behind the currentHotel Les Chiens du Guet, which translates asHotel The Watchdogs, and adjacent to a bigger red door, which is secured by a metal gate, that the modest entry to the grotto may be found. The Bastion de la Hollande, which was erected in the late 1600s on the same site, was guarded by 24 English Mastiffs, who were set loose in the old town each night and whose kennel was in the grotto.

The Bastion de la Hollande was demolished in the early 1900s. Tips from the locals: Climb up to the ramparts from here to read the historical monument and observe the canons that were left over from the Bastion. Google Maps is a mapping application.

The Bakery

There are 22 steps down the Rue Vauborel to the left. Then turn right to find sixteen storm drains on your right. Take the first left into rue Robert Surcouf. “There are nine more drains to the bakery,” says the plumber. Although it appears to be uncomplicated, getting about in the actual Saint-Malo is not that simple. Trying to locate the bakery that plays such a significant role in All the Light We Cannot Seeis difficult without a house number or an actual boulangerie still in operation in its original location.

That’s what fiction is all about.

Google Maps is a mapping application.

Place Chateaubriand

St. Malo’s largest square, located directly outside the main entrance to the walled city, is mentioned numerous times throughout the novel, whether it is when Marie-Laure and her father arrive, when they sit and watch the Germans drive in, as the location where posters calling for the surrender of all firearms are displayed on the ancient trees, or as part of Madame Manec’s daily route around the neighborhood.

The area, which is ideal for people-watching, is also quite spectacular, thanks to the presence of theChateau de Saint-Malot, which towers over it, and the charmingHotel Chateaubriand, which sits to one side.

“As the little procession comes to a grinding halt on the circular gravel road in front of the soaring lichen-streaked walls of the Chateau de Saint-Malo, the sun shines off the hood decorations and chrome fittings.” As a pro tip, climb to the top of the castle’s tower for spectacular views across the roofs of the city.

The Hotel Of Bees

Werner has been surviving under the wreckage of his shelter, the Hotel of Bees, for four days when he first hears the radio message from Marie-Laure, which he interprets as a sign that he is hallucinating. There is no such thing as the Hotel of Bees in Saint-Malo, despite the fact that it was characterized as having bright-blue shutters and selling ice cream in its cafe. But, as previously said, it was located on Rue de la Crosse, as was the Hotel Porte St Pierre, which has a café just across the street that sells, among other things, ice cream.

Pro Tip: If you’re searching for a somewhere to stay, the hotel is a straightforward and reasonably priced alternative.

I hope you have a wonderful time following along Marie-footsteps Laure’s in Saint-Malo, reliving this magnificent novel in an equally amazing place. Are you planning to stay the night? Here are some suggestions for how to spend a beautiful day in Saint-Malo, according to me.

To see and do in Saint-Malo (Brittany) and nearby

The historic walled town of St-Malois, founded by the Welsh monk Mac Low and defended by its fortifications, the oldest of which dates back to the XIIth century, is a popular tourist destination. Discover amazing historical figures such as Chateaubriand, Surcouf, Jacques Cartier and Anne of Brittany, and follow in their footsteps. Visit the castle museum, which was built by the Dukes of Brittany in the XVth century, as well as the hotel Asfeld and the cathedral, before strolling along the beach to see the Fort National and the tiny islands of Grand Bé and Petit Bé, which are only accessible at low tide and are only accessible at low tide.

St.

Enjoy panoramic views of the Solidor harbour, the Rance estuary and its tidal energy plant, Dinard and the historic walled town from this lovely stroll!

Solidor Tower, originally constructed to control the town of St Malo in the XIVth century and later converted into a prison, now serves as the International Museum of the Cap Horn Long-Course, which was established in honor of the sailors of Saint-Malo, who were the first French explorers to cross the treacherous Cap Horn at the end of the XVIIth century.

