When Was Saint Benedict Born

Saint Benedict

Frequently Asked Questions

Who was St. Benedict?

Some of the most common inquiries

Life

In terms of the facts of Benedict’s life, the sole authoritative source is Book 2 of theDialoguesofSt. Gregory I, who claimed to have gotten his knowledge from four of Benedict’s pupils. Despite the fact that Gregory’s book contains several miracles and signs, his summary of Benedict’s life can be taken as factual. He does not provide any specific dates, though. Benedict was born into a well-to-do family and was put to Roman schools by his parents. In the course of his life, he lived through the decades during which the decaying imperial metropolis was transformed into the Rome of the Medieval Papal State.

When the Gothic kingTotila sacked and expelled the inhabitants of Rome in 546, and when the EmperorJustinian Its attempt to reconquer and holdItaly failed, the papacy stepped in to fill the administrative void, and the papacy soon became the sovereign power of a small Italian dominion that was virtually independent of the Eastern Empire.

  • Benedict of Nursia is a saint who lived in Nursia, Italy.
  • Benedict of Nursia.
  • As a young man, he fled to Enfide (modern Affile) in the Simbruinian hills, and subsequently to a cave in the rocks alongside a lake that existed near the remains of Nero’s palace above Subiaco, 64 kilometers (40 miles) east of Rome in the foothills of the Abruzzi mountains.
  • When word of Benedict’s piety began to spread, he was persuaded to accept the position of abbot of one of these monasteries.
  • He returned to his cave, but students came to him once more, and he established 12 monasteries, each with 12 monks, with himself as the supreme authority over all of them.
  • Later, he was driven from the region by the machinations of a neighboring priest, yet the 12 monasteries remained in operation to this day.
  • The territory was still primarily paganic at the time of his preaching, but the people were converted as a result of it.
  • The single event in Benedict’s life that can be pinpointed is a visit by the Gothic ruler Totila in the year 542.
  • The Rule, as Gregory points out, is the best place to learn about Benedict’s personality, because the impression left by the Rule is of a wise and mature saint, authoritative yet fatherly, and firm but caring.

A spiritual master, who has personally found peace in the acceptance of Christ, is well-suited and accustomed to ruling and guiding others in their spiritual journey.

Rule of St. Benedict

In terms of the facts of Benedict’s life, the sole authoritative source is Book 2 of theDialoguesofSt. Gregory I, who claimed to have gotten his knowledge from four of Benedict’s followers. Despite the fact that Gregory’s work contains several miracles and signs, his summary of Benedict’s life may be recognized as historically accurate. Although he does not provide a specific date, As the son of well-off parents, Benedict was sent to the Roman school system by his parents. In the course of his life, he lived through the decades during which the decaying imperial metropolis was transformed into the Rome of the Medieval Papal States.

  • During the Gothic invasion of Italy in 546, the city of Rome was sacked and its inhabitants were expelled.
  • St.
  • The abbey at Münsterschwarzach, Germany, has a stone sculpture of St.
  • This connection between the monasticism of the East and the start of a new era was made possible by Immanuel GielBenedict.
  • Romanus, a monk from one of the various monasteries in the area, provided him with food and monastic clothing throughout his three-year sojourn there.
  • An effort was attempted to poison him in order to quell his reformist enthusiasm, but it was unsuccessful.
  • A number of patrician and senator families in Rome gave their kids to be trained as monks under his supervision, and it was from these novices that two of his most well-known followers, Maurus and Placid, were raised.
  • Some of Benedict’s pupils accompanied him south, where he settled on the summit of a hill rising sharply above Cassino, about midway between Rome and Naples, to begin his work.
  • In the same year, his sister Scholastica, who had relocated nearby to serve as the head of a nunnery, died.
  • Benedict’s feast day is observed by monks on March 21, which is the traditional anniversary of his death, and by the Roman Catholic Church in Europe on July 11th.

A spiritual master, who has personally found peace in the acceptance of Christ, is well-suited and used to ruling and guiding others in the same way.

Who is Saint Benedict? — Saint Benedict Church

For the details of Benedict’s life, the only authoritative source is book 2 of theDialoguesofSt. Gregory I, who claimed to have gotten his knowledge from four of Benedict’s pupils. Despite the fact that Gregory’s work contains several miracles and signs, his summary of Benedict’s life may be recognized as historically accurate. He does not, however, provide any dates. Benedict was born into a well-to-do household and was sent to Romanschools by his parents. His life encompassed the decades during which the decaying imperial metropolis was transformed into the Rome of the Medieval Papal States.

When the Gothic kingTotila sacked and expelled the inhabitants of Rome in 546, and when the EmperorJustinian Its attempt to reconquer and holdItaly failed, the papacy stepped in to fill the administrative void and soon after became the sovereign power of a small Italian dominion that was virtually independent of the Eastern Empire.

Benedict of Nursia is a saint from Nursia, Italy.

Benedict of Nursia depicting the saint.

Astonished by the licentiousness of Rome, he retreated as a young man to Enfide (modern Affile) in the Simbruinian hills and then to a cave in the rocks alongside the lake that existed near the remains ofNero’spalace above Subiaco, 64 kilometers (40 miles) east of Rome in the foothills of the Abruzzi.

