Where Is Saint John River

Saint John River (Bay of Fundy) – Wikipedia

Saint John River inFredericton, NB
The course of the Saint John River
Etymology Feast Day ofJohn the BaptistBountiful and good / the beautiful river
Location
Countries
Physical characteristics
Source Saint John Ponds
location Somerset County, Maine,United States
elevation 360 m (1,180 ft)
2nd source Little Saint John Lake
location Saint-Zacharie,Quebec,Canada
3rd source Lac Frontière
location Montmagny Regional County Municipality,Quebec,Canada
Source confluence
location Aroostook County, Maine,United States
coordinates 46°33′47″N69°53′06″W / 46.5630°N 69.8850°W
Mouth Bay of Fundy
location Saint John,New Brunswick,Canada
coordinates 45°16′N66°4′W / 45.267°N 66.067°WCoordinates:45°16′N66°4′W / 45.267°N 66.067°W
Length 673 km (418 mi)
Basin size 54,986 km 2(21,230 sq mi)
Discharge
average 990 m 3 /s (35,000 cu ft/s)
Basin features
Tributaries
left Tobique River,Jemseg River,Belleisle Bay,Kennebecasis River
right Allagash River,Aroostook River,Nerepis River
Designations
National Historic Site of Canada
Official name Wolastoq National Historic Site of Canada
Designated July 19, 2011
Reference no. 18954

A river that flows from Northern Maine into Canada and runs south along the western side of New Brunswick before emptying into the Atlantic Ocean in the Bay of Fundy is known as the Saint John River (French: Fleuve Saint-Jean; Maliseet: Wolastoq). The Saint John River is 673 kilometers (418 miles) long and originates in the United States. It is the longest river in eastern Canada, and its drainage basin is one of the biggest on the east coast, covering around 55,000 square kilometers (21,000 sq mi).

The boundary between Quebec and Maine is formed by a tributary that runs for 55 kilometers (35 miles).

Mactaquac, Beechwood, and Grand Falls, New Brunswick are all home to hydroelectric dams that manage the flow of water.

Hydronym

It was on the feast of Saint Johnthe Baptist in 1604 that Samuel de Champlain paid a visit to the mouth of the river and dubbed it the Rivière Saint-Jean; however, this name did not stay long. Many of the streams in the system still have their pre-European names, which is unusual. The Maliseet refer to it as the Wolastoq, which means “bountiful and good,” and they are working to restore this name.

Geography and ecology

The Allagash River originates in the New England/Acadian forests of Maine and Quebec, and flows into New Brunswick at Edmundston, where it is joined by the Madawaska River. The Southwest, Northwest, and Baker branches are among the many branches that originate in the New England/Acadian forests of Maine and Quebec.

Middle basin

The middle segment of the river begins at the junction of theAroostook and Tobique rivers and flows southeast to the Mactaquac Reservoir. Additionally, the Meduxnekeag River flows through this region. This region is the only spot in Atlantic Canada where the Appalachian Hardwood Forest can be found, and it is a World Heritage Site. Wild ginger, black raspberry, wild coffee, maidenhair fern, showy orchis, and other plants that are uncommon in the province are examples. Because to human activity, this forest type, also known as the Saint John River Valley Hardwood Forest, previously covered most of the region but has now been reduced to less than one percent of the land area.

Fine, loamy, and well-drained glacial tills overlying limestone and sandstone provide the soils.

Lower basin

The lower basin, 140 kilometres (90 miles) toSaint John Harbouron theBay of Fundy, consisting of lakes, islands,wetlandsand atidal estuary. TheNashwaak andNerepisrivers, as well as Belleisle Bay, are among the tributaries in this section. The Kennebecasis River, the last of the tributaries, is a fjord with a sill, or rise in depth near the mouth of a fjord, caused by a terminal moraine at its mouth. From Grand Bay, the canal grows narrower and deeper producing a valley where at theReversing Fallsincoming tide causes the flow of water to reverse against the prevailing stream.

A wedge of salt water lies beneath a layer of fresh water on the surface of the river and extends upriver to the 10 metre (30′) shallows at Oak Point, beyond which it is unable to advance.

Formation and hydrology

The lower basin, which stretches from Saint John Harbour on the Bay of Fundy for 140 kilometers (90 miles), is comprised of lakes, islands, marshes, and an estuary. TheNashwaak andNerepisrivers, as well as Belleisle Bay, are among the tributaries that flow through this area. Kennebecasis River is the final tributary and is a fjord with a sill, or rise in depth towards the mouth of afjord, caused by a terminal moraine. At Reversing Falls, the river grows narrower and deeper as it progresses from Grand Bay.

A wedge of salt water lies behind a layer of fresh water on the surface of the river and continues upriver to the 10 metre (30′) shallows at Oak Point, beyond which it is unable to progress.

Flooding

In part due to the fact that the water flow in the spring is six times greater than the usual flow, the valley has always been prone to spring floods. Large amounts of surface runoff from heavy rainfall are the primary cause of floods, which can be worsened by ice jams, high tides, and quick snowmelt. Floods have been recorded for more than 300 years, according to historical records. Flooding has occurred in Edmundston, Grand Falls, Perth-Andover, Hartland, and Woodstock, with the most serious flooding occurring in and around Fredericton and the surrounding area.

Temperatures in the 90s accelerated melting, and strong rains boosted the water level to 8.9 metres (30 feet), which was around 7.6 metres (25 feet) above the summer level.

In 2018, floods of a similar nature happened once more.

By the year 2100, it is expected that the average temperature of New Brunswick would rise by 5 degrees Celsius (9 degrees Fahrenheit) and that precipitation will increase.

Human history

In part due to the fact that the water flow in the spring is six times greater than the usual flow, the valley has always been prone to flooding in spring. Ice jams, strong tides, and quick snowmelt may all worsen flooding, which is the most common source of floods in the United States. Floods have been recorded for more than 300 years, according to historians. Flooding has occurred in Edmundston, Grand Falls, Perth-Andover, Hartland, and Woodstock, with the most serious flooding occurring in and around Fredericton and the surrounding areas.