  1. Price: 6 €Phone: +33 (0)2.99.40.71.58Phone: +33 (0)2.99.40.71.58Phone: +33 (0)2.99.40.71.58 In 1534, Jacques Cartier, a native of St.
  2. Laurent River, which is the only remaining remnant of the manor’s legendary owner, Jacques Cartier.
  3. Father Fourré began carving the rock in the nineteenth century, eventually constructing a massive naive-style sculpture.
  4. Toll-free number: 33 (0)2.99.56.23.95

HYDRO-ELECTRIC DAM AT THE RANCE ESTUARY

The plant, which was constructed between 1961 and 1966, connects the towns of Dinard and St Malo via land. It produces 600,000,000 kWh each year, despite the fact that it is located in an area with some of the highest tides on the planet (14ft tide range). There is no charge for entering the dam from the Dinard side of the bridge. The aquarium is home to one of the world’s most impressive collections of sharks and fish from oceans and seas all over the world. Among the attractions are the 360-degree shark ring aquarium and the Nautibus ride.

Aquarium Passes are available at the registration desk for a fee.

Over one hundred hectares are dedicated to the 27-hole domain, which adjoins the Mesnil forest (hunting grounds of Robert Surcouf, the legendary privateer (1773-1827), whose flag can be seen from the greens.) Phone: +44 (0)2.99.58.96.69 Golf Passes are available at the registration desk for a fee.

A sailing school located near the Thermes Marins that specializes in water sports like as windsurfing, sand sailing, catamaran sailing, surfing, and other activities. Contact number: +33 (0)2.99.40.07.47 Rate: Ask for a Surf School Pass at the front desk when you arrive.

THE BEACHES OF SAINT-MALO

The plant, which was constructed between 1961 and 1966, connects Dinard and St Malo via land. The facility generates 600,000,000 kWh per year, thanks to some of the world’s highest tides (tidal range of 14ft). The dam is accessible from the Dinard side of the bridge at no charge. There are sharks and fish from every ocean and sea in the globe here, making it one of the best collections on the planet. Both the shark ring aquarium and the Nautibus ride are quite unique. Phone: +33 (0)2.9921.19.00 (international).

The Saint-Malo Golf Resort ***, located on the Emerald Coast 15 minutes from Saint-Malo, is a must-see.

02.99.58.96.69 (Telephone) To obtain a Golf Pass, please inquire at the front desk.

Toll-free number: +44 (0)2.99-40-0747 Obtain a Surf School Pass at the front desk for the appropriate rate.

GRAND BÉ AND PETIT BÉ ISLANDS

Located at the entrance to the Rance estuary and under Saint-walls, Malo’s The Grand Bé is a small deserted island with a tidal peninsula where, at low tide, you may visit the burial of Chateaubriand, the great writer who was born in Saint-Malo. Le Petit Bé, a minor fortress erected by Vauban in the 17th century to defend the town, can be found close by as well. Depending on the tides and weather conditions, the beach may be open. Contact number: +33 (0)6.08.27.51.20 Price: 6 euros Built by the military architect Vauban to guard the port of Saint Malo in 1689, this ancient structure is still standing today.

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Walking up to the Fort National, which has granite walls cut into the rock and is accessible by foot at low tide, will provide you with an opportunity to learn about more than three centuries of military history.

CANCALE

  • Cancale is a lovely fishing harbor nestled behind the cliffs, 15 kilometers from Saint-Malo, and is famous for its oysters, which are visible at low tide on the oyster beds.

DINARD

  • Dinard was a popular holiday destination for the British throughout the nineteenth century, and it is a charming holiday town that retains the elegance and architecture of the past while offering a variety of tourist activities (including a terrific market on Saturday mornings throughout the year).

DINAN

  • Dinan, a former medieval town of the Dukes of Brittany, sits above the Rance Estuary on a rocky outcrop. Check out the ancient ramparts and streets, as well as the English garden.

LE MONT-SAINT-MICHEL

The Mont Saint Michel Abbey, which is located in the Manche department in the Basse Normandy area and 55 kilometers from Saint-Malo, is France’s second most visited and most spectacular tourist attraction. This site has been on the UNESCO World Heritage List since 1979. Enjoy your thalassotherapy vacation in Saint-Malo and get to know this great city!

Saint-Malo – Travel guide at Wikivoyage

Boats in the port, with the historic district of Intramuros in the backdrop Saint-Malois is a tiny walled seaside city in the French province of Brittany.

Understand

Saint-Malo was formerly a dreaded pirate fortress (corsairs’ base), highly defended against Norman (or English) invasion, and now it is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Brittany.

The highlight of the performance is the dramatic walled city (intramuros), which was completely devastated during World War II but has been meticulously rebuilt since then. The present settlements of Parame and Saint-Servan are located beyond the walls of the fortifications.