  • When word of Benedict’s piety spread, he was persuaded to accept the position of abbot of one of these monasteries.
  • He returned to his cave, but students came to him once more, and he established 12 monasteries, each with 12 monks, with himself as the supreme authority over them all.
  • Later, he was driven from the region by the machinations of a neighboring priest, but the 12 monasteries remained in operation.
  • The territory was still primarily paganic at the time of his preaching, but the people were converted as a result of his efforts.
  • The only date that can be pinpointed in Benedict’s life is a visit by the Gothic ruler Totila in the year 542.
  • The Rule, as Gregory points out, must be read in order to understand Benedict’s personality, and the impression left by it is of a wise and mature saint, authoritative yet fatherly, and stern but caring.

It is the voice of a spiritual master, one who is well-suited and used to ruling and guiding others, having found his own peace in accepting Christ.

Early Life — Norcia

Saint Benedict was born in the city of Norcia about the year 480 AD. That historical period, which ended only four years before the deposition of the final Emperor, Romulus Augustulus, signaled the end of the Western Roman Empire as we know it, was extremely difficult to navigate. According to tradition, the sole true life of Saint Benedict is given in the second book of Pope Saint Gregory’s Dialogues, which was presumably composed in the period of 593-594 AD. Following his elementary schooling in Norcia, Benedict moved to Rome to further his education in literature and law, among other things.

  1. At Affile, Saint Benedict performed his first miracle, restoring to perfect condition a ceramic wheat sifter that had been accidently damaged by a man-servant on his property.
  2. He found refuge in a cave among the remains of Nero’s town, near Subiaco, where he proceeded to live as a hermit for the rest of his days and nights.
  3. He was completely isolated and had no way to communicate with anybody else.
  4. After then, it was three years of solitude.
  5. They began to adhere to his teachings, and the pastoral and apostolic ideals of the Benedictine Order began to take root in their hearts.

Founding Monasteries — Subiaco

After overcoming a powerful temptation to abandon his vow of chastity, Benedict prepared himself to go through a new experience, following in the footsteps of the ancient Fathers of Christian Monasticism in the process. His arrival at Vicovaro was first welcomed by the monastic community, but a botched effort by a monk to poison him prompted Benedict to return to his solitary. Afterwards, he established twelve monasteries and assigned a total of twelve monks to each of them. A thirteenth monastery, for novices and people in need of instruction, was also established by the monk.

  1. They would go on to become the first two jewels in the crown of the Benedictine family.
  2. He discovered water on a lonely mountainside to relieve the thirst of his monks, and brought it back to the monastery.
  3. A monk’s dissolute life was averted by his involvement on the monastic grounds.
  4. Unfortunately, a priest named Florentius was jealous of Benedict’s success, and as a result of his jealousy, the Saint was compelled to leave his monastery, despite the protests of his pupils.
  5. He built the Abbey of Montecassino between 525 and 529 AD, during the time period of the Roman Empire.
  6. Under Benedict’s guidance, the ancient acropolis-sanctuary that towered above the waning Roman municipium of Casinum was transformed into a monastery that was far larger than those constructed at Subiaco and other nearby sites.

His construction of a chapel dedicated to Saint John the Baptist on the ruins of the altar of Apollo, while the temple of Apollo itself was transformed into an oratory for monks dedicated to Saint Martin of Tours, was a triumph of Christian architecture.

Monastic Life Takes Root — Montecassino

The ancient Fathers of Christian Monasticism provided Benedict with a model for living through a new experience after he had successfully resisted a powerful temptation against chastity. His arrival at Vicovaro was first welcomed by the monastic community, but a botched effort by a monk to poison Benedict drove him to return to his solitary. Afterwards, he established twelve monasteries and assigned a total of twelve monks to each one. A thirteenth monastery, for novices and people in need of instruction, was also established by him.

  1. They were to go on to become the first two jewels of the Benedictine family’s crowning achievement.
  2. A lonely mountainside provided him with water, which he used to assuage the thirst of his monks.
  3. A monk’s dissolute life was averted by his involvement on the monastic life.
  4. A priest named Florentius, however, had a secret admiration for Benedict’s fame, and his jealousy caused the Saint to abandon his mission, despite the protests of his pupils.
  5. The Abbey of Montecassino was founded by him sometime between the years 525 and 529.
  6. A monastery was erected on the site of an ancient Roman acropolis-sanctuary that formerly towered above the decaying Roman municipium of Casinum, under the leadership of Benedict, that was far larger than the monastery established at Subiaco.

St. Benedict – Saints & Angels

A Roman nobleman from Norcia, St. Benedict is thought to have been born about the year 480 as the son of a Roman nobleman from Norcia and the twin brother of his sister, Scholastica. When Benedict was a teenager in the fifth century, he was transported to Rome to complete his education under the supervision of a nurse/housekeeper. The subject of rhetoric – the skill of persuading others – was the focus of a young man’s academic pursuits at the time. A successful speaker was not always the one who had the greatest argument or the most accurate message, but rather the one who employed rhythm, eloquence, and skill to persuade.

