Where Is Saint Andrews Golf Course

St. Andrews

Phone: (913) 890-1650, 11099 W. 135th Street, Overland Park, KS 66221 St. Andrews is the most popular 18-hole golf course in the Kansas City metro area, with over 60,000 visitors each year. Players like this tree-lined, Ozark-feeling course, which offers five sets of tees to challenge golfers of all skill levels, from novice to expert. Private and group instruction for adult and junior golfers are provided, as well as a variety of other special activities and events. Leagues for both social and competitive golfers are held on the course on a regular basis.

View the Scorecard for the Course View Photos of the Course: Front nine/rear nine A lit driving range with extended hours, chipping and putting greens, and a full-service pro shop specializing in name-brand equipment and apparel are all available at St.

On-site club fittings are provided by qualified professionals.

In addition to offering wedding and banquet facilities for parties of 25-250 people, the Highlands Room at St.

Curt Nelson, PGA Master Professional, is the General Manager of the company.

Because the St.

Tees Yards Par Men Rating Women Rating
Red 4160 71 N/A 64.3/103
Gold 4715 71 63.1/102 67.7/110
White 5598 71 66.9/119 71.0/119
Blue 5986 71 68.7/123 N/A
Black 6362 71 71.0/126 N/A

St Andrews Old Course History

Golf is played by more than 2 billion people throughout the world, and worldwide television coverage makes the world’s most prestigious events accessible to billions more people.

Six Centuries of Golf

Golf has been played on the Links at St Andrews since around 1400 AD, and the Old Course is often regarded as the “Home of Golf” across the globe. It gained popularity, and by the nineteenth century, it had become a way of life for many local people, whether they were players, caddies, ball manufacturers, or club builders, among other things. Today, golf continues to play an important role in the culture and economics of St Andrews. Following a 600-year evolution, a single route cut through the gorse and heather has grown into seven public golf courses that draw hundreds of thousands of golfing pilgrims from all over the world each year.

Golf Banned

As evidenced by the fact that golf was forbidden in 1457 by King James II of Scotland, who believed it was diverting young men away from archery practice, the game had certainly become too popular throughout the Middle Ages. Successive kings upheld the ban until James IV, in 1502, threw up the towel and took up golf as a recreational activity for himself.

The Royal and Ancient Golf Club

By 1457, King James II of Scotland had prohibited golf because he believed it was detracting young men from their archery training.

He believed the game had become too popular throughout the Middle Ages. James IV, the last king to impose a ban on golf, did so in 1502 and became a member of the Royal Golf Club of Great Britain.

From 22 to 18 Holes

As evidenced by the fact that golf was forbidden in 1457 by King James II of Scotland, who believed it was diverting young men away from archery practice, the game had certainly become too popular in the Middle Ages. Successive kings upheld the ban until James IV, in 1502, threw up the towel and took up golf as a hobby for himself.

Direction of Play

Due to the fact that Old Tom Morris built a separate green for the first hole, it became feasible to play the course in an anti-clockwise route rather than the traditional clockwise way, which was previously the usual. It used to be that players alternated between playing clockwise and anti-clockwise around the course every week; however, in recent years, the anti-clockwise, or right-hand circuit has become the recognized route. Many of the course’s 112 bunkers, on the other hand, are obviously intended to capture errant shots from players who are playing the course on the left-hand circuit, as seen by the placement of many of the bunkers.

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Double Greens

Due to the fact that Old Tom Morris built a separate green for the first hole, it became feasible to play the course in an anti-clockwise route rather than the traditional clockwise direction. It used to be that players alternated between playing clockwise and anti-clockwise around the course every week; however, in recent years, the anti-clockwise, or right-hand circuit has become the standard route. Although the course’s 112 bunkers are clearly intended to capture errant shots from players who play the course on the left-hand circuit, many of them are plainly meant to catch wayward shots from golfers who play on the right-hand circuit.

Rabbit Wars

A period of ‘temporary impecuniosity,’ that is, financial insolvency, occurred in 1797, when the Town Council of St Andrews lost complete control of the Links, allowing rabbit farming to compete golf for the top spot. Twenty years of legal and violent conflict between golfers and rabbit farmers came to an end in 1821 when James Cheape of Strathtyrum, a nearby landowner and avid golfer, purchased the area and, in his own words,’saved the Links for golf’.

A Championship Course

The Open Championship was originally contested on the Old Course at St Andrews in 1873, and it has been held there ever since. With the 29th staging of the world’s top golf event taking place on the Old Course in 2015, St Andrews has hosted the event more times than any other location in the globe. St Andrews has hosted a slew of professional and amateur competitions for men and women since 1985, including the Walker Cup, the Amateur Championship, and the Dunhill Links Championship. The Home of Golf has also hosted the Walker Cup, the Amateur Championship, and a host of other professional and amateur events for men and women.

