What Is The Saint For Animals

More saints than Francis of Assisi loved their pets

In October, many churches — not just Catholic parishes — offer pet and animal blessings. These celebrations are held in honor of St. Francis of Assisi, the 13th-century founder of the Franciscan order who is also the patron saint of animals and the environment, among other things. ) In 1979, Pope John Paul II designated Francis as the patron saint of individuals who fight to protect the environment from pollution. About a year before his death in 1226, Francis, who was credited with taming the notorious man-eating wolf of Gubio and was even reported to preach to birds, also authored the “Canticle of the Sun.” The canticle is also known as Laudes Creaturarum in Latin, which means “Light of Creation” (Praise of the Creatures).

Around 1910, an English priest named William Draper translated Francis’ canticle into English and set it to music from a 17th-century German hymn for a children’s festival in his home country of England.

He protects them from harm by his providential care.

Thus people owe them kindness.

  • Francis of Assisi and St.
  • 2416).
  • St.
  • Philip was a saint who lived in the sixteenth century and is associated with cats since it is reported that he toured the streets of Rome with his favorite cat in a basket.
  • Gertrude of Nievelles, who lived in what is now Belgium, is another saint who is renowned as the patron saint of cats.
  • (Keep in mind that rats brought fleas, which spread the plague.) This alone would lead one to believe that Gertrude is a cat enthusiast.
  • Jerome is sometimes pictured with a particularly huge cat: a lion.

The saint then spent the remainder of his life with the thankful creature.

Anthony the Great, which falls on a Sunday (also known as Anthony of Egypt and Anthony, Abbot).

Anthony was one of the desert fathers, and he is known as the “Father of Monks” because of his work with monks.

Mostly, he is credited for being nice to animals, maybe even blessing them, as well as with abstaining from eating meat.

Anthony’s blessing has been carried forth.

The practice there dates back at least to 1930, and it was originally observed on January 17, but it was shifted later in the year due of the warmer weather.

Martin of Tours who is associated with horses, andSt.

Lazarus (the beggar in Jesus’ parable of the rich man and the beggar) who is associated with dog breeds.

Brigid of Ireland is known as the patron saint of pigs.

Francis, on the other hand, resurrected both creatures from the grave, which is only one of the numerous resurrection stories linked with the saint.

When heretics refused to stop and listen to his words, it is believed that St.

An other version of the story claims that Antony bet with a merchant in the Italian town of Ramini on the reality of Christ’s presence in the Eucharist.

Of course, the saint triumphed, and the merchant was persuaded to change his ways by the faith of his donkey.

Francis of Assisi.

Felix of Nola was a confessor of the religion in the third century (which implies he was not killed, but rather suffered for the faith) who lived during the Middle Ages.

The troops did not investigate the building because spiders had built webs around the entrance as soon as Felix entered, giving the impression that it was unoccupied, preventing the soldiers from inspecting it.

Blase is the name to look up to.

“The Catholic Encyclopedia,” “The Catechism of the Catholic Church,” Saints.SQPN.com, and fisheaters.com are some of the sources.

Patron Saint of Pets & Animals – Funeral Help Center

Pet and animal blessings are held in numerous churches during the month of October, not only Catholic parishes. Several activities will be held in honor of St. Francis of Assisi, the 13th-century founder of the Franciscan order who is also the patron saint of animals and nature conservationists. Since 1979, Pope Francis has served as the patron saint of environmentalists, as designated by the Blessed John Paul II. This poem, written around a year before his death in 1226 by Francis, was inspired by his experiences with the notorious man-eating wolf of Gubio, and he was even supposed to preach to birds.

Pope Francis penned a letter to God, wishing that “you be honored Lord in all your creations.” Around 1910, an English priest named William Draper translated Francis’ canticle into English and set it to music from a 17th-century German hymn for a children’s festival in his hometown of Cambridge.

  • It is a reminder from the “Catechism of the Catholic Church” that “animals are God’s creations.” In his providential care, he shields them from danger.
  • As a result, they owe compassion to others.
  • Francis of Assisi and St.
  • 2416).
  • One of these individuals is St.
  • Philippe was a saint who lived in the 16th century and is associated with cats since it is reported that he wandered the streets of Rome carrying his favorite cat in a basket.
  • Gertrude of Nievelles, who lived in what is now Belgium, is another saint who is revered as a cat patron.

The fact that Gertrude is fond of cats alone would lead one to believe that she is a fan of rats (remember that rodents carried fleas that transmitted the plague) However, even though St.

A thorn from the paw of a lion, according to “The Golden Legend,” a classic 13th century book about the lives of saints, was taken from Jerome’s hand.

This narrative reminds me of the tale of the slave Androcles, which may be found in copies of Aesop’s fables.) On January 17, the feast of St.

Pet and animal blessings are widespread on this day in nations with a Spanish background, such as Mexico, where they are practiced.

In the third and fourth centuries, he existed, although his relationship with animals is a bit hazy.

Olvera Street in Los Angeles is one location that has preserved the custom of St.

On the Saturday before Easter, this location hosts an annual pet blessing, which includes a procession.

Certain saints are associated with certain animals: for horses, there is St.

RochandSt.

Because she is claimed to have tamed a wild boar, St.

Saint Francis of Paola is reported to have had a pet lamb and a pet fish (called Martinello and Antonello) who were mistakenly murdered for food when he was out walking.

He is also believed to have refrained eating all meat, fish, and animal products, such as eggs and milk, during his time on our planet.

Anthony of Padua preached to the fish.

Despite being famished for three days, Anthony bet that the man’s donkey would still prefer the Eucharist than a bucket of food if given the option.

Yes, there is a patron saint of spiders, which is appropriate for individuals who may not be as fond of all God’s creatures as Francis was.

Felix of Nola was a saint.

The troops chose not to examine the building because spiders had built webs around the entrance as soon as Felix entered, giving the impression that it was abandoned, preventing the soldiers from examining the structure.

Blase is the name of the saint in question.

“The Catholic Encyclopedia,” “The Catechism of the Catholic Church,” Saints.SQPN.com, and fisheaters.com are some of the resources used in this article.

The Life of St. Francis of Assisi

Pet and animal blessings are held in many churches throughout October, not just Catholic parishes. These celebrations are held in honor of St. Francis of Assisi, the 13th-century founder of the Franciscan order who is also the patron saint of animals and the environment. (Blessed John Paul II designated Francis as the patron saint of people who fight to protect the environment in 1979.) About a year before his death in 1226, Francis, who was credited with taming the terrible man-eating wolf of Gubio and was even supposed to preach to birds, also authored the “Canticle of the Sun.” The canticle is also known as Laudes Creaturarum in Latin (Praise of the Creatures).