  1. Moreover, that concept was represented in the daily lives of the students themselves.
  2. Benedict watched in horror as vice tore apart the lives and morals of his comrades and he cried out for help.
  3. The mountains of Subiaco were the place where he went when God urged him to go beyond this calm existence and into even greater seclusion.
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  5. We know it’s a little embarrassing to ask, but we really need your assistance.
  6. We are not salespeople, but we rely on donations, which average $14.76 and are made by less than one percent of our readers each month.
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Benedict was living as a hermit in a cave above a lake when the Devil appeared to him one day and presented him with a beautiful, seductive lady to captivate his imagination.

It is stated that via his physical wounds, he was able to heal the scars in his spirit.

In spite of his warnings, they insisted on him being too harsh for them, and when his warnings proved correct, they attempted to poison him.

As a result, Benedict was back on his own – but only for a short time.

Because of the jealous assaults of another hermit, he was forced to leave these monasteries abruptly, making it difficult for him to continue in the spiritual leadership role he had assumed.

His followers were not divided into little groups; rather, they were grouped into a single larger community under his leadership.

After over 1,500 years of monastic history, his course appears to us to be self-explanatory.

No one had ever established communities like his before, nor had anybody ever directed them with a set of rules.

Benedict possessed the necessary holiness and competence to take this step.

Benedict used what he had learned about the power of speech and the rhythms of oratory to the service of the Gospel in this brief but powerful Rule of St.

He did not drop out of school because he was unable to comprehend the subject material.

Despite his previous schooling, he saw that rhetoric was just as much of a tool as a hammer or a nail.

Rhetoric may be used to promote vice, or it can be used to promote God.

Benedict did not want to lose his ability to raise his voice in prayer to God merely because others had used it to drop to the depths of the sewers.

Let us join together in singing so that our hearts and voices are in perfect harmony.” There was always a voice reading aloud in his villages during meals, to greet guests, to instruct novices.

Benedict used the psalms as a source of inspiration for prayer, because they were the melodies and poetry from the Jewish liturgy that Jesus himself had chanted.

“As soon as the signal for the Divine Office is received, all work will come to a complete stop.” Benedict shared Jesus’ belief that “one does not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceeds from the mouth of God.” 4:4 (Matthew 4:17).

As part of the Work of God, Benedict ordered his disciples to engage in holy reading – the study of the exact Scriptures from which they would be praying.

For this spiritual reading, four to six hours were set up each day, on average.

Lessons from Scripture were to be delivered orally from memory rather than being read from a book.

Despite the fact that Benedict had ordered that the oil be delivered, the cellarer objected since there was just a little amount of oil remaining.

Benedict knelt down to pray, enraged by the lack of faith in God’s providence on his part.

Astonished, the monks stood by and watched as the oil from God poured into the vessel to the point that it overflowed, spilled out beneath the lid, and ultimately pulled the top off, allowing the oil to cascade down onto the floor.

All that is left is for us to put our faith in God’s provision to fill us.

Benedict died on March 21, 543, not long after his sister, who had died the day before.

He is the patron saint of Europe, as well as of students and scholars. St. Benedict is frequently shown with a bell, a broken dish, a raven, or a crosier, among other things. His feast day is commemorated on the 11th of July each year.