The First Links Act

Following the passage of the first Links Act by Parliament in 1894, the Town Council of St Andrews re-acquired the Links, ensuring public access to the Links for both locals and visitors alike.

The Jubilee Course, which opened in 1897, and the Eden Course, which opened in 1914, were both built by the Council.

St Andrews Links Trust

In 1974, following the dissolution of the Town Council as a result of local government reform, the St Andrews Links Trust was established by another Act of Parliament to ensure that the Links would continue to operate as public golf courses available to the public. With the completion of the Strathtyrum Course in 1993, the number of 18-hole courses in the area increased to five, with one nine-hole course, the Balgove, rounding out the total. In 1993, a large golf practice facility was dedicated to the public.

This was followed in 2000 by the construction of a second clubhouse, the Eden Clubhouse, for use by players on the Eden, Strathtyrum, and Balgove Courses, resulting in the creation of the world’s biggest public golf complex.

  • To learn more about us, please visit our About page. Our team includes members of the Old Course History and Testimonials, as well as information about St Andrews’ dining options.

Your Experience

This popular activity has sparked a worldwide interest that has resulted in a multi-billion dollar business. The humble beginnings of this sport, which is adored by so many, can be traced back to a little spit of land off the east coast of Scotland. The town of St Andrews, where the common ground of the links was handed to the townspeople in a royal charter so that they might graze their sheep and capture rabbits for sustenance and pelts, is a good example of this. From a period when shepherds hit stones around the dunes as a rough amusement to a time when it became a recognized game with rules and on to its current position as a sporting passion, adored by millions and watched by millions more over the years, the land progressively transformed.

1574 St Andrews – The Student Golfer

It is also recorded that King James IV, who essentially removed the ‘ban’ on golf in 1502 by purchasing the first set of clubs fromPerth, spent money on golf clubs and balls in 1504, probably definitely atFalkland Palace, in order to play golf at St Andrews. During those days, the Royal Court travelled from palace to palace, and Falkland Palace was known as the’sporty’ palace of the Stuart era. Other golf-related expenses, like as golf clubs and balls, are recorded in 1506, when the King may have been inEdinburgh orStirling, respectively.

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The Charter reaffirmed the rights of the local community to utilize the links, including the right to play golf on the links at St Andrews, among other things.

As is the case everywhere in Scotland, there are records in the Kirk Sessions at St Andrews of offenders being brought to task for playing golf on the ‘golf fieldis’ on the Sabbath in the years 1583, 1598, and 1599.

(Sunday). However, the Kirk was actively promoting golf at the same time that they were prohibiting it. Many ministers had their training at St Andrews and learned to play golf there, which they then carried with them throughout Scotland.

Students of the Golf

A poem written in 1460 by Sir Gilbert Hay, a scholar and international traveller, is widely considered to be the first use of the word ‘golf’ by an individual writer. St Andrews University was founded in 1413, and one of its earliest graduates, Sir Gilbert Hay, scholar and international traveller, is widely considered to be the first use of the word ‘golf’ by an individual writer. According to the journals of James Melville, the earliest known student golfer at St Andrews dates back to around 1574, when a golf ‘club and balls’ are mentioned.

  • His father was a minister at Maryton, near Montrose, where he grew up and went to school, where he learned to play golf.
  • He was in town at the time when his uncle, Andrew Melville, delivered a sermon in which he denounced the Pryor’s self-indulgence, particularly the fact that he played golf, presumably to excess.
  • His son and grandson have just been identified as purchasers of golf equipment in Orkney, which is not surprising.
  • As a result, many aristocratic families sent their boys to St Andrews, where they learned golf and archery, as well as Latin and theological studies, among other things.
  • Several of these accounts have survived, and several of them contain golf-related things.
  • Although James Pett was identified as the source of his clubs, little information is provided as to whether or not he was a clubmaker or simply a distributor.
  • Francis Scott, the 2nd Earl of Buccleuch (1626-1651), and his brother David were also pupils at St Andrews in 1636-38, where they participated in golf and archery competitions.

Patrick saved money by purchasing in bulk from the ball manufacturer, Andrew Rynde, in quantities of 5 or 6 dozen at a time.

Golf clubs and balls were also purchased by the three sons of John Mackenzie, a lawyer who was also the Laird of Delvine in Perthshire during the period 1712 to 1715.

The students were not the only members of the university community that were out on the course.

In 1691, he sent a letter to John Mackenzie, in which he referred to St Andrews as the’metropolis of Golfing’.