In 1936, high temperatures accelerated snowmelt, and heavy rains boosted the water level to 8.9 metres (30′), which was approximately 7.6 metres (25′) over the summer level at that time.

In 2018, floods of a similar magnitude happened once more.

With climate change, it is projected that the intensity and frequency of floods would both rise. Predictions indicate that the average temperature of New Brunswick will rise by 5 degrees Celsius (9 degrees Fahrenheit) by the year 2100, and that the amount of precipitation will also increase.

Gallery

  • New Brunswick’s Saint John
  • The Mactaquac Dam
  • The Great Falls on the River St. John in New Brunswick, painted by Henry Holland in 1782
  • And the Mactaquac Dam. A view of the railroad bridge in Woodstock, looking south, during the springtime season 1936: A spring freshet and ice break up at Westfield on the Saint John River

See also

  • It was Henry Holland who painted Great Falls on the River St. John in New Brunswick in 1782, and he was born in Saint John, New Brunswick. He died at Mactaquac Dam in New Brunswick. In the spring, a view of the railroad bridge at Woodstock from the south. In 1936, a spring freshet and ice break up near Westfield on the Saint John River.

References

  1. The Canadian Encyclopedia has a page on the Saint John River. The original version of this article was published on December 27, 2018. retrieved on December 27th, 2018
  2. “St. John River Valley,” by Robin Esrock, published in National Geographic. The original version of this article was published on December 27, 2018. “St. John Watershed,” which was retrieved on December 27, 2018. Maine Rivers are a collection of rivers in Maine. The original version of this article was published on October 19, 2016. retrieved on December 27th, 2018
  3. Roy MacGregor’s “Fishing for Answers” may be found here. The Globe and Mail is a Canadian newspaper. The original version of this article was published on November 28, 2017. Natural Resources Canada’s “Saint John River” was retrieved on December 27th, 2018. The Canadian government is responsible for this website. The original version of this article was published on December 30, 2018. Archived from the original on December 27, 2018
  4. “The St. John River: The Good and the Bountiful.” Canadian Geographic. The original version of this article was published on December 27, 2018. Poitras, Jacques (December 2018)
  5. Jacques Poitras (December 2018)
  6. (June 8, 2017). “The Maliseet want the name of the St. John River changed back to ‘Wolastoq,’ although there is no agreement on the spelling.” The CBC News. The original version of this article was published on July 15, 2017. On July 21, 2017, I was able to get a hold of
  7. Olson, D. M., E. Dinerstein, and colleagues (2001). “Terrestrial Ecoregions of the World: A New Map of Life on Earth” is the title of a new book published by Springer-Verlag. DOI:10.1641/0006-3568(2001)051 2.0.CO
  8. 2.ISSN0006-3568. BioScience, 51(11), 933–938
  9. Doi:10.1641/0006-3568(2001)051 2.0.CO
  10. 2. “Appalachian Hardwoods” is an article that was originally published on October 14, 2011. The Nature Trust of New Brunswick is a non-profit organization dedicated to conserving nature. The original version of this article was published on December 29, 2018. “Ecology,” which was retrieved on December 28th, 2018. The Meduxnekeag River Association is a non-profit organization. The original version of this article was published on December 29, 2018. abcdefMacDougall, Andrew
  11. Loo, Judy
  12. Retrieved on December 28, 2018
  13. Abcdef (1998). “Natural history of the St. John River Valley hardwood forest in western New Brunswick and northern Maine” is the title of this paper (PDF). The Canadian government is responsible for this website. The Atlantic Forestry Centre is located in Halifax, Nova Scotia. On November 2, 2016, the original PDF version of this document was archived. “Lower Saint John River,” which was retrieved on December 29, 2018. Engineering at the University of New Brunswick. The original version of this article was published on December 27, 2018. abClarke, John
  14. Winistock, John (December 2018)
  15. AbClarke, John
  16. Winistock, John. A view of the salt and fresh water exchange in the lower St. John River from Kennebecasis – Grand Bay Sill, Kennebecasis, New Brunswick. The University of New Brunswick is a public research university in New Brunswick, Canada. The original version of this article was published on April 26, 2018. Government of New Brunswick, “Tidal Waters,” which was retrieved on December 27, 2018. The original version of this article was published on December 29, 2018. Obtainable on December 29, 2018
  17. Government of the Province of New Brunswick, Canada (2015-09-11). http://www2.gnb.ca/news/flooding in New Brunswick. The original version of this article was archived on January 1, 2019. Retrieved2018-12-31
  18. s^ 30th of April Julia Wright of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) Posted on April 30, 2018 at 5:41 p.m. EST | Last updated on April 30, 2018. “Worst floods in New Brunswick history: how 2018 compares | CBC News”. CBC. The original version of this article was archived on February 26, 2019. “New Brunswick’s Flood Risk Reduction Strategy,” which was retrieved on December 31, 2018. (PDF). Climate change vulnerabilities for three St. John River villages have been identified, according to www2.gnb.ca.Archived(PDF)from the original on 2019-01-01. Retrieved2018-12-31
  19. “Key climate-change vulnerabilities found for three St. John River communities.” Canadian News Wire is a news distribution service based in Canada. Record floods in New Brunswick illustrate that the province must adapt to a changing world, according to a scientist, according to Globalnews.ca, which was archived on 28 December 2018. Retrieved 27 December 2018. GlobalNews.ca published an article on May 7th, 2018. Archived from the original on January 1, 2019
  20. Retrieved on December 31, 2018
  21. Richard Foot is the author of this article (2010). “Prehistory”. Dalton, Shawn (2015). “A social ecological history of the St. John River watershed.” Archived from the original on 28 December 2018. Retrieved 27 December 2018. Obtainable on December 29, 2018
  22. The Canadian Encyclopedia has a page on Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet). AbHall, Jason (2015). “Maliseet Cultivation and Climatic Resilience on the Wlastkw/St. John River During the Little Ice Age.” Archived from the original on 28 December 2018. Retrieved 27 December 2018. Accessed on December 27, 2018
  23. AbHall, Jason. “The Environmental and Cultural History of the St. John River.” Acadiensis. Archived from the original on December 28, 2018. Retrieved December 27, 2018. WOLASTOQ NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE OF CANADA NICHE.Archived from the original on December 29, 2018. Retrieved December 28, 2018. Parks Canada is a federally funded organization. The Canadian government is responsible for this website. From the original on December 27, 2018, this page has been accessed: December 27, 2018.