Life of St. Benedict

St. Benedict of NursiaOra et Labora(Pray and Work)St. Benedict of Nursia (ca. 480 – ca. 547) profoundlyimpacted the life of the Church in the West.Asthe founder of Western monasticism, his Rule has beenthe model for most religious orders founded over thelast 1500 years.He is the patron saint of Europe(declared by Pope Paul VI in 1964, declared co-patronwith Saints Cyril and Methodius by John Paul II in 1980)as well as the patron of monks, speleologists (the studyof caves), farmworkers and victims of poisoning.St. Benedict was born at Nursia, a small town nearSpoleto in central Italy.He is known to be thetwin brother to St. Scholastica.Their mother diedat their birth.St. Scholastica and St. Benedictdeveloped a close relationship early in life that lastedthroughout their lives.His parents were wealthy landowners(but not part of the aristocracy).St. Benedictwas sent to Rome to study around 500a.d. but decided todrop out after he was distressed by the immorality ofthe Roman culture and the lackadaisical attitude of hisfellow students.He then headed south to themountains.There he met a monk named Romanus whoshowed him a cave where he could live as a hermit in thearea called Subiaco, which had a spectacular view of themountain gorge.Romanus, sensing the specialnessand holiness of St. Benedict, brought food to St.Benedict every day by lowering it in a basket from theedge of the cliff.A bell at the end of the ropewould indicate to St. Benedict that his meal hadarrived.He lived like this for about three years.One day, nearby shepherds stumbledupon his cave.At first, they were frightened bythe site of St. Benedict (who dressed in animal skinsand looked more like a wild man than a monk).Asthey began to speak with St. Benedict, they realizedthey had found a saint.So they began a reciprocalrelationship… the shepherds brought him food and hetaught them about the faith.St. Benedict’s reputation forsanctity spread throughout the region and men who wantedto pursue the religious life flocked to him.Heorganized them into twelve communities of ten monks eachand an abbot.He stayed there for abouttwenty-five years, as roman nobles would send their sonsto St. Benedict to be educated.Among the firstwere Saints Maurus and Placid, who came as young boysand stayed on to become two of St. Benedict’s mostfaithful disciples.During these twenty-five years thathe stayed in Subiaco, he met resistance regarding thestrict regime he required of the communities.Thesuccess of his communities brought about envy andjealously, at least with one priest named Florentius.Florentius was known to spread lies about St. Benedict,though no one believed him.He tried to keep menfrom joining St. Benedict, but men kept coming.Itwas said that Florentius even tried to poison a loaf ofbread and deliver it to St. Benedict, begging him toaccept it as a token of remorse.By the grace ofGod, St. Benedict realized the bread was poisoned.He was said to have given it to a raven, commanding theraven to take the bread to a place where no one wouldfind it.In a final effort to ruin St. Benedict’sreputation, Florentius hired prostitutes in vain, hoping itwould seduce the monks.Realizing that Florentius wouldnever stop his attacks on the community, St. Benedictmoved his monks to Monte Cassino, in the imposingmountains of the central Apennines in Italy.They builta new monastery on the summit, converting an old templeof Apollo into a chapel dedicated to St. Martin.His sister, St. Scholastica, established a community ofnuns nearby, and they would meet half-way in betweenonce a year to break bread and discuss spiritualinsights.It was at Mount Cassino where he wrote thefinal version of his Rule (of life) (known as the Ruleof St. Benedict).Drawing ideas from monasticwriters such as Saints Basil, John Cassian, Augustine,the Desert Fathers, Pachomius in Egypt and theRegulaMagistri(“ Rule of the Master ”), he developed his Ruleto assist the monks to grow in holiness and to live incommunity.TheRule of Benedicthe wrote for hismonks was in part a reaction against the extremespracticed by some monks, particular those who lived inthe deserts of the East.Left to their owndevices, these monks, almost all of whom lived ashermits, would literally torture their bodies bydepriving themselves of sleep, food and water.St.Benedict’s response was to develop a method that waspractical, made no irrational demands of the body andcould be flexible without compromising its spiritualprinciples.It was designed as a different way toachieve holiness and connection to God.The ruleis divided into 73 short chapters, which focus on threemain themes:Stability, Obedience and Conversionin Life.St. Benedict never became a priest,nor did he intend to form a new religious order.However, his Rule and his spirituality not onlyinfluenced the growth of Western monasticism, but ofWestern civilization itself.He was able toinfluence/shape a culture that he once found to bedespicable.He died on March 21 (ca. 547) and isburied in the Oratory of St. John the Baptist at Cassinoalongside his sister, St. Scholastica.Hismonastery in Mount Cassino was destroyed by the Lombards(ca. 577).St. Benedict’s Rule was followed inFrance, England and Germany by the seventh and eighthcenturies.When the emperor Charlemagne (ca.742-814) initiated a reform of monasticism, he chose theRule of St. Benedict as his model.His son andsuccessor, Louis the Pious imposed it on all monasterieswithin the empire.His motto is “Ora et Labora”which means “Pray and Work.”We celebrate hisfeast day on July 11.Resources on St. BenedictCraughwell, Thomas J.Saints for Every Occasion:101 of Heaven’s Most Powerful Patrons.Charlotte,NC:C.D. Stampley Enterprises, Inc., 2001.Delaney, John J.Dictionary of Saints.Garden City, NY:DoubledayCompany, Inc., 1980.Derkse, Wil.The Rule of Benedict for Beginners:Spirituality for Daily Life.Collegeville, MN:Liturgical Press, 2003.McBrien, Richard P.Lives of the Saints:from Mary and St. Francis of Assisi to John XXIII andMother Teresa.San Francisco, CA:HarperSanFrancisco (Division of HarperCollinsPublishers), 2001.St. Benedict of Nursia.The Rule of SaintBenedict:A Contemporary Paraphrase.Paraphrased by Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove.Brewster, MA:Paraclete Press, 2012.St. Benedict of Nursia.The Rule of SaintBenedict.Edited by David W. Cotter, OSB.Translated by Leonard J. Doyle.Collegeville, MN:Liturgical Press, 2001.Walsh, Michael, ed.Butler’s Lives of the Saints.Concise Edition.New York, NY:HarperRowPublishers, 1985.

St. Benedict

A Roman nobleman from Norcia, St. Benedict is thought to have been born about the year 480 as the son of a Roman nobleman from Norcia and the twin brother of Scholastica. When Benedict was a teenager in the fifth century, he was transferred to Rome to continue his education under the supervision of a nurse/housekeeper. Rhetoric, or the art of persuading others, was the topic that dominated a young man’s academic life at the time. Rather than having the best argument or conveying reality, a good speaker was one who employed rhythm, eloquence, and skill to persuade the audience.

  1. Moreover, that attitude was represented in the daily lives of the students in attendance.
  2. Vice tore apart the lives and morals of Benedict’s friends, and he watched in horror as it did.
  3. The mountains of Subiaco were the place where he went when God beckoned him to go beyond his quiet existence and into even greater seclusion.
  4. Salutation to all of you.
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Benedict resisted by wrapping his body around a thorn shrub, causing scratches all over his body.