  • “May you be glorified, Lord, in all of your creations,” Francis said in his letter to God.
  • In modern times, Draper’s rendition is referred to as “All Creatures of Our God and King.” “Animals are God’s creations,” as the “Catechism of the Catholic Church” tells us.
  • They bless him and exalt him just by virtue of their being.
  • The tenderness with which saints such as St.
  • Philip Neri handled animals can serve as a model for us today” (n.
  • As the catechism mentions, there are more saints who are associated with pets and with animals in general.
  • Philip Neri, often known as the Apostle of Rome.

St.

This Benedictine abbess from the seventh century is sometimes represented with mice and/or cats since she is a patron saint against rat and mice infestations.

Despite the fact that he was not a direct patron of animals, St.

A thorn from the paw of a lion, according to “The Golden Legend,” a renowned 13th-century book about the lives of saints, was removed from Jerome’s grasp by the apostle.

(The narrative is similar to the tale of the slave Androcles, which may be found in copies of Aesop’s fables.) Another popular day for pet blessings is January 17, which is the feast of St.

Pet and animal blessings are frequent on this day in nations with a Spanish background, which includes Mexico.

He lived in the third and fourth centuries, but the nature of his relationship with animals is unclear.

Olvera Street in Los Angeles is one location where the custom of St.

On the Saturday before Easter, this location hosts an annual pet blessing complete with a procession.

St.

RochandSt.

St.

As a child, Francis of Paola was reported to have had two pet lambs, Martinello and Antonello, who were unintentionally slaughtered for food.

He is also believed to have refrained from all meat, fish, and animal products, such as eggs and milk.

Anthony of Padua preached to fish.

If the man’s donkey were famished for three days, Anthony bet that the donkey would still choose the Eucharist than a bucket of food.

Yes, there is a patron saint of spiders, for individuals who may not be as loving of all God’s creatures as Francis was.

Felix of Nola was a confessor of the religion in the third century (which implies he was not martyred, but rather suffered for the faith).

The soldiers chose not to check the structure because spiders had built webs across the entrance as soon as Felix entered, giving the impression that it was deserted.

Blase is the name of the saint.

“The Catholic Encyclopedia,” “Catechism of the Catholic Church,” Saints.SQPN.com, and fisheaters.com are some of the sources.

St. Francis’ Connection to Pets and Animals

Pet and animal blessings are held at many churches during the month of October, not only Catholic parishes. These celebrations are held in honor of St. Francis of Assisi, the 13th-century founder of the Franciscan order and patron saint of animals and the environment. (Blessed John Paul II designated Francis as the patron saint of individuals who advocate for environmental causes in 1979.) Francis, who was credited with taming the fearsome man-eating wolf of Gubio and was even reported to have preached to birds, also authored the “Canticle of the Sun” approximately a year before his death in 1226.

  • “May you be praised, Lord, in all your creations,” Francis said in his letter.
  • Draper’s rendition is known today as “All Creatures of Our God and King.” “Animals are God’s creations,” the “Catechism of the Catholic Church” tells us.
  • They bless him and give him praise just by virtue of their being.
  • “We should remember the tenderness with which saints such as St.
  • Philip Neri handled animals” (n.
  • As the catechism indicates, there are numerous saints who are associated with pets and other types of animals.
  • Philip Neri, also known as the Apostle of Rome.

Cats are also patronized by Saint Gertrude of Nievelles, who lived in what is now Belgium and is considered to be a patron saint of cats.

(Keep in mind that rats brought fleas, which spread the plague.) This alone would lead one to believe that Gertrude is a cat lover.

Jerome is sometimes pictured with a particularly huge cat: a lion.

The thankful creature then stayed with the saint for the remainder of his life.

Anthony the Great (also known as Anthony of Egypt and Anthony, Abbot).

Anthony was one of the desert fathers and is known as the “Father of Monks.” He lived in the third and fourth century, although the details of his relationship with animals are hazy.

Olvera Street in Los Angeles is one location that has maintained the custom of St.

On the Saturday before Easter, this location hosts an annual pet blessing, replete with a procession.

Certain saints are associated with certain animals, such as St.

RochandSt.

St.

St.

Francis, on the other hand, revived both pets from the dead, which is one of several resurrection traditions linked with him.

St.

Another tradition claims that Anthony made a bet with a merchant in Ramini, Italy, over the reality of Christ’s presence in the Eucharist.

Of course, the saint triumphed, and the merchant was persuaded to repent by the faith of his donkey.

St.

According to tradition, Felix was forced to seek refuge in a deserted building from Roman troops who were persecuting Christians.

And, if you’re wondering if there is a patron saint for persons who care for animals, there is: St.

This fourth-century martyr, well renowned for his blessings of the throats, is also the patron saint of veterinarians, as he is supposed to have treated sick animals and prayed while in the midst of a herd of wild animals.

“The Catholic Encyclopedia,” “The Catechism of the Catholic Church,” Saints.SQPN.com, and fisheaters.com are some of the resources.

Prayers of St. Francis of Assisi for Sick Pets and other Catholic Prayers at Heavenly Divine Custom Rosaries

Pet and animal blessings are held in numerous churches during the month of October, and not only Catholic parishes. These celebrations are held in honor of St. Francis of Assisi, the 13th-century founder of the Franciscan order who is also the patron saint of animals and the environment, among other things. ) In 1979, Pope John Paul II designated Francis as the patron saint of individuals who fight to protect the environment from pollution. About a year before his death in 1226, Francis, who was credited with taming the notorious man-eating wolf of Gubio and was even reported to preach to birds, also authored the “Canticle of the Sun.” The canticle is also known as Laudes Creaturarum in Latin, which means “Light of Creation” (Praise of the Creatures).

  • Around 1910, an English priest named William Draper translated Francis’ canticle into English and set it to music from a 17th-century German hymn for a children’s festival in his home country of England.
  • They bless and exalt him just by virtue of their presence on the planet.
  • The tenderness with which saints such as St.
  • Philip Neri handled animals should serve as a model for us” (n.
  • As the catechism mentions, there are more saints who are associated with pets and other types of animals than these.
  • Philip Neri, also known as the Apostle of Rome, who is considered to be a saint.
  • St.
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This Benedictine abbess from the seventh century is frequently represented with mice and/or cats since she is a patron saint of those who suffer from rat and mice infestations.