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to the Saint John River.

St. Johns Rivers – SJRWMD

The longest river in Florida is a living, breathing chameleon. During its gradual 310-mile northerly trek, the St. Johns River transforms from a swamp in Indian River County into a large canal with panoramic views as it meanders to northeast Florida and into the Atlantic Ocean. The St. Johns River is the longest river in the United States. Alligators, wading birds, and ducks can be found in large numbers in the sawgrass marsh sections of the river’s headwaters. In Brevard County, the marsh transforms into a navigable river that twists and turns gently as it makes its way north.

  1. As the river exits Putnam County and enters Clay and St.
  2. After passing through Mayport in Duval County, the longest river in the state of Florida comes to a conclusion where it merges with the Atlantic Ocean, where it is known as the St.
  3. The St.
  4. The tannins in the St.
  5. As sea levels fell, barrier islands formed a stumbling block, preventing water from moving eastward to the ocean and being trapped.
  6. Johns River, which flows into the Atlantic Ocean.
  7. Johns River, which is one of the few rivers in the United States that runs north, is considered to be one of the world’s laziest rivers.

At the beginning and end of each day, an incoming tide from the Atlantic Ocean forces the river’s flow to reverse.

High and prolonged northeasterly winds can cause the flow to be reversed for several days at a time.

The St.

For this reason, due to the river’s northerly flow, it is referred to as the upper basin, which is the area to the south that contains the marshy headwaters of Indian River and Brevard counties.

It is the area in northeast Florida between Putnam County and the river’s mouth in Duval County, where the river drains into the Atlantic Ocean, that is known as the lower basin.

Johns River.

Johns River, there is a plethora of wildlife.

In addition to being rich in history and culture, the St. Johns River also has significant environmental and aesthetic value, plays an essential part in the economy, and provides as a place of refuge for both humans and wildlife.

Our River

Our river’s 310-mile trip begins at its headwaters or source on Blue Cypress Lake in Indian River County, Florida, which is located in the upper basin (about 30 miles west of Vero Beach, FL). It is the most difficult stretch of the river to travel due to the unclear banks, many marshes, and small lakes. There is no major channel in this section of the river, making it the most difficult region to traverse. The flow of our river is fueled by rains and a few springs in this area. A few of the more significant lakes in the upper basin are as follows: Lake Hell n’ Blazes (also known as “Lake Hell n’ Blazes”), Sawgrass Lake (also known as “Lake Washington,” Lake Winder (also known as “Lake Winder”), Ruth Lake (also known as “Lake Poinsett,” Puzzle Lake (also known as “Lake Harney,” “Lake Jesup,” and Lake Munroe.

  1. Johns River system.
  2. Johns River becomes quicker, and the more than 100 springs located mostly in this region of the Watershed contribute to the river’s natural flow, which accounts for approximately 30% of the river’s total natural flow.
  3. The middle basin includes the Ocala National Forest and Lake George, which is the largest lake on the St.
  4. The lower basin begins at the confluence of the Ocklawaha River, the greatest tributary of the St.
  5. After entering Clay County, which is home to Black Creek and Doctor’s Lake, the river widens to an average of 2 miles in width.
  6. In Jacksonville, where it makes its first eastward bend, the St.

Saint Johns River

The Saint Johns River is a navigable stream in northeastern Florida, United States, and is the state’s longest river. After 300 miles of travel, it begins in the Brevard county swamps southwest of Melbourne, in the state’s east-central region, and flows north parallel to the Atlantic coast until it turns at Jacksonville, 15 miles (25 kilometers) to the east, where it empties into the ocean after a course of 300 miles (485 km). The river creates numerous big lakes, the largest of which being Lake George, which is located on the eastern border of the Ocala National Forest.

  1. A navigable stretch of the St.
  2. In the area north of Palatka and east of Jacksonville, it forms a large estuary with its deepest channel measuring around 40 feet (12 metres) in depth and is a marsh.
  3. The St.
  4. The river is vital for shipping as well as pleasure, particularly fishing, on both sides of the river.
  5. Johns in the late 18th century.
  6. Water and Its Various Forms: A Quiz from Britannica Despite the fact that water may be found in three different states, there is only one correct answer to the questions in this test.

Test your water-related knowledge by jumping in. while you watch to see if you sink or swim. Amy Tikkanen has made the most current revisions and updates to this page.

Florida Road Trip: 19 Old Towns on the St Johns River

The St. Johns River is the longest river in Florida and is located in the state of Florida. Only a few rivers in the United States run from south to north, making the Mississippi one of them. From Mayport to Sanford, the St. Johns River is navigable. Beginning in the marshy lowlands of western Indian River County near Blue Cypress Lake, the river flows into the Gulf of Mexico. Winslow Homer’s painting of the St. Johns River Florida’s history dates back to the beginning of time, and the St. Johns River traverses through 18 distinct counties on its long trip north to the coast.

  • Here is a list of some of the Florida cities and towns that have played a role in that history.
  • MAYPORT is located near the mouth of the St Johns River, which empties into the Atlantic Ocean.
  • More information on Mayport may be found by clicking on the photo.
  • This city is located little over a quarter-mile south of the Georgia border.
  • It is a tiny community on the St.
  • Hendry County is a suburb of Jacksonville, Florida, and was originally established in the aim of developing the citrus industry there.
  • Moosehaven, a retirement community for members of the Loyal Order of Moose, is located in the town of Northfield.

A little town on the east bank of the St.

It is located on State Road 13, which is picturesque.

More information on Mandarin may be found by clicking on the image.

Johns River, on State Road 13 south of Mandarin and just south of Mandarin.

It was built on the site of the previous Switzerland Plantation.

Switzerland has a historical marker.

Augustine, there is a ghost town and place name called TOCOI.

Augustine, although that was before to the Civil War.

Tocoi Sketch from the Florida Memory collection at the State Library of Florida Florida’s State Archives GREEN COVE SPRINGSis a little village that was established as a winter resort for northerners in the early 1900s.