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As a result of his sanctity spreading over the area, surrounding monks approached him to seek for his leadership.

Although he told them that he would be too harsh for them, they insisted on it – and then attempted to poison him when his warning proved to be correct.

After a second group of followers who were more earnest, he established twelve monasteries in Subiaco, where monks lived in independent communities of twelve each.

He thus departed these monasteries abruptly.

His followers were not divided into little groups; instead, they were assembled into one large group.

Our understanding of his guidance is based on over 1500 years of monastic tradition.

Nothing like his communities had ever existed before, nor had anybody ever tried to control them with a rule like his.

In order to take this step, Benedict possessed the necessary holiness and aptitude.

Benedict used what he had learned about the power of speech and the rhythms of oratory to the service of the Gospel in this brief but powerful Rule of St.

He did not drop out of school because he was unable to comprehend the subject material!

Contrary to what he learned in school, he realized that rhetoric was just as important an instrument to be used as any other.

To promote vice or to promote God, rhetoric may be utilized in a variety of ways.

In order to avoid losing the ability to reach up to God, Benedict did not want to give up his voice merely because others had used it to drop to the bottom of the pit.

Come together in chanting so that our emotions and voices are in one with one another.” In his communities, there was always a voice reading aloud at meals, to welcome guests, and to educate newcomers, among other things.

Benedict realized that the Word of God was the strongest and most reliable foundation for the power of words: “For what page or word of the Bible does not contain a perfect rule for temporal life?” he wondered.

(Isaiah 55:10-11).

Benedict considered it to be so vital that he referred to it as the “Work of God” to combine our voices with Jesus’ in praise of God throughout the day.

Every piece of labor will come to a halt as soon as the signal for the Divine Office is received.

As part of the Work of God, Benedict ordered his disciples to engage in holy reading – the study of the exact Scriptures from which they would be praying.

On a daily basis, between four and six hours were allotted for this sacred reading.

Rather of reading from a book, Bible lessons were to be delivered orally from memory.

Benedict had ordered that the oil be delivered, but because there was just a little amount of oil remaining, the cellarer refused to comply.

Benedict knelt to pray, enraged by this lack of faith in God’s providence.

Astonished, the monks stood by and watched as the oil from God poured into the vessel to the point that it overflowed, spilled out beneath the lid, and ultimately pulled the top off, allowing the oil to spill out onto the floor.

God’s providence will infuse us with confidence, and that is all that is needed.

Not long after his sister, Benedict died on the 21st of March in 543.

They say he died of a high fever on the day God had said he would die. Europeans and students revere him as their patron saint. A bell, a broken plate, a raven, or a crosier are all common depictions of St. Benedict. July 11 is the day set aside to commemorate his death and resurrection.

The Hermit

A Roman nobleman from Norcia, St. Benedict is thought to have been born about the year 480 as the son of a nobleman from Norcia and the twin brother of his sister, Scholastica. When Benedict was a teenager in the fifth century, he was sent to Rome to pursue his education with the help of a nurse/housekeeper. The topic of rhetoric – the skill of persuading others – was the focus of a young man’s studies at the time. Rather than having the greatest argument or conveying the facts, a good speaker was one who employed rhythm, eloquence, and skill to persuade the audience.

  1. And that idea was reflected in the lives of the pupils as well.
  2. Benedict stood by helplessly while vice tore apart the lives and morals of his associates.
  3. The mountains of Subiaco were the place where he went when God urged him to go beyond this calm existence and into even deeper seclusion.
  4. Hello, dear readers.
  5. We realize it’s a little embarrassing to ask, but we really need your assistance.
  6. We are not salespeople, but we rely on donations, which average $14.76 and are made by less than one percent of our readers.
  7. Thank you very much.

Benedict was living as a hermit in a cave above a lake when the Devil presented him with a lovely, seductive lady in his thoughts.

It is stated that via his physical wounds, he was able to heal the scars of his spirit.

Although he told them that he would be too harsh for them, they insisted on it – and then attempted to poison him when his warning proved to be correct.

As a result, Benedict was back on his own – but only for a little while.

Because of the jealous assaults of another hermit, he was forced to leave these monasteries abruptly, making it difficult for him to maintain the spiritual leadership role he had assumed.

Instead of forming local, independent groups, Jesus assembled all of his disciples into a single large group.

After over 1,500 years of monastic history, his course appears to be self-evident to us.

No one had ever established societies like his or controlled them with a rule before him.

Benedict possessed both the holiness and the competence to take this initiative.

Benedict used what he had learnt about the power of speech and the rhythms of oratory to the service of the Gospel in this brief but powerful Rule.

Researchers have stated that his Rule demonstrates an awareness of and proficiency with the rhetorical rules of the historical period.

A hammer may be used to build a home or to beat someone over the head with a baseball bat.

Benedict did not reject speech because it had been used to persuade people to commit sin; rather, he corrected rhetoric.

He brought it to our attention “Consider where we are in the eyes of God and his angels.