Despite the fact that he was not a direct patron of animals, St.

A thorn from the paw of a lion, according to “The Golden Legend,” a classic 13th-century book about the lives of saints, was removed from Jerome’s grasp by the saint.

This narrative reminds me of the story of the slave Androcles, which may be found in copies of Aesop’s fables.) Another popular occasion for pet blessings is on January 17, which is the feast of St.

Pet and animal blessings are frequent on this day in nations with a Spanish background, such as Mexico, where it is customary.

He lived in the third and fourth century, but the details of his relationship with animals are hazy at best.

Olvera Street in Los Angeles is one location where the custom of St.

This is the location of an annual pet blessing, which includes a parade, which takes place the Saturday before Easter.

For example, there is St.

RochandSt.

Because she is claimed to have tamed a wild boar, St.

Saint Francis of Paola is reported to have had a pet lamb and a pet fish (called Martinello and Antonello) who were unintentionally murdered for food when they were accidentally slain for food.

Furthermore, he is believed to have abstained from eating any animal products, including but not limited to meat, fish, and dairy items.

Anthony of Padua preached to the fishes in the sea.

Despite being famished for three days, Anthony bet that the man’s donkey would still prefer the Eucharist than a bucket of food if given the choice.

For others who may not be as fond of all God’s creatures as Francis was, there is even a patron saint of spiders, who is named after St.

St.

According to tradition, Felix was forced to take refuge in a deserted building in order to avoid being discovered by Roman troops who were persecuting Christians.

Lastly, if you’re wondering if there is a patron saint for persons who care for animals, St.

Since he is claimed to have treated sick animals and prayed while surrounded by wild animals, this fourth-century martyr, who is most known for his throat blessings, is also renowned as the patron saint of veterinarians.

“The Catholic Encyclopedia,” “The Catechism of the Catholic Church,” Saints.SQPN.com, and fisheaters.com are some of the sources.

Biography of St. Francis of Assisi, the Patron Saint of Animals

St. Francis of Assisi (c. 1181–Oct. 3, 1226) is the patron saint of animals, commerce, and the environment, according to the Roman Catholic Church. He apparently left a life of luxury after hearing the voice of God, who instructed him to rebuild the Christian church and live in poverty, according to reports. St. Francis is known for the miracles that many claim God accomplished through him, as well as for his concern for the defenseless, particularly the poor, the ill, and the animals, among other things.

Fast Facts: St. Francis of Assisi

  • Popular for: Being the patron saint of animals
  • Also known as: Francesco (or Giovanni) di Pietro di Bernardone
  • Born in Assisi, Italy, about 1181
  • Died in Assisi, Italy, around 1190
  • Pietro di Bernardone and Pica de Bourlemont were his parents
  • He died on October 3, 1226, at Assisi, Italy. Quote to Remember: “Begin by doing what is required
  • Then do what is doable
  • And suddenly you are doing the unthinkable.”

Early Life

Francis was born about 1181 in Assisi, Umbria, a region in central Italy, to Giovanni di Pietro di Bernardone and Francesca de’ Medici. It is said that his father, Pietro di Bernardone, was a wealthy textile trader who married a French noblewoman who raised him. His father was away on business at the time of his birth, and his mother named him Giovanni, which is the Italian word for John the Baptist, to honor him. His father desired a businessman rather than a man of God, and he christened his son Francesco, or Francis, in honor of his affection for France.

When asked about his time there, Francis allegedly said, “I lived in sin.”

Life-Changing Experience

He was supposed to follow in his father’s footsteps into the textile industry, but the prospect of such life made him nauseous. He fantasized about a future as a knight, or, in other words, as a medieval action hero. As a result, by 1202, he had joined a militia to fight for Assisi in the city’s conflict with the Italian province of Perugia, which had begun in 1201. Francis was seized when the Assisi army were defeated. Francis’ kidnappers realized he came from an affluent family and was worth a ransom because of his clothing and equipment, so they decided to let him live.

After coming home, he stumbled upon a leper while walking through the woods.

Life of Service

While it was anticipated that he would follow in his father’s footsteps into the textile industry, the prospect of such life bore him. A knight’s life, in other words, a life as a medieval action hero, was something he fantasized about. Consequently, by 1202, he had joined a militia to fight for Assisi in the city’s conflict with the Italian province of Perugia, which had begun in 1201. Francis was captured when his soldiers were defeated by the Assisi army. Francis’ kidnappers realized he came from an affluent family and was worth a ransom because of his clothing and equipment, so they decided to release him.

A leper he met upon in the countryside after coming home. As a result of his captivity, Francis has been transformed, and he embraces the guy and kisses him, eliciting intense feelings of pure contentment and delight in the process.

Miracles for People

Francis hoped that God would work miracles through him and his followers. A tormentingdemonto left his spirit when he washed aleperand begged for it to leave him. As the guy recovered from his injuries, he expressed guilt and sought forgiveness from God. Another day, three bandits broke into Francis’ community and took food and water from him. He prayed for them and dispatched a friar to deliver bread and drink to them. The thieves were moved by Francis’ deeds, and they joined his order, dedicating their lives to giving rather than stealing from others.

Miracles for Animals

During his benediction, Francis requested that God work miracles through him. A tormentingdemonto left his spirit when he rinsed the aleperand begged for it to leave him. He felt regret and was able to reconcile with God as a result of the healing. An another incident occurred when three burglars entered Francis’ community and stole food and water. A friar was dispatched to bring them bread and drink, which he prayed for as well. Francis’ acts inspired the thieves, who joined his order and dedicated their lives to giving rather than taking from others.

Death

Francis hoped that God would use him to do miracles. A tormentingdemonto left his spirit when he washed aleperand begged for it to leave his soul. As the guy recovered, he expressed guilt and sought forgiveness from God. Another day, three bandits broke into Francis’ community and stole food and water. He prayed for them and dispatched a friar to distribute bread and wine to them. Because of Francis’ acts, the thieves decided to join his order and devote their lives to giving rather than taking from others.

Legacy

Those who disagreed with Francis said he was a fool or deluded, while those who agreed believed he was one of the best examples of fulfilling the Christian ideal since Jesus Christ. Francis of Assisi was well-known across the Christian world, regardless of whether he had been touched by God or had gone insane. Francis has been designated as the patron saint of animals by the Catholic Church as a result of his concern for animals. Because of the rough garments that Francis and his followers wear, they are distinct from other priests of the Catholic Church.