More information on Green Cove Springs may be found by clicking on the photo.

Its name comes from the Seminole term for “cow crossing,” which means “cow crossing.” Due to its advantageous location on the river, Palatka is one of the state’s oldest cities and one of the state’s most historic.

More information on Palatka may be found by clicking on the photographs.

Johns River, across from the town of Palatka.

Federal Point’s St.

It lies in close proximity to the ghost town of Rollestown, which was founded in 1767 as an agricultural colony.

The Rollestown Monument is located in San Mateo, Florida.

More information about Log Cabin Winery may be found by clicking on the photo.

About 600 people reside in this community.

More information on Welaka may be found by clicking on the photo.

Johns River, in a small section of the river.

More information on the Fort Gates Ferry may be found by clicking on the photo.

Johns River by a creek known as Dunn’s Creek.

The little village is located east of Georgetown and Welaka in the midst of some very beautiful countryside.

At the point where State Road 40 crosses the St.

It is located on the west side of the river in Lake County.

The majority of people refer to both banks of the river as Astor.

Stetson College is located in the city of DELAND.

There are fishing camps, marinas, and restaurants in this area, all of which have access to the St.

More information on DeLand may be found by clicking on the photo.

Johns River and Lake Monroe on its eastern and southern borders, respectively.

He built a lodge named DeBary Hall, which has been preserved as a museum and is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

ENTERPRISE is located on the north coast of Lake Monroe, directly across the street from Sanford.

Titusville used to be serviced by a railroad that went east from Titusville.

Sanford is located 22 miles north of Orlando on Lake Monroe, which is a vast swath of water on the St.

Upstream of the lake, the river becomes increasingly shallow.

Sanford is a charming small waterfront community with a lot to offer.

Over 117,287 people like our Facebook page and share their enthusiasm for Florida’s “off the beaten path” destinations such as small towns and tourist sites; maps; hotels; cuisine; festivals; beautiful road trips; day excursions; history; culture; nostalgia; and other things to do.

Please have a look at it and, if you like it, we would appreciate it if you could give us a “like.” SUBSCRIBE TO OUR COMPLIMENTARY EZINE Backroads Travel, a California-based tour operator that plans and executes travel programs across the world, is not related with or supported by Florida Back Roads Travel.

Designed and developed by Mike Miller, Copyright 2009-2022 Florida-Back-Roads-Travel.com Policy Regarding Personal Information