Get in

Even though the railway station is located more than a kilometer south of the historic center, it is only a 20-minute walk straight along Avenue Louis Martin to get there. From Paris (Gare de Montparnasse), there are a few direct TGV trips available each day that take around three hours. The vast majority of travelers, on the other hand, will end up connecting inRennes, where there are hourly commuter services (50 minutes, €12) to Saint-Malo available.

By ferry

From the United Kingdom, you may take a ferry from Poole with Condor Ferries or from Portsmouth with Brittany Ferries to arrive. Condor Ferries, which operates direct trips between Jersey and Guernsey, can transport you between the two islands.

By bus

It is possible to get to Pontorson by bus twice daily (line 17, 1 hour, €2,5), which departs from the train station and stops at the city walls. They are scheduled to link with onward buses to Mont Saint Michel (20 minutes, €2,8), providing for a rather easy day-trip from Paris.

By plane

It is possible to go around by bus in Saint-Malo, with the major terminals being at the railway station and immediately outside the city limits (St Vincent). Any bus driver will be able to provide you with a brochure containing maps and schedules. It costs €1.15 for a one and a half-hour admission. In the evening, there are no bus services available, which is unfortunate. If you don’t want to walk around the walled city, there’s always the tourist train, which costs €5.50 and will take you and your pocketbook on a short journey around town.

See

  • The walls of the walled city (La Ville Intra-Muros)
  • The Chateau
  • The walled city as seen from the “Memorial 39-45”
  • And the Rance tidal power station are all visible. According to reports, the tidal power plant receives 200,000 visitors every year. The passage of 16,000 boats between the English Channel and the Rance is made possible by a canal lock located at the west end of the dam. While the display center is in need of repair, the barrage wall offers nothing in the way of visual stimulation. The Musée Jacques Cartier (Jacques Cartier Museum), rue David Macdonald Stewart, +33 02 99 40 97 73, is a little difficult to find, but bus lines C1 and C2 will take you there in about a kilometer. It has been restored and outfitted to reflect the daily life and travels of Cartier, who discovered and claimed Canada for France in the mid-16th century (as of May 2020).

Do

  • Keep an eye out for the amazing tide
  • Take a stroll (or jog) down the beach. Take a walk around the perimeter of the walled city (it’s free)
  • Visit the Festival des Folklores du Monde (World Folklores), which takes place at the beginning of July and features performances from throughout the world. Performances of dance and music from all around the world are on the program. When Celtic Breton bands perform music in the main plaza of the Parame area, you may also get up and dance. Take a look at the many hundreds of sailing boats of various sizes and ages crammed into the harbor/s
  • It’s a sight to behold.

Buy

In the city center, shops are typically closed by 19 hours, however most of them are now (as of 2010) open on Sundays. -This includes high-street clothing businesses, which were previously prohibited from opening on Sundays but are now permitted to do so.

Eat

Saint-Malo is an excellent site to experience some of the best Breton delicacies.

  • Breton Pancakes include not only the world-renowned sweetcrêpes, but also savorygalettes
  • Kouing Aman is a wonderful Breton cake created with butter and sugar that is sure to please. Try to get them while they’re still hot, especially if there’s apple in them. Mussels (moules): caught in the area and available at any restaurant that serves them. Cancale, a hamlet near Saint-Malo, is known for its oysters (huitres). The best come from Cancale. France is the only country where they are eaten uncooked.

The Intramuros neighborhood is home to what is very probably the biggest concentration of creperies and seafood eateries in all of France. The majority of them are geared mainly for visitors and are almost identical.