As a part of the letter, Munro handed Mackenzie’a sett of Golfe-Clubs, which consisted of three clubs: ‘an play club, ane Scrapper, and ane tin fac’d club,’ according to the letter.

A driving wood, a lofting wood, and an iron club would have been included in this set.

When compared to Perth, this might indicate a more plentiful supply of clubs and balls in the area.

c1753 – George Milne was a well-known golf-ball manufacturer, while Henry Miln was a club-maker who passed away in 1755.

They had been paying Peter McEwan for more than a decade to go from Bruntsfield to Edinburgh, and they had been doing so for years.

The Development of the Old Course

By 1754, the course at St Andrews was comprised of twelve holes, ten of which were played twice, for a total of twenty-two holes in a game of golf. The course winds its way ‘out’ along the shore before turning back ‘in’ to the clubhouse for the final stretch. The rules for participating in the inaugural tournament there included references to several of the Old Course holes that are still in play today on the course. The final victor over this design was William St Clair of Roslin, who then served as Captain, and he was the one who authorized the layout’s modifications.

Andrews.

As a result, they have agreed that they will be played that two holes in the future, in the same manner as they are currently laid out.

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ST.

Clair) ‘Captain and Gentlemen Golfers present’ of the club now known as The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews determined that the first four holes, which were also the last four holes, were too short and converted them into two holes to be played ‘in the same way as currently marked out,’ resulting in the creation of an eighteen-hole golf course.

  1. William St Clair of Roslin was captain of the St Andrews team three times and captain of the Leith team four times.
  2. A result of the Town Council’s financial troubles, the links were sold in 1799 to professional rabbit breeders Charles and Cathcart Dempster.
  3. The ‘Rabbit Wars’ raged on the courses and in the courts for sixteen years until, in 1821, James Cheape of Strathtyrum purchased the links for the golfers and created the groundwork for the city’s future golfing prosperity.
  4. St.
  5. The construction of the current Royal & Ancient clubhouse, which is visible in the photograph with snow on the eighteenth hole, began in 1854.
  6. Golf tourism spread throughout the United Kingdom as a result of the rising affluence of the Victorian era and the growth of the railway system.
  7. Other courses were added shortly after.
  8. Old Tom was a native of St Andrew’s who had trained under another renowned St Andrew’s golfer, Allan Robertson, before moving on to Preston to take up the position of Keeper of the Green.
  9. Many people believe that Old Tom was responsible for the development of the groomed courses that we see today.
  10. Following that, James Cheape sold the Links in 1893 to the Royal and Ancient Club, which bid £5000 for the property, which was £500 more than the Town Council’s proposal.

The Council, on the other hand, was successful in its plea to Parliament to maintain the Links in common ownership. After many Acts of Parliament, the Links was eventually taken over by the Links Trust, which continues to operate it today.

St Andrews Links

There are now additional courses available on the Links. As part of its celebration of Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee, the Royal and Ancient Golf Club constructed the New Course in 1895, which was designed by Old Tom Morris, as well as the Jubilee course, which debuted with 12 holes in 1897 and was named in honor of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee that year. In 1905, the course was expanded to include 18 holes. The Eden Course debuted in 1914, while the Strathtyrum Golf Course opened in 1993. The nine-hole Balgrove course, which is geared at novices and children, was originally built in 1972, but it had a significant makeover in 1993, when the Strathtyrum was completed and reopened.

The St Andrews Links Trust owns and operates all six public Links courses in the city of St Andrews, including the Old Course.

The St Andrews Golf Club (founded in 1843) and The New Golf Club St Andrews (1902) for men, as well as the St Rule Club (1896) and St Regulus Ladies Golf Club (1913) for women, all have clubhouses overlooking the courses, in addition to the Royal and Ancient.

History of Saint Andrews Links: The Home of Golf

Other courses are now available on the Links. As part of its celebration of Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee, the Royal and Ancient Golf Club constructed the New Course in 1895, which was designed by Old Tom Morris, as well as the Jubilee course, which opened with 12 holes in 1897 and was named in honour of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee that year. After a few years, the course was expanded to 18 holes. This course, as well as the Strathtyrum Course, first opened its doors in 1914. Although it was originally constructed for novices and children in 1972, the nine-hole Balgrove course underwent a significant redesign in 1993, following the completion of the Strathtyrum.

The St Andrews Links Trust owns and operates all six public Links courses in the city, including the Old Course.

The St Andrews Golf Club (founded in 1843) and The New Golf Club St Andrews (1902) for men, as well as the St Rule Club (1896) and St Regulus Ladies Golf Club (1913) for women, all have clubhouses with views of the links, in addition to the Royal and Ancient.

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