St. Johns River FAST FACTS

The St. Johns River offers a wide variety ofrecreational opportunities, many of which are located within a short drive of Titusville.The St. Johns River Water Management District has acquired more than 500,000 acres of land throughout its 18-county jurisdiction, most of which is open to the public.For a list of recreational opportunities, visit the District’s Web site atwww.sjrwmd.com/recreationguide.Examples of nearby recreation opportunities include:
  • Located in Florida, the St. Johns River is the state’s longest river at 260 miles long. Only a few rivers in the United States run from south to north, and the Mississippi River is one of those rivers. From Mayport to Sanford, the St Johns River is navigable. A marshy region in western Indian River County near Blue Cypress Lake serves as the starting point for the river. Winslow Homer’s painting, The St. Johns River This historic river has been a part of Florida’s history since its beginnings, and it goes through 18 distinct counties on its gradual trip northward to the Atlantic Ocean. In Florida, the St. Johns River is near Welaka. A number of Florida cities and municipalities have played important roles in the state’s history. If you were to go upstream from the Atlantic Ocean southward to Sanford in the Orlando metro region, you would see them in the same sequence as if you were to travel downstream. Located at the mouth of the St Johns River, MAYPORT is a port on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean. There are still fishermen living there, and the lighthouse was erected in 1858 to serve the community. Mayport may be found by clicking on the image. JACKSONVILLEis the most culturally southern significant city in Florida, and it has been a major seaport from the city’s inception. This city is located little over 25 miles south of the Georgia state line. For additional information on Jacksonville, please see the photo. It is a tiny town on the St. Johns River’s west bank, about 30 miles south of Jacksonville, on the western side of the river. It is a suburb of Jacksonville, Florida, and was developed with the intention of building a citrus industry. That ideal came to an end with the Great Freeze of 1894-1895. As well as a retirement community for members of the Loyal Order of Moose, Moosehaven is located inside the municipality. A place to stay in Orange Park called Moosehaven. MANDARIN is a small town on the east bank of the St. Johns River, not far south of the city of Jacksonville, Florida. It is located on State Road 13, which is quite picturesque. Known as “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” country, it is most known as the home of novelist Harriet Beecher Stowe, who lived there for a period of time. For further information about Mandarin, please see the photo. Swissland is a tiny town located on the east bank of the St. Johns River on State Road 13 south of Mandarin. It’s in the neighborhood of Fruit Cove and Julington Creek, among other places. On the old location of Switzerland Plantation, this development has been constructed. Even up until recently, there was a general shop on the premises, where old timers enjoyed sitting on the porch and exchanging tales. Marker of historical significance in Switzerland Florida On the east side of the river, 15 miles west of St. Augustine, there is a ghost town and a settlement named TOCOI. At one point, a railroad connected the river with St. Augustine, but that was before the Civil War. After the Civil War, it was modernized with steam engines and steel rails, which replaced the mule-powered version. a sketch by Tocoi from the Florida Memory Collection at the State Library The Florida State Archives It is a little town that was established as a northerners’ getaway in the early 1900s. Over 600 significant United States Navy ships were decommissioned at specially built piers on the Hudson River beginning in 1947, according to the National Park Service. Green Cove Springs may be found by clicking on the photo. PALATKA is situated at a steep bend in the river, which serves as an unofficial barrier between “upriver” and “downriver” in the region. “Cow crossing” is a term that comes from the Seminole language. Due to its advantageous location on the river, Palatka is one of the oldest cities in Florida. As the water became too shallow farther upstream, the huge boats were forced to come to a halt. Explore Palatka by clicking on the images below. The EASTERN FEDERAL POINT PALATKA are located on the east side of the St. Johns River, across the river from Palatka. On the banks of the river in East Palatka sits Corky Bell’s Seafood Restaurant. Federal Point’s St. Paul’s Church. At the crossroads of US-17 and State Road 100, SAN MATEO is located on the river south of East Palatka, Florida. A ghost town known as Rollestown, which was formed in 1767 as an agricultural colony, is located close by to this location. Economically, it was a failure, and all that is left of it now is a historical monument. In the vicinity of San Mateo, Florida is the Rollestown Monument. SATSUMA It has a river frontage that is primarily marshy, but it also has a lovely 55+ mobile home neighborhood on the river and a charming tiny vineyard close. Log Cabin Winery may be found by clicking on the photo. WELAKA, which is located on the east side of the river, is a popular fishing site for both locals and visitors alike. This community has a population of around 600 people. You may stay at Welaka Lodge, which is among the best in the area. Welaka may be found by clicking on the photo. Georgetown is located on the east bank of the St. Johns River, in a small section of the river that is only a few miles long and three miles wide. It is in close proximity to Drayton Island as well as the Fort Gates Ferry terminals. Visit the Fort Gates Ferry website by clicking on the photo. CRESCENT CITY is located on Crescent Lake, which is linked to the St. Johns River by Dunn’s Creek. It’s possible to catch some really good fish out on the lake. East of Georgetown and Welaka, in the midst of some very beautiful landscape, is the small settlement of Welaka. More information on Crescent City may be found by clicking on the image. At the point where State Road 40 crosses the St. Johns River, ASTOR is an unincorporated community. It is located on the west side of the Mississippi River in Lake County, Illinois. In the county of Volusia, on the east side of the river, there is an unincorporated town called as Volusia. Both sides of the river are referred to as Astor by the majority of people. More information on Astor may be found by clicking on the image. Stetson College is located in DELAND, Florida. However, although it is not on the river, it is near by and has a DeLand address because it is in the western part of town. The St. Johns River is accessible from this site, which includes fishing camps, marinas, and restaurants. Visit DeLand by clicking on the picture. DEBARY is bordered by the St. Johns River and Lake Monroe on its eastern and southern borders respectively. A wine trader from New York named Frederick deBary made his home in this building in the 1880s. Today, DeBary Hall, the lodge in which he resided, serves as a museum and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Hall of DeBary in DeBary, Florida, United States of America On the north coast of Lake Monroe, across the street from Sanford, is ENTERPRISE. Because the water becomes quite shallow upstream, the steamers used to come here to complete their journeys in days gone by. An historic train line went from Titusville eastward in the olden days. Visit the Enterprise website by clicking on the picture. Sanford is located 22 miles north of Orlando on Lake Monroe, which is a huge swath of water in the St. John’s River. Upstream of the lake, the river becomes shallow. Because the St Johns is a north-flowing river, upstream means in this case to the south. In the heart of the Florida Keys, Sanford is a charming little seaside community. More information on Sanford may be found by clicking on the photo. Over 117,287 people like our Facebook page and share their enthusiasm for Florida’s “off the beaten path” destinations such as small towns and tourist sites
  • Maps
  • Hotels
  • Cuisine
  • Festivals
  • Beautiful road trips
  • Day excursions
  • History
  • Culture
  • Nostalgia
  • And other topics. On a daily basis, we publish new content. Thank you for taking the time to look at it and for your consideration of a “like” on our Facebook page if you enjoyed it. JOIN OUR FREE EZINE BY CLICKING HERE. Neither Florida Back Roads Travel nor Backroads, a California-based tour operator that plans and runs travel programs across the world, are related with or approved by one another. Designed and developed by Mike Miller, copyright 2009-2022 Florida-Back-Roads-Travel.com Policy Regarding Personal Data Collection and Usage
Get out there and enjoy the magnificent beauty and splendor of these near-pristine lands that represent some of the best that natural Florida has to offer.Access by motorized vehicle is not allowed on many District-owned properties. On those properties, a parking area with an informational kiosk is provided as a trailhead to access the land for hiking and, unless otherwise restricted, for bicycling, horseback riding and boating. Off-road motorized vehicles, including motorcycles and all-terrain and track vehicles, are not allowed on any District lands.

St. Johns River Water Management District

The St. Johns River is the longest river in Florida and is located in the state’s northeastern region. Only a few rivers in the United States flow from south to north, and the Mississippi River is one of those few. a stretch of the St. Johns River from Mayport to Sanford Beginning in the swampy areas of western Indian River County near Blue Cypress Lake, the river winds its way through the county. Winslow Homer’s painting of the St. Johns River. Because of its long history in Florida, the St.

  • Floating on the St.
  • I’ve arranged them in the same order that you would see them if you were traveling upstream from the Atlantic Ocean southward to Sanford in the Orlando metro area.
  • Built in 1858, the lighthouse serves as a working fishing village.
  • Jacksonville is the most culturally southern of Florida’s large cities and has been a major seaport since its founding.
  • More information about Jacksonville can be found by clicking on the photo.
  • Johns River’s west bank, about 30 miles south of Jacksonville.
  • In 1894-1895, the Great Freeze put an end to that fantasy.

Moosehaven is a resort in Orange Park, Florida.

Johns River, about 30 miles south of Jacksonville, Florida.

It is well-known as the home of Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” who lived there for many years.

SWITZERLANDis a small community located on the east side of the St.

It is in the vicinity of Fruit Cove and Julington Creek.

There used to be a general store there until recently, and old timers used to enjoy sitting on the porch and swapping stories.

Augustine, is TOCOI, a ghost town and place name that has been abandoned.

Augustine.

Tocoi Sketch from the Florida Memory collection at the State Library of Florida.

At specially constructed docks on the river, 600 major U.S.

More information about Green Cove Springs can be found by clicking on the image.

Because of its strategic location on the river, Palatka is one of the state’s oldest cities.

More information about Palatka can be found by clicking on the images.

Johns River, across from Palatka.

Federal Point’s St.

It is in close proximity to the ghost town of Rollestown, which was established in 1767 as an agricultural colony.

The Rollestown Marker is located near San Mateo, Florida.

More information about Log Cabin Winery can be found by clicking on the image.

This village has a population of approximately 600 people.

More information about Welaka can be found by clicking on the image.