  • The Café de Saint-Malo is located right inside the Grande Porte. The restaurant itself is unremarkable, but what distinguishes it as the finest value in Intramuros is the window that sells fresh fish to take away. Petit Crêpier, +33-299409319, offers a dozen huge oysters that have been preshelled, served on ice, and accompanied with a quartered lemon for €5. The address is Rue Ste Barbe. Even though this restaurant is modest and serves crepes, their daily selection of seafood galettes is a cut above the rest of the competition. Coté Brasserie, +33 2-99568340, €10 per person. 8, Rue des Cordiers, 8e étage (intra-muros). Seafoods and chips made just for us. Smoking and non-smoking zones are clearly divided. Captain-Ice, Rue Jacques Cartier, Intra-Muros
  • €20-40
  • Captain-ice.com. This may very well be the greatest ice cream shop in the entire city. If you’re looking for something truly delicious, try Amour de Glace (Love of Ice Cream). Although the prices are a little more than average, the amounts and quality are exceptional
  • Crêperie le Tournesol, 4 rue des marins (Saint-Malo), +33 2-99403623. Brunch in St-Malo consists of only one thing: a galette washed down with a cup of local cider – and no, it’s never too early to indulge in this delectable treat. Try the Crêperie Le Tournesol (16), located at 4 Rue des Marins (00 33 2 99 40 36 23), which has a patio that spills out into cobblestone streets and is open from 11.30 a.m. until midnight on weekends. A range of ingredients, ranging from smoked Breton sausage and egg to goat cheese and Camembert, are available in the restaurant’s specialty galettes, which start at €5.50. You may conclude with something sweet if you have room in your stomach — a crêpe with hot chocolate sauce costs €3.50.

In St Malo, you may dine at any time of the day, including on weekends. In surrounding smaller towns, you can hunt for the “menu ouvrier” (workers’ menu), which is served around lunchtime. Often, there is little to no variety of food, but what you do get is authentic French home cuisine at a fraction of the price of what you would spend in a tourist destination like St Malo or Mont St Michel (Lunch in France is considered to be a holy hour). Every French citizen observes it as if it were a religious holiday.

Drink

Brittany is not a wine-producing area, but it does have a number of other specializations, including:

  • Breton beer, cider, and Calvados (apple brandy), all of which originate in the neighboring Normandy region. Chouchen: mead (which is a combination of alcohol and honey that is extremely sweet)
  • Muscadet: a dry white wine that goes well with local seafood
  • It is not from Brittany, but rather from the nearby vineyard region of Pays de la Loire
  • It is a blend of grapes from the Pays de la Loire and the Pays de la Loire.

Sleep

There are several lodging alternatives in Saint-Malo, including more than 20 hotels within the city walls, but they may fill up quickly during peak season, so plan ahead of time.

Budget

  • Adress: 37 Avenue du R.P. Umbricht (near the beach, 30-40 minutes on foot from the walled city), +33 2 99 40 29 80, [email protected]

Mid-range

  • +33-2-99408770
  • Best Western Central, 7 Grande Rue
  • +33-2-99408770 The location is excellent, being within the main gate of the walled city, however the lower levels can be loud. All of the rooms are tiny but tidy, with some having views out into the street, some having a shower and some having a bath. There is free WiFi accessible (separate charge). There is no parking. €98
  • San Pedro, 1 rue Sainte Anne, +33-2-99408857. San Pedro, 1 rue Sainte Anne, +33-2-99408857. Within the walls of the city, a comfortable modest hotel with a nautical motif. The rooms are equipped with a shower, a WC, a television, and wireless internet access. Breakfast is served on a daily basis with a different theme (for an additional €7.50). Bookings made over the internet are unreliable
  • Therefore, contact to confirm. €55/67 without/with a view of the water

Splurge

  • Pay a visit to the area Mont Saint Michel is a monastery and town constructed on a little outcrop of rock in the sand that is cut off from the rest of the world when the tides are high enough. It is one of France’s most popular tourist sites, and as a result, it is quite crowded during the summer months. Before you go, make sure you know what time the tides are. Visit Dinard by crossing the Rance Tidal Dam (Barrage de la Rance), which is particularly attractive in October when the town celebrates the annual English Film Festival (lots of US films, too). Casino, sandy beaches, towering cliffs dotted with beautiful Victorian-era buildings, many with conical tower tops
  • Covered market
  • And much more. Extend your journey westward beyond Dinard to the Côte d’Emeraude (Emerald Coast), where you’ll find even more luscious sandy beaches and lesser-known towns such as St-Lunaire and St-Cast (the first French town to liberate itself from Nazis by its own efforts in 1944), as well as the lonely, craggy, atmospheric Cap Fréhel, where you can see gannets, the magnificent large seabird that otherwise

A perfect day trip to Saint Malo, France

The city of Saint Malo is located on France’s northwestern coast, in the department of Normandy. I had no prior knowledge of the city before coming, but when I saw that their flag has a ferret and the slogan “ni français, ni breton, malouin suis-je” (neither French nor Breton, I am from St.