‘We hope for this Rule to be read regularly in the community,’ we said after hearing the words only one time.

The power of God’s word, as expressed in Scripture, had been demonstrated to him: “For just as the rain and snow come down from the heavens and do not return there until they have watered the earth, making it fertile and fruitful, giving seed to those who sow and bread to those who eat, so shall my word be that goes forth from my mouth; it shall not return to me void, but shall accomplish what I purposed it to do” (Isaiah 55:10-11).

  1. Benedict used the psalms for prayer, the melodies and poetry from the Jewish liturgy that Jesus himself had chanted, as a model for his own prayer.
  2. “As soon as the signal for the Divine Office is received, all work will be suspended.” Benedict shared Jesus’ belief that “one does not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes forth from the mouth of God.” 4:4 (Matthew 4:4) It wasn’t enough, though, to just say the words.
  3. It was at this time that he and his monks learned, pondered, and examined the Scriptures until they became a part of their very existence.
  4. If monks had any spare time, it “should be put to good use by the brothers in the practice of psalms.” Lessons from Scripture were to be delivered verbatim from memory rather being read from a book.
  5. Despite Benedict’s orders, the cellarer refused to hand over the oil because there was just a little amount of oil remaining.
  6. Benedict knelt down to pray, enraged by this lack of faith in God’s providence.
  7. The monks gazed in awe as the oil from God filled the vessel to the point that it overflowed, spilled out beneath the lid, and ultimately pulled the top off, allowing the oil to cascade down into the floor below.
  8. God’s providence will inspire us with confidence, and that is all that is left.
  9. Benedict died on March 21, 543, not long after his sister, who had died the previous month.

He is the patron saint of Europe, as well as of students and university students. St. Benedict is frequently shown with a bell, a broken platter, a raven, or a crosier in his hands. His feast day is commemorated on the 11th of July.

Monte Cassino

Benedict, on the other hand, was not doomed to isolation; shortly after, other men flocked around him, and he established 12 monasteries, each with 12 monks and an abbot. They met in the chapel at regular intervals, under the leadership of Benedict, to recite psalms and pray silently. In 529, Benedict and his community relocated to Monte Cassino, a mountaintop 75 miles southeast of Rome that served as a retreat. He and his monks dismantled an ancient temple of Apollo on the peak, which was replaced by a chapel dedicated to St.

The daily life of Benedict at Monte Cassino is impossible to reconstruct; his chronicler was only concerned with relating the marvels, such as Benedict’s detection of an impostor who Totila, King of the Ostrogoths, had sent to the monastery in his place, and Benedict’s prediction of the destruction of Monte Cassino, which occurred in 589 as predicted by Benedict.

It is believed that he was buried with his sister St.

Benedictine Rule

Although Benedict was first alone, other men eventually rallied around him, and he established 12 monasteries with 12 monks and an abbot in each of the 12 monasteries. The entire community assembled in the chapel on a regular basis, under the guidance of Benedict, to sing psalms and pray silently. Approximately 529, Benedict relocated his community from Rome to Monte Cassino, a peak 75 miles southeast of the city center. In addition to demolish an old temple of Apollo on the peak and replace it with a chapel dedicated to St.

The daily life of Benedict at Monte Cassino is impossible to reconstruct; his chronicler was only concerned with relating the marvels, such as Benedict’s detection of an impostor who Totila, King of the Ostrogoths, had sent to the monastery in his place, and Benedict’s prediction of the destruction of Monte Cassino, which occurred in 589 as a result of an earthquake.

Saint Scholastica, his sister, was buried with him at Monte Cassino.

Further Reading on St. Benedict

Odo The narrative of St. Gregory is found in The Fathers of the Church: Saint Gregory the Great, Dialogues, vol. 39, which was translated by John Zimmerman (new trans. 1959). It is possible to find the Ruleof St. Benedict in Owen Chadwick’s book, Western Asceticism (1958). Saint Benedict(1960; trans. 1961), by Leonard von Matt and Stephen Hilpisch, is a restrained depiction of the historical figure with great images of the historical places. Longer discussions may be found in Justin McCann’s Saint Benedict (1937) and T.

Lindsay’s St.

Bernard of Clairvaux’s achievement is set in context by Herbert B.

1927).

Additional Biography Sources

Professor Eric Dean’s St.

Benedict for the Laity was published in Collegeville, Minnesota, by the Liturgical Press in 1989. Saint Benedict is blessed by God, by Guy Marie Oury, Collegeville, Minn.: Liturgical Press, 1980. St. Benedict is blessed by God.

Saint Benedict of Nursia by Abbot Primate Jerome Theisen OSB. Life, biography, introduction.

In the words of +Abbot PrimateJerome Theisen OSB (1930-1995). In 1964, on the occasion of the rededication of the reconstructed monastery of Monte Cassino, Pope Paul VI designated St. Benedict as the chief, heavenly patron of the entire European continent. Despite the fact that the title piously exaggerates Benedict’s position, it is, in many ways, accurate. While St. Benedict did not create the monastery of Monte Cassino in order to preserve the learning of the centuries, the monasteries that later followed his Rule did serve as repositories of knowledge and manuscripts for the benefit of future generations.