The order continues to provide assistance to the disadvantaged around the world.

Sources

  • Those who disagreed with Francis said he was a fool or deluded, while those who agreed believed he was one of the greatest living representations of the Christian ideal since Jesus Christ. He was well-known throughout the Christian community, whether he had been touched by God or had fallen into craziness. Francis has been designated by the Catholic Church as the patron saint of animals because of his concern for animals. Because of the rough clothes that Francis and his followers wear, they are distinct from other priests in the Catholic Church. The Franciscan Order of the Catholic Church was founded by Francis and his followers. The order continues to provide assistance to the disadvantaged throughout the entire world. Following Francis’ death in 1227 and the proof of miracles that occurred during his service, Pope Gregory IX canonized him as a saint barely two years later, in 1228.

Saint Roch: The Patron Saint of Dogs

The 16th of August, 2020 The annual feast day of St. Roch, the patron saint of dogs, is celebrated on August 16. As a French nobleman born in 1295, Saint Roch (pronounced “rock”) may appear to be an odd choice as the patron saint of dogs. After all, he was born into a noble family. However, there is a great deal more to the narrative.

Patron Saint of Dogs

on the 16th of August, 2021.

St. Roch, the patron saint of dogs, celebrates his yearly feast day on August 16. As a French nobleman born in 1295, Saint Roch (pronounced “rock”) may appear to be an odd choice as the patron saint of dogs. However, this is not the case. A great deal more, though, is at play here.

The Plague Strikes.

After years of assisting others and devoting virtually all of his wealth to those in need, Saint Roch was ultimately struck down by the plague himself. He chose to die in the wilderness rather than burden others with his care because he did not want to bother others with his care. A stray dog came upon him when he was suffering, starving, and alone in the woods. Roch had fully anticipated the beast attacking him and putting an end to his pain. As a substitute, the animal gave him bread to consume.

It is stated that this hunting dog saved Roch’s life by licking the wounds left by the disease and by bringing him food to keep him alive throughout the pandemic.

Cared for by a Hunting Dog

Roch was able to recover in the end. He and his freshly acquired dog headed into town, where they found that the dog belonged to a local Count who had been a long-time friend of theirs. The dog was handed to Roch by the owner, who was taken aback and amazed by it. Together, Roch and his newfound four-legged companion set off on a new journey, finally returning to their home in Montpelier, France. However, Roch’s life was not yet done, and they were in for much more adventures.

Arrest and Imprisonment

Roch was able to regain his strength. He and his freshly acquired dog headed into town, where they learned that the dog belonged to a local Count who had been a long-time friend of his. The dog was introduced to Roch by his owner, who was taken aback and amazed. As a pair, Roch and his newfound four-legged companion set off on a journey that ultimately brought them back to Montpelier, France. They were about to go on yet another journey, but Roch’s life was far from ended just yet!

St. Francis: Patron saint of animals – and activism?

Roch was eventually able to recover. The two of them proceeded into town and learned that the dog belonged to a local Count who had been an old acquaintance over the years. The puppy was introduced to Roch by the owner, who was taken aback and amazed. Together, Roch and his newfound four-legged companion set off on a journey that finally brought them back to Montpelier, France. However, Roch’s life was far from done, and they were in for much more adventures.

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Roch was able to regain his strength in the end. He and his newly acquired dog traveled into town and learned that the dog belonged to a local Count who had been a friend over the years. Roch was surprised and impressed when the puppy was introduced to him by the owner. Roch and his newfound four-legged companion set out on a new journey, finally returning to their home in Montpelier, France. However, Roch’s life was far from done, and they were in for far more adventures ahead.

“All ye birds of the air, bless the Lord”

Saint Francis and his companions were on a journey through the Poleto Valley, near the village of Bevagna, when they came upon this sign. Saint Francis was startled when he noticed a large number of birds of various kinds, including doves, crows, and others. Saint Francis, swept up in the moment, abandoned his companions on the path and raced after the birds, who eagerly awaited his arrival in the woods. He greeted them in his customary manner, anticipating that they would flee into the air as he talked to them.

  1. He asked them if they would like to remain for a bit and listen to the Word of God, and they agreed.
  2. It was God who elevated you above all other animals by creating a dwelling for you in the sky.
  3. Afterwards, Saint Francis went directly into the midst of them before turning around and returning to them, stroking their heads and bodies with his tunic.
  4. They took off in a jubilant manner, and Saint Francis continued on his journey, thanking God for everything.
  5. Afterward, he made it his habit to solicitously invite all birds, animals, and reptiles to sing praises to and respect their Creator from that point forth.
  6. A swarm of loud birds that were interfering with a religious occasion was once brought under control by him!
  7. Francis was canonized in 1228 by Pope Gregory IX, who also placed the foundation stone for the Basilica of Saint Francis in Assisi at the time of the declaration.

Doves have nested at the Basilica since it was built, according to mythology, and have done so ever since the foundation stone was put in the basilica.

The Rabbit

During their journey through the Poleto Valley, near Bevagna, Saint Francis and his companions encountered a wolf. A large number of birds of various kinds were suddenly sighted by St. Francis, including doves, crows, and other creatures. Saint Francis, swept up in the moment, abandoned his companions on the walk and hurried after the birds, who awaited him patiently. In his typical manner, he greeted them, fully expecting them to take off into the air as he talked. The group, however, remained stationary.

  1. To them, he said: “Please remember to give thanks to your Creator and always adore him for providing you with feathers for clothing, wings to fly, and everything else that you require.
  2. You receive God’s guidance and protection even if you do not sow or reap.” Following this, birds began to expand their wings, lengthen their necks, and stare at the saint, rejoicing and praising God in a marvelous fashion that was appropriate for their species.
  3. When he was finished, he blessed them by creating a cross above their heads.
  4. Later, Saint Francis pondered aloud with his friends why he had never preached to birds before to this experience.
  5. Saint Francis communicated with animals on several occasions throughout his life, and some of these encounters were noteworthy.
  6. The birds stayed silent throughout Francis’ sermon, much to the delight of everyone in attendance.
  7. Doves have nested at the Basilica since it was built, according to mythology, and have done so ever since the foundation stone was set.

Tamed by the Spirit of Peace

Whilst visiting in the town of Gubbio, Saint Francis learnt about a wild dog that was not only killing and devouring animals, but even people, who had been attacked by the wolf. The people took up arms and pursued the wolf, but those who came into contact with it died as a result of the wolf’s razor-sharp fangs. Villagers began to be terrified to venture outside the city gates. Saint Francis felt sorry for the people and chose to confront the wolf in the wilderness. Although he was repeatedly warned by the populace, he maintained that God would take care of him.

  • However, the peasants quickly lost spirit and said that they would not go any further.
  • Suddenly, the wolf came out of the trees, his jaws gaping, straight towards the pair.
  • The wolf was forced to slow down and lock its mouth as a result of the might of God.
  • I command you not to cause harm to anybody in the name of Christ.” The wolf dropped its head and sat down at Saint Francis’ feet, as gentle as a lamb, at that very moment.
  • “Brother Wolf,” said Francis, “I wish to establish peace between youand the people of Gubbio.
  • All of one’s previous transgressions are to be forgiven.” A movement of the wolf’s body and a nod of its head demonstrated its agreement.
  • As Saint Francis extended his hand to accept the promise, the wolf reached out with its front paw and put it in the saint’s palm.
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SaintFrancis was accompanied by a submissive wolf.

Saint Francis delivered a lecture to the town, accompanied by the wolf, on the beautiful and terrifying love of God, and he called on the people to repent of their sins.

The residents of the town made a rousing commitment to feed the wolf.

He lowered his head and contorted his body in such a way that everyone was persuaded he had accepted the contract with no hesitation.

From that day on, the people remained committed to the agreement they had reached.

No one was harmed, and no one was harmed by it.

The residents of Gubbio were heartbroken when the wolf died of old age towards the end of his life.

Because of the wolf’s tranquil demeanor, they were reminded of the miracles of Saint Francis’ patience, virtues, and sanctity, which served as a live reminder to them. It has served as a living emblem of the power and providence of the living God throughout history.

Saint Francis and the Lambs

Because Saint Francis valued the sanctity of all life, he saw all creatures as brothers and sisters in the Lord, a sentiment that is reflected in his writings. He came across a trader who was transporting two little lambs to the market on one occasion. Because of the lambs’ sorrowful bleating, he caressed them and inquired of the farmer, “Why do you afflict my brothers the lambs?” he said. When he discovered, to his horror, that the guy intended to sell them for slaughter, he exclaimed, “That will not happen!” and purchased the animals from the individual.

At another point during his stay in Rome, Saint Francis acquired a lamb for himself, which he then presented to the lady Jacopa upon his departure.

Indeed, in its excitement to get to church it would often wake itsmistress with gentle buttings on the head when she was late it gettingup.

The Donkey Who Wept

The legend has it that, on his deathbed, St. Francis expressed gratitude to his donkey for carrying and aiding him throughout his life, and that his donkey cried in response.

The Congregation of Fish

Whenever a fish was captured and he was present, he would release the fish back into the water, telling it not to be caught again in the same spot. On numerous instances, the fish would congregate alongside the boat for a period of time, listening to Saint Francis speak, until he granted them permission to depart. Then they would jump into the water and swim away. He would find appreciation for the artist, our loving Creator, in every piece of art, as Saint Francis referred to all creation as.

Prayer for the Blessing of Pets (commonly done on Saint Francis’ feast day, October 4th)

God, you are greatly praised as the creator of all living beings. You summoned the fish in the water, the birds in the sky, and the animals on the ground. Saint Francis was moved by your actions and addressed them all as brothers and sisters. I’d want you to bless this pet for me. Allow it to live according to your plan by using the power of your love to make it happen. May we always remember to thank you for all of your beautiful creations. Blessed are you, Lord our God, in all your creatures, in all your creations!

Bless Your Pets on the Feast of St. Francis of Assisi

The Feast of St. Francis of Assisi remembers St. Francis’ life and works of charity.

Who is St. Francis of Assisi

In the 12th century, St. Francis of Assisi was born in Italy and formed the Order of Friars Minor, the Order of St. Clare, and the Third Order of Saint Francis for men and women who were unable to live the life of traveling preachers. He was canonized in 1431. St. Francis is considered to be one of the most renowned religious saints in the history of mankind.

He is recognized for his generosity to the needy, his readiness to minister to lepers, and his love of animals and nature. He is also noted for his love of animals and environment. He is the patron saint of animals and the environment, according to the Catholic Church.

The Blessing of Animals

Many people bring their pets to the church to be blessed on St. Francis’ feast day because of his compassion for animals as portrayed in his Canticle of Creatures. You may pray for and bless your pets and animals at home too. Whether in your backyard, garden, or somewhere else inside your home, a vocal blessing and a sprinkling of holy water can be presented. It is possible to utilize the following Pet Blessing: God, you are greatly praised as the creator of all living beings. You commanded the appearance of fish in the water, birds in the sky, and creatures on the ground.

Francis was moved by your actions and addressed them all as his brothers and sisters.

Allow it to live according to your plan by using the power of your love to make it happen.

Blessed are you, Lord our God, in all your creatures, in all your creations!

Go Deeper

During this time of year, consider giving pet food, as well as gently used blankets and towels, to your local animal rescue organization. The Feast of St. Francis of Assisi gives an excellent chance to educate youngsters about endangered or abused animals, as well as what we can all do to support them in their quest for survival.

St. Francis vs. St. Anthony: The Animal Blessing Debate

As October 4th—the Feast Day of St. Francis—draws closer, many Catholic and Episcopalian churches in the US organize special Blessings of the Animals, religious services to commemorate both the adored patron saint of animals and highlight the significant relationship humans have with the animal kingdom. As a result, you could believe that Italians are preparing to celebrate their cats, dogs, hamsters, and every other type of household pet conceivable. You’d be mistaken, though. The Feast Day of St.

  1. Catherine of Siena), but Italy holds its Blessings of the Animals on January 17th, the Feast Day of St.
  2. Anthony of Egypt).
  3. Francis was assigned to all animals, St.
  4. As a result, it is understandable that this historically agrarian country would be more drawn to the saint who is more realistic.
  5. Of fact, there are numerous Italian-American foods that are distant relatives to their original forms in the Old Country, such as the “traditional Italian” Feast of the Seven Fishes, which is yet another example.

The good news is that it’s pleasant to join in both celebrations for St. Francis and for St. Anthony the Abbot if you chance to be in Italy in the autumn and winter. Here are some religious (and secular) activities involving both saints.

Feast Day of St. Francis (October 4th)

St. Francis of Assisi is one of the two patron saints of Italy—though he is not the patron saint of his hometown of Assisi, which is commemorated on August 11th in honor of San Rufino, the first bishop of Assisi—and many cities observe the saint’s feast day by closing schools and offices in honor of him. Two days are dedicated to the commemoration of St. Francis at Assisi, with the most notable ceremonies taking place there. High Mass is conducted at the Basilica of Saint Francis on the saint’s actual Feast Day, which is virtually always attended by the Pope and televised live on national television.

The next day, the focus shifts to a more secular celebration as Assisi organizes a bustling outdoor market that takes up much of the historic center.

This is not to suggest that there are no animal blessing rites in Italy on or around the feast day of St.

The saint is honored in churches around the peninsula, and many of these churches provide modest favors to the local cats and dogs.

Feast Day of St. Anthony the Abbot (January 17th)

Photo courtesy of Fabrizio Sciamivia Flickr, used under a Creative Commons BY-SA 2.0 license. The feast day of St. Anthony the Abbot, on the other hand, is marked by special Blessing of the Animals Masses and processions held all across the country, in contrast to the celebrations of St. Francis, which are primarily focused on the town of Assisi. The ceremony performed in the Vatican, on the other hand, is by far the most well-known (which went virtual in 2020 due to Coronavirus restrictions).

  1. The stable is available to the public from early morning until early afternoon, and for many Roman families, visiting the stable is an annual tradition.
  2. Every day at noon, an equestrian procession travels through Rome’s historic center along Via della Conciliazione, from Largo Giovanni XXIII to Piazza Pio XII, with service horses from the Italian police forces in attendance.
  3. Oxen, cows, horses, donkeys, and a variety of courtyard animals, as well as every type of pet you can think, may be found in more rural villages.
  4. After the animals have been returned to their owners, they are left alone for the night.

According to Italian folklore, animals get the power to communicate on the night of St. Anthony the Abbot’s feast, but it is considered bad luck to listen in on what they have to say, thus traditionally farmers and their families avoid the barns and stables on that night!

Related posts:

In Assisi, take a walk along the paths of St. Francis and St. Clare. So, you’d like to meet with the Pope (or just the Vatican). I Santi e I Morti: All Saints’ and All Souls’ Days are celebrated in Italy.

Why is Francis of Assisi the patron saint of ecology?

Welcoming you to Burning Questions, an EarthBeat series that tackles the burning questions that have been brewing in your mind about climate change and religion – from the fundamentals to the more complicated, and all in between. Do you have a burning question of your own to share? Please let us know. For Catholics, the feast of St. Francis of Assisi is celebrated on October 4, which is commonly acknowledged as such. Francis of Assisi is one of the most well-known and adored of the saints, and his name has become linked in religious pop culture with brown habits, birdbaths, and the blessing of animals on the feast of St.

  1. However, Francis is also renowned as the patron saint of the environment, which goes beyond pets.
  2. Who was it that made that decision?
  3. It’s the subject of our most recent Burning Question here at EarthBeat, which you can read about here.
  4. So, who was Francis of Assisi, and what was his story?
  5. Francis was born in the Italian town of Assisi somewhere between 1181 and 1182, according to historians who disagree on the year.
  6. Francis got ill when he was captured during a fight with a nearby town in 1201, and his condition deteriorated rapidly.
  7. Later, as he prepared to embark on a new military mission, he had a dream in which God spoke to him, and he decided to return to Assisi in order to provide care for the sick and the sickly.

Francis initially interpreted this message as a directive to restore the Church of San Damiano, located outside of Assisi, but eventually realized that it was referring to the entire church, and some have even suggested that it was referring to creation itself.

He went on to form the Order of Friars Minor (generally known today as the Franciscans), as well as co-founding the Order of St.

He was well-known for his devotion to all of creation (we’ll get into that more later), but he was also well-known for his dedication to the poor, peace, and interreligious communication, as seen by his meeting with the Sultan of Egypt during the Fifth Crusade.

He was recognized as a saint less than two years after his death.

As it turns out, that wasn’t all that long ago.

29, 1979, Pope John Paul II issued a papal bull in which he named St.

St.

The “Canticle of the Creatures,” Francis’ renowned prayer hymn that is considered to be one of the pillars of Franciscan spirituality, was also referenced by Pope John Paul II.

And it was Pope Francis who was the first to use the saint of Assisi as the inspiration for his papal name.) In the late 1970s, Francis of Assisi was designated as the patron saint of ecology, capping a decade that saw the emergence of a contemporary environmental movement that culminated in the inaugural Earth Day celebration, which took place in the United States.

  • Take a step back for a moment.
  • Traditionally, a patron saint is someone who is considered to have the capacity to intercede with God on behalf of others’ prayers, according to Catholic tradition.
  • From the early days of the Catholic Church, the practice of identifying patron saints may be traced back centuries.
  • Yes, there are saints who serve as patrons for particular churches.
  • A patron saint exists for practically every career and condition, as well as for almost every religious denomination.
  • Isidore is known as the “Farmer’s Patron Saint.” St.
  • St.

St.

Some saints are patron saints of a variety of causes.

So, why was Francis of Assisi designated as the patron saint of the environment?

“Sister Moon and Stars,” “Brother Wind,” and “Sister Water” are some of the many names Francis gives to the many elements of creation in his letter.

All praise is due to you, my Lord, via our Sister, Mother Earth, who supports us and instructs us by bringing out all types of fruits, flowers, and herbs in all shades of color and variety.

“For Francis, everything of creation became a theophany, a demonstration of the kindness of God,” says Franciscan Sr.

“As the Canticle reveals, Francis praises God ‘through’ (per) the elements of creation, because nature is viewed as a sacramental manifestation of God’s abundant love, which is shown in the Canticle.

Theologian Michael Delio believes that Francis’ knowledge of God’s presence “was not an immediate experience,” but rather built over time as he matured in his friendship with Christ and learned to see the Incarnation as sanctifying all of creation.

She goes on to say that for Francis, respect for creation did not stem from a sense of duty, but rather from a sense of love, because he regarded it as “intimately connected” with God.

Indeed, Francis’ life is filled with stories about animals, many of which are told in his books.

He then persuaded the creature to pledge his allegiance to the people of Gubbio, and the story ends there.

Additionally, he instructed his companions not to cut down the tree in its entirety when gathering firewood, and to set aside a portion of the garden for wildflowers to blossom.

Some, however, believe that limiting the saint’s ministry and message to “Francis, friend of the animals” risks diluting his message and ministry.

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Daniel Horan, refers to those instances in which the saint is “reduced to a medieval petting-zoo mascot or states simply that he “loved animals” without regard for the radical truth about God and creation that he intended.

Francis called all creatures — including nonhuman animals that we classify as sentient, but also rocks and trees — his sisters and brothers “because, in a real sense, they are,” he said, adding that the consequences of humanity’s hubris, which places us above creation, are visible in pollution of the environment, extinction of species, and climate change.

  • All of those characteristics can be found in the way humans interact with the environment in which they live.
  • Francis’ teachings on creation?
  • Theologian Delio, in her 2003 book on the issue, A Franciscan View of Creation: Learning to Live in a Sacramental World, asks the following question to help illustrate her point of view on the subject: When it comes to nature, what is our most essential relationship?
  • Delio describes it as a vision in which God’s self-expression in the world is seen as dynamic, and each creature as an aspect of God’s self-expression in the world.

Delio goes on to say that this Franciscan view of creation requires people to recognize their interconnectedness with the natural world, as well as how sinful acts have contributed to current ecological crises and how future actions can either contribute to God’s vision for the world or sabotage it.

In fact, three years after Francis of Assisi was designated as the patron saint of ecology, Franciscans and representatives from Italian environmental organizations convened at the Terra Mater International Seminar to discuss environmental issues.

Where can I find out more information?

At Franciscantradition.org, you may read the writings of Francis and Clare of Assisi, as well as early biographies, and learn more about their lives.

For the 35th anniversary of Francis of Assisi being declared the patron saint of ecology in 1984, the global Franciscan family built a website, Francis35.org, to commemorate the occasion.

There are also a plethora of papers and books published on Francis and Franciscan ecology, which may be found online.

Several of the authors, includingDelio and Horan, are regular contributors to NCR and Global Sisters Report, and they have written for both publications. The following are some recommended readings on Franciscan ecotheology:

  • Welcoming you to Burning Questions, an EarthBeat series that tackles the burning questions that have been brewing in your mind about climate change and religion – from the simplest to the most complicated, and everything in between. Want to ask your own “Burning Question?” Let us know if you have any questions or need assistance. The feast of St. Francis of Assisi is frequently celebrated on October 4 among Catholics. On the feast of St. Francis of Assisi, one of the most well-known and beloved of the saints, Francis of Assisi has come to be associated with a variety of religious symbols, including brown garments, birdbaths, and animal blessings. Francis is also renowned as the patron saint of the environment, which extends beyond pets. I’m not sure what it means, but it sounds promising. Who was responsible for making the decision? What is the reason for this behavior? Our most recent Burning Question here at EarthBeat is centered on this very question. Let’s get this party started. So, who was Francis of Assisi, and what was his significance? With so much to say, we’ll simply hit the high points for you right now. Approximately between 1181 and 1182, Francis was born in the Italian town of Assisi. Born to a wealthy cloth merchant family, he grew up with the ambition of becoming a knight in his early years. Francis suffered from serious illness following his capture during a fight with an adjacent town in 1201, which occurred during the reign of King Henry II. His conversion began at this period. Later, as he prepared to embark on a new military mission, he had a dream in which God spoke to him, and he decided to return to Assisi in order to provide care for the sick. He had another vision a year later, in 1206, in which Jesus instructed him to construct his church. In the beginning, Francis interpreted this message to imply repairing the Church of San Damiano, which was located outside of Assisi, but he subsequently realized that it was about the entire church, as well as creation itself, as some have speculated. From that point on, Francis dedicated his life to the church, renounced his assets and inheritance in exchange for a life of poverty and austerity. The Order of Friars Minor (generally known today as the Franciscans) was founded by him, and he was also a co-founding member of the Order of St. Clare as well as the Third Order Secular and Third Order Regular. We’ll get into that more later, but he was also well-known for his devotion to the poor, peace, and interreligious communication, as seen by his meeting with the sultan of Egypt during the Fifth Crusade, which we’ll get into more detail later. October 1226 marked the anniversary of Francis’s death. He was sanctified as a saint less than two years after that. His designation as the patron saint of environment was given to him at some point in time. As it turns out, it wasn’t all that long ago after all! Saint Francis of Assisi was named the patron saint of ecology and people who support it by Pope John Paul II in a papal bull released on Nov. 29, 1979. “Among the saintly and great persons who have venerated nature as a magnificent gift of God to the human race, St Francis of Assisi merits special recognition,” stated Pope John Paul II in the bull. He went on to praise Francis’ deep awareness of the Creator at work in the world and the presence of the heavenly spirit as a result of that perception. The “Canticle of the Creatures,” Francis’ renowned prayer poem that is considered to be one of the pillars of Franciscan spirituality, was also cited by Pope John Paul II in his homily on the subject. “Praise be to you, my Lord,” or “Laudato Si’, mi signore,” as the canticle’s recurrent refrain is known in Umbrian dialect of early Italian, was the inspiration for Pope Francis’ 2015 encyclical on the environment and human ecology, “Laudato Si’, on Care for Our Common Home.” And it was Pope Francis who was the first to choose St. Francis of Assisi as the saint who would become the patron saint of the Roman Catholic Church. With the late 1970s, Francis of Assisi was designated as the patron saint of ecology, capping a decade that saw the emergence of a contemporary environmental movement that culminated in the inaugural Earth Day celebration, which was hosted in the United States. Earth Day didn’t become a worldwide celebration until 1990, therefore the combination of these two events may have been more of an accident than anything else. Allow me to take a step back. To be a patron saint of anything, what does it entail exactly? Traditionally, a patron saint is someone who is thought to have the capacity to intercede with God on behalf of others’ prayers in accordance with Catholic tradition. Additionally, these are titles that celebrate the life of a saint. Tradition has it that designating patron saints extends back centuries, to the early days of the Catholic religion. Nowadays, it appears as though there are patron saints for every conceivable cause or circumstance. Yes, there are saints who serve as patrons for particular churches. For towns and nations, there are patron saints who are revered (Francis of Assisi and Clare of Assisi, for example, are co-patron saints of Italy). A patron saint exists for practically every career and condition, as well as for almost every religious tradition. Farmers are patronized by St. Isidore, who is known as the Farmer’s Saint. Mary of Hungary is the patron saint of bakers, and she is also known as St. Elizabeth of Hungary. HEADACHES are patronized by St. Teresa of Avila. The patron saint of journalists is St. Francis de Sales. Some saints are patrons of a variety of causes. In addition to Clare of Assisi, Francis’ contemporary and patron saint of eye diseases and beautiful weather, she is also the patron saint of television. How did Francis of Assisi come to be known as the “Patron Saint of the Environment?” Continue with “The Canticle of the Creatures,” which the saint penned at the end of his life and was dedicated to the creatures of the universe. “Sister Moon and Stars,” “Brother Wind,” and “Sister Water” are among of the many names Francis gives to the many elements of creation in his letter. Francis also urges everyone to join him in giving thanks to God for the various elements of creation. All praise is due to you, my Lord, via our Sister, Mother Earth, who supports us and instructs us by bringing out all types of fruits, flowers, and herbs in all shades of color. In addition to serving as a hymn of praise, it also serves as a reflection on how he came face to face with the Almighty in all things. Sr. Ilia Delio states in her book Franciscan Sr. Ilia Delio’s Theology of Creation that “for Francis, everything became a theophany, a revelation of God’s kindness.” “‘Through’ (per) creation, Francis expresses his gratitude to God, as revealed by the Canticle, which reveals Francis’ understanding of nature as a sacramental expression of God’s gracious love. ‘Brother’ and’sister’ are the bonds that tie us together in this family of love.” During his biography of Francis, St. Bonaventure, one of his early disciples and a doctor of the church, wrote of the saint, “He relished in all of the works of the Lord’s hands and, by their wonderful exhibition, he ascended into the life-giving reason and cause.” He went on to say that he savored each and every creature, as if they were rivulets of that fontal Goodness, and that he discerned an almost celestial choir in the chords of power and activity given to them by God, and that he sweetly encouraged them to praise the Lord, just as the prophet David had done. Bonaventure continued: A theologian at Villanova University, Delio says that Francis’ knowledge of God’s presence “was not a sudden experience,” but rather built over time as he deepened his relationship with Christ and learned to see the Incarnation as sanctifying all of creation. The realization that Francis was actually a brother to the entire cosmos took him a lifetime to get to. “Respect for creation” was not a matter of obligation for Francis, but rather a matter of love, according to her. This was because he considered creation as “intimately connected” with God. In Francis’s opinion, “everything spoke to him of God’s limitless love.” Isn’t it true that Francis had a unique bond with animals as well? Indeed, Francis’ life is filled with anecdotes about animals, many of which are true. A wolf that was ravaging the town of Gubbio was tamed by Francis, who used the symbol of the cross as his sole armor. He then persuaded the monster to swear to live in peace with the inhabitants of Gubbio. A third was dedicated to the creation of dove nests for commercial distribution. Additionally, he instructed his colleagues not to take down the tree in its entirety when gathering firewood, and to put aside a piece of the garden for wildflowers to flourish. On Francis of Assisi’s feast day, one of the most common ways for people to connect with him is via the blessing of pets and animals in parish churches. Some, however, believe that limiting the saint’s ministry and message to “Francis, friend of the animals” risks diluting his message and ministry. “The birdbath industrial complex” surrounding Francis, according to Franciscan Fr. Daniel Horan, refers to those instances in which the saint is “reduced to a medieval petting-zoo mascot or simply stated that he “loved animals” without regard for the radical truth about God and creation that he intended. He went on to say that St. Francis called all creatures — including nonhuman animals that we classify as sentient, but also rocks and trees — his sisters and brothers “because, in a real sense, they are,” he said, adding that the consequences of humanity’s hubris, which places us above creation, are visible in pollution of the Earth, extinction of species, and climate change. According to Pope Francis in his encyclical Laudato Si’, the saint’s approach to creation was radical: “The poverty and austerity of Saint Francis were not only a veneer of asceticism, but something far more radical: a refusal to convert reality into an object that can be exploited and controlled.” According to Pope Francis, “He demonstrates how inextricably linked the bonds of care for nature, justice for the poor, dedication to society, and inner tranquility are.” How humans regard the environment in which they live embodies each of these characteristics. The teachings of St. Francis on creation have left a lasting legacy, but what is it now? The fact that Francis of Assisi left the world with a Franciscan perspective on creation cannot be denied. Theologian Delio, in her 2003 book on the subject, A Franciscan View of Creation: Learning to Live in a Sacramental World, asks the following question to help clarify her point of view on creation: When it comes to nature, what is our most fundamental connection? According to a guide to Franciscan perspectives on creation, “we live in solidarity with every component of creation, aware that creation is imperfect and yearns for its completeness in God.” Delio describes it as a worldview in which God’s self-expression in the world is seen as dynamic, and each creature as a part of that expression. “Because everything is formed individually and uniquely via the Word of God, the essential link between the Incarnation and creation leads to the central premise that each and every component of creation has perfect dignity.” Everything in God’s creation, according to the Franciscan faith, is “a free gift from God, given equally to all.” It espouses a reverent attitude toward nature, and it bases its ecological commitment on a reverent attitude toward all that comes from God. Moreover, according to Delio, this Franciscan view of creation requires people to recognize their interconnectedness with the natural world, as well as how sinful acts have contributed to current ecological crises and how future actions can either contribute to God’s vision for the world or sabotage its fulfillment. Franciscan communities have been communicating this message for decades, and it was this message that inspired them to place environmental protection at the heart of their ministries even before Pope Francis issued Laudato Si’. The Terra Mater International Seminar was held three years after Francis of Assisi was designated as the patron saint of ecology, and it was attended by Franciscans and Italian environmental organizations. There, they issued the Gubbio Charter, a declaration that synthesized Franciscan spirituality and modern science in calling on the global community to replace humanity’s exploitation of nature and a planet in peril with “an attitude of sharing, protection, respect, and brotherhood among all creatures,” as described in the Gubbio Charter. As a result, organizations such as the Franciscan Action Networkhave made the protection of the environment, as well as the combating of climate change, the major subject of their public policy advocacy and action. More information is available where can I get it. Francis of Assisi and his teachings on creation and spirituality, as you’ve undoubtedly gathered, are extremely interesting topics to research further. At Franciscantradition.org, you may read the writings of Francis and Clare of Assisi, as well as early biographies, in depth. Franciscans issued a study guide on the care of creation in 2016, following the publication of Laudato Si’, the Pope’s encyclical on creation. For the 35th anniversary of Francis of Assisi being proclaimed the patron saint of ecology in 1984, the global Franciscan family launched a website, Francis35.org, in 2014. Franciscan commitment to working for the integrity of creation is outlined in these materials, which are available in several languages. Also, there are an endless number of essays and books written about Francis and Franciscan environmental ethics. The authors, including Delio and Horan, are frequent contributors to the National Catholic Reporter (NCR) and the Global Sisters Report (GSR). The following are some recommended titles on Franciscan ecotheology:

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