Malo), I realized that this was not your usual French city. Below is a brief history of Saint Malo, as well as a list of some of the top things to do in the city.

Walking the walls

The gorgeous backdrop of the city is the city’s most important tourist attraction. The fortified section of the city, known as Intra Muros, is the core of the city and is surrounded by water on three sides. There are various spots to climb up and down the walls, and you may stroll all the way around the city on the tops of them.

Being a Beach Bum

There is no shortage of room on this beach!. Because the location is so shallow, when the tide goes out, it is a long distance away from the houses along the beach, which gives the impression of being less congested. An outdoor salt water pool with a diving board is located on one side of the city with a spectacular view of the yachts and houses along the harbor. Because of the neighboring rocky outcrops, there are several animals that may be found in the tidal pools.

Privateer History

Saint Malo is distinguished by its unique history as theville corsaire, or privateer city, which dates back to the 13th century. Because of the city’s strategic location, it was battled over by the King of France and the Dukes of Brittany, and it acquired its own identity as a walled city in the process. You may discover more about this history by taking a guided tour of theDemeure deCorsaire, a home once owned by a family of privateers. Our amusingly quirky tour guide stated that unruly pirates were hanged if they were apprehended.

  1. The punishment for a privateer who lost a combat and was caught was six months imprisonment in prison.
  2. There were also extremely strict regulations for maritime warfare that had to be followed.
  3. People were hanged if they continued to battle after the flag had been taken away by the enemy.
  4. Besides fighting, ships from Saint Malo were also traders, journeying to the Americas and Asia in search of new markets.
  5. This corsaire mansion was seven floors high.
  6. It was also possible for goods on ships to be stolen because when the tides went out, ships could be accessible by foot.
  7. There was a curfew in effect every night at 10:00 p.m.
  8. If you were caught on the streets within the city limits after curfew, you would be sentenced to prison time.
  9. Saint Malo was so concerned about thievery that they purchased massive Mastiff dogs that could grow to be as large as a man.

What happens after curfew while you’re outside the walls? You were thrown to the wolves. At first, I assumed our guide was joking, but no, this was their approach, and based on my observations, it seemed to have worked rather effectively. These dogs were even shown on their coat of arms!

La ReineFort

If you want to learn even more about the area’s history, you may visit a fort that is accessible by foot during low tide. At high tide, though, things are different; you’ll need a boat to get to the fort because it’s located on an island. A number of cannons can be seen within the fort, which, to many people’s surprise, also holds the tomb of the great French writer Chateaubriand. Because I elected not to wait for the guided tour, and because I was unfamiliar with the fort’s history, I wasn’t very impressed with the structure itself.

In order to save money on entry, there is a hill nearby that you may climb for free if you are only there for the sights.

Food and Dining

Oysters are plentiful in Saint Malo, and you may find them on the menus of many Malouin restaurants because the city is in oyster country. There are also a few establishments that specialize just in oysters. For those seeking more than simply oysters, theBreizh Caferestaurant offers an intriguing idea that is worth exploring. The Breton entrepreneur had previously lived in Japan and now develops Japanese-Breton fusion cuisine that is nothing if not inventive. Gallettes (buckwheat crepes) are served, as is sushi and everything in between, including gallette sushi, which I had to try out of curiosity.

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Kuwin amman (pronounced kuwin ahmon) is an elaborately layered spherical butter pastry that is served hot or cold.

They promise that the pastries will remain fresh for a month after being vacuum packed, so you may take some home with you!

Cruises

If you’ve had a little too much kouign amman, there are a plethora of boat trips to choose from. Unfortunately, I did not have time to participate in one, but it would have been the most effective method to view the region. Compagnie Corsaire offers a variety of excursions, ranging from a 10-minute water bus ride to neighboring Dinard to a half-day fishing expedition. A sunset cruise would be an excellent way to round off a wonderful day in Saint Malo, France! If you’re planning a vacation to France, check out our list of the greatest tiny villages for day excursions in Brittany.

Saint-Malo – Wikitravel

Saint-Malois a small walled coastal town inBrittany,France.

Understand

Boats in the port, with the historic district of Intramuros in the backdrop Saint-Malo was formerly a dreaded pirate fortress (corsairs’ base), highly defended against Norman (or English) invasion, and now it is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Brittany. The highlight of the performance is the dramatic walled city (intramuros), which was completely devastated during World War II but has been meticulously rebuilt since then.