Johns River in a narrow section of the river.

More information on the Fort Gates Ferry may be found by clicking on the image.

Johns River by Dunn’s Creek.

The little village is located east of Georgetown and Welaka, in the midst of some very beautiful countryside.

ASTOR is an unincorporated community located on State Road 40, at the point where it crosses the St Johns River.

There is an unincorporated community along the east bank of the river that is officially named as Volusia, and it is located in Volusia County.

More information on Astor may be found by clicking on the image.

Despite the fact that it is not directly on the river, the region west of town is near by and has a DeLand address.

Johns River.

DEBARY is bordered by the St.

A wine trader from New York named Frederick deBary made his residence in this building.

DeBary Hall is located in the city of DeBary, Florida.

Because the water becomes quite shallow upstream, the steamers used to terminate their journeys here in the olden days.

More information about Enterprise may be found by clicking on the image.

The river becomes shallow as it approaches the lake.

Sanford is a charming small community on the ocean.

Our Facebook page has more than 117,287 followers who are interested in off-the-beaten-path Florida: cities, tourist sites, maps, housing, food, festivals, beautiful road trips, day excursions, history, culture, nostalgia, and more.

Please have a look at it and, if you like it, we would appreciate it if you could give it a “like.” SUBSCRIBE TO OUR COMPLIMENTARY EZINE.

Backroads, a California-based tour operator that plans and runs travel programs across the world, is not related with or supported by Florida Back Roads Travel. By Mike Miller, Copyright 2009-2022 Florida-Back-Roads-Travel.com Policy Concerning Personal Information

Facts:

  • The St. Johns is the longest river in Florida – 310 miles long. It is one of the few rivers in the United States that flows north
  • s The land area that drains into a water body is termed a drainage basin – sometimes called a watershed The St. Johns River is separated into three drainage basins
  • Because the river flows north, the upper basin is the area to the south that has the marshy headwaters. The lower basin is the area to the north that contains the marshy headwaters. The middle basin is the area in central Florida where the river expands, resulting in the formation of the lakes Harney, Jesup, Monroe, and George, among others. From Putnam County to the river’s mouth in Duval County, the lower basin is comprised of a huge marshy region in Indian River County
  • The source of the river, or the headwaters, is comprised of a big marshy area in Putnam County. It travels northward before turning eastward near Jacksonville, where it empties into the Atlantic Ocean. The river’s width varies depending on where it flows. Between Palatka and Jacksonville, it is a large marsh at its headwaters that averages more than two miles in width on a daily basis. It expands to generate enormous lakes in central Florida
  • s The entire drop of the river from its source in marshes south of Melbourne to its mouth in the Atlantic near Jacksonville is less than 30 feet, or approximately one inch per mile, making it one of the “laziest” rivers in the world
  • Because the river runs slowly, it is difficult to flush pollutants
  • s Major pollution sources include discharges from wastewater treatment facilities and runoff from urban and agricultural regions after it rains. Pesticides and other contaminants are transported into streams that flow into the river by runoff from agricultural fields. Pollution is prevalent near metropolitan areas
  • s Saltwater enters the river at its mouth in Jacksonville. In seasons of low water, tides may produce a reverse flow as far south as Lake Monroe – 161 miles upstream from the rivers mouth
  • The Wekiva River, the Econlockhatchee River, and the Ocklawaha River are among the major tributaries, or smaller streams and rivers, that flow into the St. Johns River. The St. Johns basin is actually an ancient intracoastal lagoon system
  • The St. Johns River basin is actually an ancient intracoastal lagoon system. Because of the decline in sea level, barrier islands became an impediment to water moving eastward to the ocean. Instead, the water accumulated in the flat valley and slowly wandered northward for almost 300 kilometers. This created the St. Johns River

Recreation Guide to District Lands – Links to Each Recreation Area

The St. Johns River is the longest river in Florida, stretching over 310 miles. It is one of the few rivers in the United States that flows northward; a drainage basin – also known as a watershed – is the geographical area that drains into a water body. In order to accommodate the river’s northward flow, it is separated into three drainage basins. The upper basin is the territory to the south that contains the river’s marshy headwaters, while the lower basin is the area to the north. The middle basin is the area in central Florida where the river expands, resulting in the formation of lakes Harney, Jesup, Monroe, and George, among others.

Between Palatka and Jacksonville, it has a large marsh at its headwaters that averages more than two miles in width.

The most significant sources of pollution are discharges from wastewater treatment facilities and runoff from urban and agricultural regions after rain.

During low water periods, tides may cause a reverse flow as far south as Lake Monroe, 161 miles upstream from the river’s mouth; pollution is concentrated in urban areas; saltwater enters the river at its mouth in Jacksonville; pollution is concentrated in urban areas; and pollution is concentrated in urban areas.

  • Johns River.
  • Johns basin is actually an ancient intracoastal lagoon system; the Ocklawaha River is one of the major tributaries to the river.
  • Instead, the water accumulated in the flat valley and slowly wandered northward for almost 300 miles before resuming its course.
  • Johns River was formed as a result of this.

Camping

In Florida, the St. Johns River is the longest river, stretching over 310 miles through the state. In the United States, it is one of only a few rivers that flows northward. A drainage basin – sometimes known as a watershed – is a geographical region that drains into a water body. In order to accommodate the river’s northward flow, it is separated into three drainage basins. The upper basin is the land to the south that contains the swampy headwaters of the St. Johns. The middle basin is the area in central Florida where the river expands, generating the lakes Harney, Jesup, Monroe, and George.

  1. It travels northward before turning eastward near Jacksonville, where it empties into the Atlantic Ocean.
  2. At its headwaters, it is a large marsh that stretches for more than two miles between Palatka and Jacksonville.
  3. The river’s entire drop from its source in marshes south of Melbourne to its mouth in the Atlantic near Jacksonville is less than 30 feet, or around one inch per mile, making it one of the world’s “laziest” rivers.
  4. Pesticides and other contaminants are carried into the river by this discharge.
  5. The Wekiva River, the Econlockhatchee River, and the Ocklawaha River are among the major tributaries, or smaller streams and rivers, that flow into the St.
  6. Johns basin is really an old intracoastal lagoon system.