  1. Because he lived between two and a half and three centuries after the origins of Christian monasticism in Egypt, Palestine, and Asia Minor, Saint Benedict is not considered the founder of the movement.
  2. He became entangled in the monastic movement, yet he emerged with the ability to harness the current in new and constructive directions.
  3. Tradition holds that St.
  4. Although St.
  5. However, scholars are divided on the exact date of the Rule’s composition, while they appear to agree that it was composed in the second part of the sixth century.
  6. Gregory wrote about St.
  7. Gregory’s goal in writing about Benedict’s life was to edify and encourage people, rather than to record the specifics of his daily activities.
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Benedict, were still active in the Christian Church, despite the political and theological turmoil that existed in the world at the time of his writing.

According to Gregory’s Dialogues, Benedict was born in Nursia, a small town northeast of Rome located high in the highlands.

Therefore, he escaped to Subiaco, a town southeast of Rome where he spent three years as a hermit under the care of the monk Romanus, who was a close friend of the family.

His tyranny gradually became too much for the lukewarm monks, and they conspired to assassinate him as a result.

After that, Jesus abandoned the monks who were not disciplined.

Later, presumably in 529, he relocated to Monte Cassino, some eighty miles south-east of Rome, where he demolished a pagan temple dedicated to Apollo and established his most important monastic foundation.

The Second Book of Dialoguescontain descriptions of Benedict’s life and miracles, which are divided into thirty-eight brief chapters.

The miraculous stories are based on the occurrences of some prophets of Israel as well as incidents that occurred during the lifetime of Jesus Christ.

Benedictis is regarded as a monastic leader rather than a scholar in his own right.

The Rule of St.

Benedictas is presented by Gregory as an example of a saint who escapes temptation in order to live a life of devoted devotion to God.

Gregory tells the story of a vision Benedict had at the end of his life, which was as follows: In the middle of the night, he was startled by a flood of light beaming down from above that was more dazzling than the sun, and it washed away all trace of darkness.

34). St. Benedict, the preeminent monk, lived a monastic life that culminated in the attainment of God’s vision. It is taken from The Modern Catholic Encyclopedia(A Michael Glazier Book), published by Liturgical Press in 1995, pages 78-79.

Web Resources

Introductions C. Cyprian Alston’s entry on ” The Rule of Saint Benedict ” in the venerable Catholic Encyclopedia is out of date, yet it is comprehensive (NY, 1913; New Advent online collaborative version). It is possible to read more about Saint Benedict by visiting the wonderful website of Christ in the Desert Abbey in Abiqu, New Mexico. The biography of St. Benedict is combined with spiritual instruction in Terry Matz’s piece about him. Search Google, Bing, and other search engines frequently index the contents of the OSB.

Texts and Resources

Books of Benedictine Interest (Liturgical Press, Saint John’s Abbey, Collegeville, Minn.) (Liturgical Press, Saint John’s Abbey, Collegeville, Minn.) The Second Book of his Dialogs contains the first known biography of Saint Benedict, written by Pope St. Gregory the Great. The first draft of an HTML version of the Dialogs, written in English, was published on the OSB website in July 2001. Jeanne Kerremans’ illustrations from 1948 were added to the collection in September 2005. St. Gregory the Great, St.

  • (ca.
  • The Life of Our Most Holy Father Saint Benedict is a fascinating read (CCEL; London: Thomas Baker, 1898).
  • “Saint Benedict,” in Encyclopaedia Britannica, 9th ed.
  • III, entry for “Saint Benedict.” Francis Clark is a writer who lives in the United Kingdom.
  • Studies in the History of Christian Thought, vol.
  • Brill Publishing Company, Boston, 2003.
  • (2005).

An Interpretation of Gregory the Great’s Second Dialogue: hagiography and the Rule of St.

E.

This website has the German version of Gregory the Great’s VitaBenedicti, which is supplemented by a vast bibliography, as well as other resources.

Benedict.

Linda M.

At the end of each chapter, the author offers a brief meditation on the status of current society and how the component of the Rule of Benedict discussed in that chapter corresponds to the concerns of today.

Mark Brown, OblSB, has illustrated this piece.

Also available in Italian under the title ‘The Life of San Benedetto’ (Città Ideale, 2014) is a novel on the life of San Benedetto.

Benedict and Scholastica, The Holy Twins: Benedict and Scholastica(Putnam’s, 2001) on St.

It is a treat for adults to read a book that was written and illustrated just for youngsters.

Markus’s book, Gregory the Great and His World, is available online.

This is an important and very readable resource.

Benedict.

Hilary Costello and Eoin de Bhaldraithe collaborated on the translation.

Bede’s Publications, Petersham, Massachusetts, c1993.

Dom Jean Mabillon, OSB, of the Order of Saint Benedict, retained an ancient narrative regarding the “finding of Saint Benedict’s relics.” It was composed in 1947 by Pope Pius XII to commemorate the 1400th anniversary of the death of Saint Benedict.

A request for the repair of Monte Cassino, which had been decimated by Allied bombing during the Italian Campaign three years earlier, is made by the Holy Father at the conclusion of his address.