The present settlements of Parame and Saint-Servan are located beyond the walls of the fortifications. It is also the birthplace of Jacques Cartier, the famed French explorer who is most known for discovering the province of Quebec.

Get in

Dinard-Pleurtuit-St-Malo Airport is 13 kilometers away and served by Ryanair. In order to get to and from the airport, there is no public transit available. The normal cab fee to the railway station in Saint-Malo is €22, while the trip to the walled city is €25. Both are reasonable prices. Alternatively, a cab to Dinard (€13) and then a bus to Illenoo bus 16 (€2.10) are also viable alternatives. If you want to avoid using a cab, you may walk 2.8 kilometers to Pleurtuit and then take a bus to Saint-Malo, connecting through Dinard (fares range from €2.10 to €4.20, depending on how many transfers you make).

By train

Dinard-Pleurtuit-St-Malo Airport is 13 kilometers distant, and Ryanair provides service there as well. In order to go to and from the airport, you must use a taxi. It costs €22 in cab fare to get to the train station in Saint-Malo, and it costs €25 to get into the walled city. Alternatively, a cab to Dinard (€13) and then a bus to Illenoo bus 16 (€2.10) are also viable options. You may walk 2.8 kilometers to Pleurtuit and then take a bus to Saint-Malo, connecting through Dinard (fares range from €2.10 to €4.20, depending on the connections made), if you want to avoid taking a cab journey.

By ferry

From the United Kingdom, you may take the Pooleon Condor Ferries to arrive. Brittany Ferries will be departing from Portsmouth. Condor Ferries, which operates direct trips between Jersey and Guernsey, can transport you between the two islands. With Condor Ferries, the journey from Poole takes between 6 and 13 hours, depending on the season of year and the date of travel. It is necessary to transfer at Jersey (an island immediately north of Saint Malo) in order to arrive in St Malo. Ferries run on a daily basis, and in certain cases, twice a day.

Taking the Brittany Ferries from Portsmouth at 8:15pm every day except Tuesday, you may go to France.

Depending on the class, prices range from £25-30 (economy plus £5 for a seat) to £62+ for a minimum two-berth cabin.

By bus

Illenoo buses service Dinard and Titeniac, from whence connections to Rennes are available, whether coming from or heading to Rennes. This is a slower but less expensive alternative to using the railway, with fares ranging from €4.70 to €6.80 depending on the specific route followed.

By Car

There are numerous huge carparks located around the historic walled city (intramuros), all of which are properly marked and are not too costly. Only inhabitants are permitted to park within the walls, so park your car outside and explore on foot instead.

Get around

It is possible to go around by bus in Saint-Malo, with the major terminals being at the railway station and immediately outside the city limits (St Vincent). Any bus driver will be able to provide you with a brochure containing maps and schedules. It costs €1.15 for a one and a half-hour admission. In the evening, there are no bus services available, which is unfortunate. The walled city may be readily explored on foot, but you can also take a 40-minute trip on the “Tourist Train,” which provides narration in a variety of languages in addition to English.

From April to October, the bus departs from near the tourist information center right outside Porte Saint-Vincent (adults pay €7, children pay €5).

See

  • Ramparts(Remparts). With the exception of a tiny gap at Porte Saint-Vincent and the town hall, it is possible to stroll on top of the walls all the way around the ancient city center (which looks like a castle). The ramparts walk may be accessible through a series of stairways that can be found throughout the old city, as well as a few elevators. Once atop the walls, the walkway is broad and nicely paved, making it a breeze to stroll along. The entire circle is around 2 kilometers in length, and the views in all directions are breathtaking
  • The fortified city (La Ville Intra-Muros). TheCathedral of Saint-Vincent, which is in the heart of the walled city
  • TheChateau
  • The walled city view from “Memorial 39-45”
  • The world’s first tidal power station
  • There are several stores, restaurants, and hotels in the ancient city. According to reports, the tidal power plant receives 200,000 visitors every year. The passage of 16,000 boats between the English Channel and the Rance is made possible by a canal lock located at the west end of the dam. While the display center is in need of repair, the barrage wall offers nothing in the way of visual stimulation. There are bus lines C1 and C2 that take you within a kilometer of the location, although getting there might be difficult. edit

Do

  • Visit the Fort National, which was erected in 1689 on a tiny island immediately north of the medieval walled city and is worth a visit. It is open from June to September, as well as on select other weekends (€5 for adults, €3 for children), but only at low tide due to the fact that you must walk over the beach to get to the attraction. Check the website for operating hours, which vary from day to day depending on the tides.
  • Visit the Fort National, which was erected in 1689 on a tiny island immediately north of the old walled city and was dedicated to the French Revolution in 1789. Located on the beach, it is only accessible at low tide since you must walk through the sand to get there. It is open from June to September and on select other weekends (€5 for adults, €3 for children). For operating hours, which change according on the tides, visit the webpage here.
  • Take a look at the many hundreds of sailing boats of various sizes and ages crammed into the harbor/s
  • It’s a sight to behold.

Buy

The calendar with the treasures Website: 2 route de la great hermine, intra-muros. Delicatessen shop in the French style. Wineshop. Shopping centers typically close at 19 hours, although the majority of them currently (as of 2010) remain open on Sundays, including high-end clothing businesses that were formerly prohibited from doing so but are now permitted to do so.

Eat

Saint-Malo is an excellent site to experience some of the best Breton delicacies.

  • Breton Pancakes include not only the world-renowned sweetcrêpes, but also savorygalettes
  • Kouing Aman is a wonderful Breton cake created with butter and sugar that is sure to please. Try to get them while they’re still hot, especially if there’s apple in them. Mussels (moules): caught in the area and available at any restaurant that serves them. Cancale, a hamlet near Saint-Malo, is known for its oysters (huitres). The best come from Cancale. France is the only country where they are eaten uncooked.

The Intramuros neighborhood is home to what is very probably the biggest concentration of creperies and seafood eateries in all of France. The majority of them are geared mainly for visitors and are almost identical.

  • Because you are actually on the wall, the Corps de Garde offers the best view of the walled city. Galettes and crepes are available at this establishment.
  • The Café de Saint-Malo is located right inside the Grande Porte. The restaurant itself is unremarkable, but what distinguishes it as the finest value in Intramuros is the window that sells fresh fish to take away. For €5, you may buy a dozen huge oysters that have been pre-shelled, served on ice, and accompanied by a quartered lemon.
  • Petit Crêpier is located on Rue Ste Barbe and can be reached at +33-299409319. Even though this restaurant is modest and serves crepes, their daily selection of seafood galettes is a cut above the rest of the competition. €10
  • Coté Brasserie is located at 8, rue des Cordiers (intra-muros), and can be reached at 2-99568340. Seafoods and chips made just for us. Smoking and non-smoking zones are clearly divided. €20-40
  • Captain-Ice is located on Rue Jacques Cartier in the Intra-Muros neighborhood. This may very well be the greatest ice cream shop in the entire city. If you’re looking for something truly delicious, try Amour de Glace (Love of Ice Cream). Because you get such large numbers and such excellent quality, the prices are a little more.
  • In St Malo, you may dine at any time of the day, including on weekends. Check out the lunchtime menu ouvrière (workers’ menu) in nearby smaller towns
  • There is often little or no choice of dishes, but what you get is authentic French home cooking (love those fries!) for half the price, if not less, than you would pay in a tourist destination like St Malo or Mont St Michel. (Lunchtime in France is considered sacrosanct.) (Crêperie le Tournesol, 4 rue des marins (Saint-Malo), +2 99403623, is a place where every French person observes it faithfully.) St-Malo brunch consists of one thing: a galette washed down with a cup of local cider for €3.50 — no, it’s never too early to start eating! Try the Crêperie Le Tournesol (16), located at 4 Rue des Marins (00 33 2 99 40 36 23), which has a patio that spills out into cobblestone streets and is open from 11.30 a.m. until midnight on weekends. A range of ingredients, ranging from smoked Breton sausage and egg to goat cheese and Camembert, are available on the menu’s speciality galettes, which start at €7.50. If you still have space for dessert, a crêpe with hot chocolate sauce costs €4.50 and is a delicious way to end your meal. edit

Drink

Brittany is not a wine-producing region that is well-known. There are a few different specialties to choose from: In Saint Malo, there are two microbreweries to choose from. Boscoandles brassins de Saint Malo (Saint Malo Brassins). As well as national beers, there are various regional beers available such asCoreff, which can be purchased at La Belle Epoque pub, and Brit beer, which can be purchased at several stores. Chat Malo is a Breton beer, however it is not made at Saint Malo, as the name suggests.