As sea levels fell, barrier islands were an impediment to water moving eastward to the ocean. As a result, the water pooled in the flat valley and slowly meandered its way north for almost 300 miles. The St. Johns River was created as a result of this.

Fishing

Fishermen may engage in recreational fishing on District property, subject to the approval of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). Exceptions include areas where signs prohibit fishing. Unless specifically exempted by the FWC, anybody participating in recreational fishing is required to have the relevant fishing licenses in their possession. If any District, FWC, or law enforcement personnel asks to see the license, it must be shown immediately. Licenses for fishing can be purchased from the tax collector’s office of the county in which you intend to fish.

General Information

Except when explicitly prohibited by signage, recreational fishing as approved by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is permitted on District grounds. Unless specifically exempted by the FWC, everybody who engages in recreational fishing is required to have the relevant fishing licenses in their hands. If any District, FWC, or law enforcement personnel asks to see the license, the license must be shown. Obtaining a fishing license may be done at the tax collector’s office of the county in which you intend to fish is straightforward.

Hiking

Except when signs clearly prohibit it, recreational fishing as approved by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is permitted on District grounds. Unless specifically exempted by the FWC, each individual engaged in recreational fishing is required to have the relevant fishing licenses in their possession. It is required that the license be presented upon the request of any employee of the District, the FWC, or police enforcement. Fishing licenses can be purchased at the tax collector’s office in the county in which you want to fish.

Horseback riding

Horseback riding is allowed on many conservation areas on trails in designated areas and established roads and fire lines, except where restricted by signs. Check area maps for horseback riding opportunities.


St. Johns River Facts for Fun

With a total length of 310 miles, the St. Johns River is the longest river in Florida and the longest in the world. It travels through 12 counties as it makes its way from northeast Florida to the Atlantic Ocean in the south. The St. John’s River is over 3 miles broad at its widest point, which lies at the mouth of the river. It is further subdivided into three river basins and two watersheds for ease of navigation. The Upper Basin of the St. Johns covers around 2,000 square miles, while the Lower Basin covers approximately 2,600 square miles, making it the biggest basin in the system.

It Flows North

The great majority of rivers in the world flow from north to south, according to the United Nations Environment Programme. Most of the time, this is due to the river’s source, which is often mountains, being to the north of the mouth, forcing the water to flow downhill. Nevertheless, it is estimated that fewer than 30 rivers in the United States constitute an exception to the norm and flow northward, including the St. John’s River, according to experts. In this case, the explanation for the irregular flow is due to a tiny incline in the river itself.

Following its beginning in the Saint John’s Marsh, the river’s path gradually descends around 30 feet to its mouth where it meets the Atlantic Ocean. Because of the relatively soft slope, the river flows very slowly; it is really one of the slowest rivers in the world.

It’s VERY Connected

It is estimated that 3.5 million people reside among the different watersheds that feed into the St. Johns River system. It is the primary water body in the St. Johns River Water Management District, which encompasses around 21 percent of Florida’s land area, or approximately 7.8 million acres of water.

It has a Salty Side

When the St. Johns River is formed, it is a network of wetlands that eventually condenses into a blackwater stream. This indicates that, as a result of its groundwater and marsh origins, the River contains a high concentration of fresh water. When the river reaches the Jacksonville region, it is only then that the water begins to taste salty. This is due to the banks of the St. Johns River pushing seawater into the mouth of the river, resulting in the formation of an estuary ecology in the area.

It has…monkeys?

Rhesus Monkeys may be observed monkeying around where the St. Johns River joins the Wekiva River, where the two rivers meet. The origins of the Rhesus Monkeys transports, which are well-known for their excellent swimming ability, are still a mystery. Several hypotheses, on the other hand, exist. Many people believe they were brought in during the filming of Tarzan in the 1930s. Whatever the case, they have settled in nicely to their new home on the St. Johns River in Florida’s Panhandle.

It’s Fun

On the St. Johns River, which is often regarded as the most prominent recreational river in Florida, there is never a shortage of opportunities to have a good time in the sun. The St. Johns River, which is known as the “Bass Fishing Capital of the World,” is home to a diverse array of freshwater fisheries, including large populations of crappie, bluegills, catfish, and other species. Summer tourists may take use of the clean waters for swimming, boating, and scuba diving along the river and its linked watersheds throughout the spring and summer months.

Johns River Water Management District preserves roughly 700,000 acres of area for hiking, camping, hunting, biking, and horseback riding on the shores of the St.

Blue Springs State Park

Aside from that, the St. Johns River is connected to 14 lakes and various Florida springs, including Blue Spring State Park, which is a designated Manatee Refuge. Hundreds of manatees congregate on the surface of the spring throughout the winter months, attracting the attention of observers.

Boat Rentals on the St. Johns River

Boat rentals are available at our Volusia County site in Astor, Florida, through Castaways on the River. Do you want to remain for a while? Cascades on the River, located directly on the St. Johns River, offers you the opportunity to rent a cool cottage or a hotel room today.

Share your Favorite Spot

Do you have a favorite area along the river that you like to visit?

Leave a remark in the section below. You may also follow us on social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter. Don’t forget to tag us in your photos! We would much appreciate hearing from you.

About Castaways on the River

Accommodations at Castaways on the River include boat rentals as well as lodging in the picturesque town of Astor, Florida. Come take in the natural splendor of Central Florida’s freshwaters for yourself. comments on blogs powered by

St. John River Valley

The St. John River, which flows along the western side of New Brunswick and along the border with Quebec to the Bay of Fundy, is the longest river in Eastern Canada at 418 miles. Follow the Fiddlehead Scenic Drive, which is prominently signposted (look for the green and white signs) and runs parallel to it through the St. John River Valley in spring. The drive is called for the many ferns that bloom along the streams and rivers in this area during this time of year. Make a pit stop at Grand Falls, where the river plunges 75 feet into a valley below.