St.

Individual monasteries may choose to design their webpages with imagery from their local area, stained glass, or sculptures of the saint.

Benedict|Saint John’s Abbey|OSBSaints Regula Benedicti|Scholastica, his twin Dominican Medal|Prayers for Benedictine Order The Benedictines|The Benedictine Order|General MN 56321-2015 / www.osb.org/gen/benedict.html OSB Information/ Copyright 1995-2017 by OSB, MN 56321-2015 /

Who is St. Benedict? — St. Benedict’s Abbey

Today is the feast of Saint Benedict, the Holy Father of the Church! In honor of his life and ministry, we’d like to share with you a brief summary of his life and accomplishments. We hope you find it useful. Happy Feast Day, everyone! Benedictine monks have built their entire lives and selves on a small set of principles known as the Rule of St. Benedict, which has been in existence for more than one thousand five hundred years already. But where did the Rule originate from in the first place?

  • Benedict?
  • After becoming disillusioned with his studies, he set away from Rome in search of solitude in the wilds of Italy.
  • a modest plate repair foreshadowed the arrival of larger things to come.
  • The monk, Saint Romanus, who lived on the cliffside above Benedict’s cliffside dwelling, provided him with the only means of subsistence: the covert compassion of the monk, Benedict.
  • Over time, the monks got increasingly resentful of his unorthodox way of life, and they attempted to get rid of him by poisoning his wine supply.
  • St.
  • As time went on, he attempted to spread his devotion to Christ to others, creating twelve monasteries until settling in Monte Cassino, where he is buried today.

As a result, The Rule came into being.

Scholastica, St.

St.

In anticipation of his death, he invited monks to pray by his side, and on March 21, 547, St.

Benedictine monasticism sprang out of this germ and flourished throughout Europe.

They held fast to the Christian summons even as civilization crumbled around them, and they preserved a culture that would be replanted once the turbulence of society subsided.

Benedict is regarded as the founding father of western monasticism.

What would the state of western culture be like if St.

Benedict had not existed? It is hard to say – but for more than one thousand five hundred years, monks all around the globe have continued on his magnificent task, always keeping in mind his mandate, that God be exalted in all things, in whatever they do.

Life of Saint Benedict

In the 5th century AD, St. Benedict and his twin sister St. Scholastica were born in Nursia (modern-day Norcia), Italy, to St. Benedict and St. Scholastica. Although the exact year of their birth is unknown, the year 480 AD is generally accepted as the year of their birth. Mother Claudia Abundantia and father Euprobo Abundantia were the parents of St. Benedict and his sister, who were both born into a Christian aristocratic household. According to his father’s desires, and as was typical at the period for children from aristocratic or rich households, St.

  1. Once he had completed his higher studies, St.
  2. When he arrived, he discovered his buddies’ lifestyles to be dissolute and immoral, and he himself had fallen in love with a lady.
  3. All of these factors prompted St.
  4. He left Rome, most likely between 500 and 510 AD, and traveled as far as Enfide with his devoted family nurse Cirilla, who accompanied him the entire way.
  5. Benedict spent time as a hermit, in spiritual seclusion, and in a cave for a period of time.
  6. Benedict, who was by this time well-known for his piety, was invited to take over as the new abbot of the monastery.
  7. Benedict miraculously escaped and returned to his cave in the midst of the chaos.
  8. St.
  9. However, St.
  10. It was on this historic hill, among the remnants of an ancient pagan acropolis, that St.
  11. Here, he penned the immensely influential and significant Rule of St.

Saint Benedict

The Life of Saint Benedict It is a shame that no current biography has been published about a guy who has had the biggest impact on monasticism in the Western world. Saint Gregory’s Dialogues contain many references to Benedict, although these are only drawings to show miraculous features of his life and work. In central Italy, Benedict was born into a prestigious family and educated at the University of Rome. He was drawn to monasticism at a young age. In the beginning, he became a recluse, fleeing a dreary world that included pagan armies on the march, the Church ripped apart by division, people suffering as a result of the conflict, and morals at its lowest point.

Some monks picked Benedict as their leader for a short period of time, but they soon discovered that his strictness was not to their liking.

He conceived the notion of bringing together several monastic families into a single “Grand Monastery” in order to provide them with the benefits of unity, fraternity, and perpetual worship in a single location.

The Rule that eventually emerged specified a life of liturgical prayer, study, physical labor, and living together in community under the supervision of a common abbot (or abbots).

Throughout the Middle Ages, all monasticism in the Western world was eventually subordinated to the Rule of St.

Benedictine families are represented now by two branches: the Benedictine Federation, which includes men and women from the Order of St.

Reflection It is through Benedictine dedication to the liturgy that the Church has been blessed, not only in its physical celebration with rich and correct ceremonial in the great abbeys, but also through the intellectual studies of many of its members that the Church has been blessed.

People who both retain and adapt the authentic heritage of worship in the Church are to be admired and thanked. Saint Benedict is the patron saint of the following countries: Europe Illness of the Kidneys Monastics PoisoningSchoolchildren

Click here for a downloadable quote from Saint Benedict!

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