  • Cider: In Saint Malo, there are two varieties of cider to choose from. Demi-sec and Brut are two of the most powerful weapons in the world. You’re undoubtedly used to seeing Brut on a regular basis. Demi-sec is sweeter and has a lesser percentage of alcohol than regular champagne. Calvados is a brandy made from apples. Chouchen: mead (which is a combination of alcohol and honey that is extremely sweet)
  • Muscadet: a dry white wine that goes well with local seafood
  • It is not from Brittany, but rather from the nearby vineyard region of Pays de la Loire
  • It is a blend of grapes from the Pays de la Loire and the Pays de la Loire. Bars: The majority of bars may be located in the historic center of Intramuros. The following are some nice pubs to visit if you wish to explore into the less picturesque, but also less touristy, districts of Saint Malo. BothBosco and thecafe de la gare, which are located near the railway station, are excellent choices. Near Saint Servan, the Café Cancalais is a popular hangout, while in Parame, the Isle Jus d’Octobre is a good wine bar.

Sleep

There are several lodging alternatives in Saint-Malo, including more than 20 hotels within the city walls, but they may fill up quickly during peak season, so plan ahead of time.

Budget

  • For further information, contact Matthews Holidays at +44 1483 285213. Camping trips in mobile homes at 4*5* beachfront locations around France. edit
  • Camping Chateau des Ormes, located 20 miles from St Malo, is a family-friendly campsite with a variety of activities. Fishing, golf, horseback riding, a treetop adventure course, swimming pools, and other activities are available in the area.
  • Adress: 37 Avenue du R.P. Umbricht (near the beach, 30-40 minutes on foot from the walled city), phone: 02 99 40 29 80, e-mail:

Mid-range

  • The Best Western Hotel Alexandra is located at 138 Boulevard Hebert and can be reached at +33-2-99561112 (fax: +33-2-99563003). Check-in is at 1300 and check-out is at 1100. There is free WiFi accessible (separate charge). Parking is provided for a charge at the facility. €98.edit
  • San Pedro, 1 rue Sainte Anne, +33-2-99408857, San Pedro, 1 rue Sainte Anne, +33-2-99408857, Within the walls of the city, a comfortable modest hotel with a nautical motif. The rooms are equipped with a shower, a WC, a television, and wireless internet access. Breakfast is served on a daily basis with a different theme (for an additional €7.50). Bookings made over the internet are unreliable
  • Therefore, contact to confirm. €55/67 (without/with a view of the sea). edit
  • Hôtel des Abers, 10, route de la Corne de Cerf, 35400 Saint-Malo, 02 99 40 85 60, Hôtel des Abers, 10, rue de la Corne de Cerf, 35400 Saint-Malo (). Patricia and Philippe, who own a modest family institution in the heart of Saint-historic Malo’s center, invite you to stay in one of their 14 rooms and provide you with individual recommendations for your stay in the city. Don’t miss out on their excellent breakfast buffet, which has a broad selection of fresh and locally sourced ingredients. edit

Splurge

  • Pay a visit to the area Mont Saint Michel is a monastery and town constructed on a little outcrop of rock in the sand that is cut off from the rest of the world when the tides are high enough. It is one of France’s most popular tourist sites, and as a result, it is quite crowded during the summer months. Before you go, make sure you know what time the tides are. Dinard may be found across the Rance Tidal Dam (Barrage de la Rance), particularly in October when the town organizes its annual English Film Festival (Festival du Film Anglais) (lots of US films, too). Casino, sandy beaches, towering cliffs dotted with beautiful Victorian-era buildings, many with conical tower tops
  • Covered market
  • And much more. Extend your journey westward beyond Dinard to the Côte d’Emeraude (Emerald Coast), where you’ll find even more luscious sandy beaches and lesser-known towns such as St-Lunaire and St-Cast (the first French town to liberate itself from Nazis by its own efforts in 1944), as well as the lonely, craggy, atmospheric Cap Fréhel, where you can see gannets, the magnificent large seabird that otherwise

This is ausablearticle.It has information for getting in as well as some complete entries for restaurants and hotels.An adventurous person could use this article, but pleaseplunge forwardandhelp it grow!

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