  • At the Kings Landing Historical Settlement, you may try your hand at wool spinning or rug weaving.
  • There is a chapter of New Brunswick’s cross-cultural history revealed around every curve in the river—Maliseets and French, Acadians and English, Scottish and Irish—and they are all well worth reading.
  • Alternatively, as Paul Twyford, owner of the Celtic Fox Coffee House outside of Woodstock, describes it: “It’s like we’re back in the 1950s, when people took the time to get to know one another.” When to Go: When to Go: From June through September, the villages are at their most joyful.
  • The Harvest Jazz and Blues Festival in Fredericton is a highlight of the festival season.
  • The Best Way to Get Around: You can fly into Fredericton and rent a car, then drive north on Highway 2 for about an hour.

(Due to dams, it is not possible to paddle the entire length of St John.) A relaxing pontoon boat trip down the valley or, for a more adventurous experience, a zip line over the 75-foot-high Grand Falls, one of the country’s greatest waterfalls, can be found just outside the town of Grand Falls at the narrowest portion of the river.

  1. To get to surrounding restaurants, bars, and trails, take a walk or borrow one of the hotel’s guest bikes.
  2. What to Eat and Drink: Florenceville-Bristol is the sizzling core of French fry nation, with a plethora of restaurants serving up piping hot fries.
  3. There is a café in the Potato Worldmuseum that serves delicacies such as chocolate fudge potato cake, iced caramel fries, and other potato-themed treats.
  4. Farmers’ markets in towns like Woodstock (which is closed on Sundays) and Perth Andover (which is only open on Saturdays) are fantastic places to get jams, butters, sauces, and maple sweets from June through September.
  5. What to Bring: (look for signs).
  6. Recommended Reading Before You Go: Nights Below Station Street by David Adams Richards, by David Adams Richards (Emblem Editions, 2009).
  7. Links that may be of assistance: New Brunswick is a province in Canada.
  8. It’s a fun fact: Twice a day, the world’s highest tides, which may rise as high as 48 feet above low tide and advance from the Bay of Fundy, compel the St.

John River to flow in the opposite direction of its natural course. Vancouver-based Robin Esrock is the author of The Great Canadian Bucket List and the host of the National Geographic Adventure television seriesWord Travels. She lives in Toronto with her family.

Saint John River (Maine)

A tributary of the St. John River, known as the Baker Branch, begins its journey through Somerset County in northeastern Maine. Beginning at Little Saint John Lake near Saint-Zacharie, Quebec, and flowing northeasterly to join the Baker Branch in northern Somerset County, the Southwest Branch of the St. John River forms the international boundary between Maine and Quebec as it flows northeasterly to join the Baker Branch, which is located in northern Somerset County. In the southern Quebec border region, the Northwest Branch of the St.

River continues through New Brunswick, Canada until draining into the Atlantic Ocean at the Bay of Fundy, which is located near the city of St.

History

The lower river valley was a significant portion of the French colony of Acadia during its early years. During the 17th and 18th centuries, Acadian communities sprung up along the lower river, notably Fort La Tour (Saint John) and Pointe Sainte-Anne (Montreal) (Fredericton). During the French and Indian War in 1758, Colonel Robert Monckton launched the St. John River Campaign, in which the British burnt Acadian settlements along the river, forcing the residents to leave or taking them prisoner before deporting them.

  1. John River Campaign, the whole territory came under English authority, including the city of Fredericton (1759).
  2. The arrival of the Loyalists accelerated the process of establishing the new English colony of New Brunswick in Canada.
  3. Until the early- to mid-19th century, English settlers did not arrive in the lush Upper River Valley, despite its abundance of water.
  4. Upon their return from expulsion, Acadians established themselves in the Upper St.
  5. Francophone Quebecers arrived in the Madawaska region a little later, towards the middle of the nineteenth century, traveling southward via traditional portage routes from the Saint Lawrence River basin.
  6. Even now, the Madawaska region of the river valley has a significant francophone population.
  7. The high flow rate of the river and its tributaries during the spring freshet supported the growth of the wood industry in western New Brunswick, and the river was used as a conduit for log drives to saw and pulp mills in the southern province of New Brunswick.
  8. Spring freshet and ice break up at Westfield on the St.
  9. As a result of the expansion of logging and agricultural resources in the upper river valley region throughout the 1820s and 1830s, the area became increasingly economically significant.
  10. The Aroostook War erupted after the separate state and colonial militias were summoned to fight each other.
  11. During the nineteenth century, the St.

John River played a crucial role in the development of western New Brunswick’s agriculture. It functioned as the region’s primary transportation route, notably prior to the age of rail transportation, when paddle wheelers sailed its rivers to convey passengers and freight.

St. John River

It was the lower river valley that had a significant role in the French colony’s development. Fort La Tour (Saint John) and Pointe Sainte-Anne (Montreal) were two Acadian villages that sprang up along the lower river in the 17th and 18th centuries (Fredericton). During the French and Indian War in 1758, Colonel Robert Monckton launched the St. John River Campaign, in which the British burnt the Acadian settlements along the river, forcing the residents to leave or capturing them prisoner before deporting them to England.

John River Campaign, the whole territory came under English authority, including the city of Montreal (1759).

After arriving in New Brunswick, the Loyalists pushed for the establishment of a new English colony known as New Brunswick.

Until the early to mid-19th century, English settlers did not arrive in the abundant Upper River Valley’s lush lands.

Upon their return from expulsion, Acadians established themselves in the Upper St.

It was not until the mid-nineteenth century that francophone Quebecers began to colonize the Madawaska region, traveling southwards via traditional portage routes that originated in the Saint Lawrence River basin.

It is still mostly a French-speaking community in the Madawaska region of the river valley.

The high flow rate of the river and its tributaries during the spring freshet encouraged the growth of the wood industry in western New Brunswick, and the river was used as a conduit for log drives to saw and pulp mills in the southern province of Nova Scotia.

A spring freshet and ice break up on the St.

By the 1820s and 1830s, the upper river valley area had become increasingly economically significant as a result of the growth of logging and agricultural resources.

It was the mobilization of the separate state and colonial militias that led to the outbreak of the Aroostook War in 1812.

The St. John River had a significant role in the development of western New Brunswick throughout the nineteenth century. Paddle wheelers sailed the region’s rivers in the years before the advent of railroads, and it functioned as the region’s primary transit route during that time period.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *