What Is Saint Louis The Patron Saint Of

Saint Louis of France

The Life and Times of Saint Louis of France By taking an oath during his coronation as King of France, Louis IX pledged himself to act in the role as God’s anointed, as a father to his people, and as feudal lord under the King of Peace. Of course, other monarchs have done the same thing in the past. Louis was unique in that he truly understood his kingly responsibilities in the light of his religious beliefs. Following the brutality of the previous two reigns, he restored peace and justice to the country.

His army stormed the Egyptian city of Damietta, but they were encircled and defeated not long after because they were weakened by illness and without help.

He stayed in Syria for a total of four years.

His instructions for royal officials were the first of a succession of reform measures that were passed after his death.

  • Even though Louis was always respectful of the church, he stood up for royal interests in the face of the popes and refused to recognize Innocent IV’s judgment against Emperor Frederick II.
  • He serves as a patron of the Secular Franciscan Order, which he founded.
  • For many years, the country had been at peace.
  • During Advent and Lent, any and all who came forward were given a supper, and Louis personally served them on a number of occasions.
  • In 1270, Louis launched another crusade to North Africa, this time in response to fresh Muslim gains.
  • Louis himself passed away in the city at the age of 56.
  • Reflection Louis was a man of great character and conviction.
  • What was most notable about him was his profound regard for everyone with whom he interacted, particularly the “simple folk of the Lord.” He erected cathedrals, churches, libraries, hospitals, and orphanages in order to provide for his citizens.

He prayed that the King of Kings, to whom he had given his life, his family, and his kingdom, would treat him in the same manner. Saint Louis of France is the patron saint of the following things: Barbers Grooms Order of the Secular Franciscans

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When most people consider St. Louis, they see an ideal town situated in a lovely tetrad of majestic rivers, gifted by God Himself with some of the greatest people, food, and athletic teams in the whole country (no media bias here—this is all true). In addition, I’m from St. Louis). In addition to St. Louis, there was also a man named St. Louis, and since today is his feast day, perhaps we should all spend a few minutes to discover a few fascinating things about him.

  1. For seminarians on “National Kiss and Make Up Day,” he offers comfort and serves as an excellent example.

In the words of a seminarian at Kenrick-Glennon Seminary in St. Louis:

  1. He was the king of France at the time. It was his mother who was known as the “Queen of Catholic Guilt.”

He was born in 1226 and is formally known as St. Louis IX in the long line of French monarchs known as the House of Louis. After he became king at the age of 12, his mother assumed control of the kingdom. But it appears that she was setting the gold standard by which all future Catholic moms would shame their children into holiness by the use of her love language. A few pieces of instruction he received as a child were the following:–The misdeeds of his people were in fact a reflection on him as their monarch.– She would prefer that he perish than that he commit a deadly sin.

  • This would seem like a given for a saint who has been canonized, but consider what he was exposed to as a child.
  • He, on the other hand, was not.
  • In addition to overseeing the affairs of his country, he attended two daily Masses and recited the Divine Office.
  • He enacted legislation that would let serfs to be released from their enslavement.
  • The Pope and Emperor Frederick II, also known as the “Chump City of Emperors,” sought his mediation in disagreements with other European monarchs, notably Pope Innocent IV and the Emperor Frederick II (starting now).
  • It was at Lyons, France (Louis’ home turf), that Pope Innocent held a council and declared Frederick II to be deposed by the people of the Holy See.
  • This was welcome news for St.

I’m aware of the situation.

However, I believe we have lost sight of the true nature of the Crusades.

Louis’ day.

It was the basis upon which you built your relationships with God and with your fellow man, and people were acutely conscious of this.

People also had an obligation to communicate their revelations when they received them from the Holy Spirit.

It wasn’t simply Christians who were affected by this.

Because the unified Christian kings (i.e., Christendom) were offended, they responded by pushing back.

In reality, they determined that they would retake control of the holy towns and reestablish pilgrimage routes. These conquests were referred to the Crusades, and it is through his participation in them that we have learned so much about St. Louis.

  1. He wasn’t terrified of would-be assassins, and he demonstrated this on several occasions

The Crusader St. Louis was captured at one time during his crusading journeys. In Egypt, while St. Louis was being kept captive, an Emir stormed into his tent and demanded that St. Louis knight him or face the prospect of being stabbed. The calm and collected St. Louis advised him that only a disciple of Jesus Christ was qualified to carry out the responsibilities of a Christian knight. Later, his captors gave him the opportunity to be freed in exchange for swearing an oath that indicated blasphemy.

I would want to suggest that because of this deed, he should be made the patron saint of stone cold bruisers all across the world.

While fighting in Tunisia, he had a fever and succumbed to his injuries.

That a side note, imagining political candidates dying in the same manner as he did is a great way to evaluate them.

  1. The Crusader St. Louis was captured at one time during his crusading exploits. In Egypt, while St. Louis was being kept captive, an Emir stormed into his tent and ordered that St. Louis knight him or face death by stabbing. The calm and collected St. Louis advised him that only a disciple of Jesus Christ was qualified to carry out the obligations of a Christian knight. He was later offered release if he would sign an oath that indicated blasphemy against the Islamic faith. Although they pressed their swords against his throat and threatened to murder Christians, Saint Louis remained defiant. My suggestion is that he be made the patron saint of stone cold bruisers all around the world because of his actions in this situation. As soon as he was freed, he embarked on another mission, as if he had absolutely no concern for anything else. Tunisia proved to be the site of his death from a fever after a fight there was won. While kneeling next to his campbed, he was the epitome of a modest and religious king, as Viaticum was to him. For amusement, picture the candidates dying in the same manner that he did, and use that to assess them. If they make you laugh out loud, they may not be the right person for you!

Crusades were a very popular concept for a long time, but they did become a little odd at times. For example, in 1251, hundreds of thousands of poor people known as “pastoraux” (shepherds) embarked on a crusade across France, demanding the liberation of Holy Places and the death of clergy. They were guided by an enigmatic man known only as the Master of Hungary. St. Louis put a stop to all of this insanity. France was also the home of Catharism, which is one of my personal favorite heresy in the history of the Church (also known as Albigensianism, just to confuse us).

They held that the earth was controlled by two diametrically opposed deities.

They also preached that sex was intrinsically bad and that having children was a sin because it trapped a soul in a body, which was both amusing and ridiculous.

Louis resisted them, and they finally learned the hard way that a movement that opposes having children is bound to failure and would eventually collapse.

  1. However, while crusades were a very popular concept, they may become a little bizarre at times. The Crusade of the Pastoraux (Shepherds) in 1251, for example, saw thousands of destitute peasants marching through France demanding the liberation of Holy Places and the murder of clerics. A mysterious man known as the Master of Hungary guided them through the wilderness. Saint Louis put an end to all of this strangeness! One of my personal favorite heresies throughout church history originated in France: catholicism (also known as Albigensianism, just to confuse us). With its own clergy, dioceses, and other institutions, catharism was more of a church than a heresy in the early centuries. In their minds, the universe was dominated by two conflicting deities. In addition, they felt that heretics should either go large or go home, and that the biblical God was the God of evil and the Church was Satan’s invention, since they also believed that heretics should go big or go home. They also preached that sex was intrinsically bad and that having children was a sin since it trapped a soul in a body, which was both ridiculous and amusing at times. When St. Louis battled against them, the city finally learned the hard way that a movement that opposes having children is bound to failure.
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Yes, it is correct. Despite the fact that he had eleven children, he is still the only French monarch to be canonized. He even helped to establish the legal notion of “innocent until proven guilty,” which is a significant achievement. As a native St. Louisan, the most significant thing about him, in my honest view, is the great city that bears his name. St. Louis is the proud owner of the first Cathedral west of the Mississippi, though the diocese erected a new and even more spectacular one in the 1900s.

  • Louis is the proud owner of the first Cathedral west of the Mississippi.
  • Rose Philippine Duchesne among those who arrived.
  • In a nutshell, this city is mostly Catholic.
  • Louis, the city, has presented the globe with the finest entree and dessert known to man, as well as sports teams that have undoubtedly been blessed by the Almighty God.

What a lasting impression. St. Louis de Poissy, king of France, intercede on our behalf! PS: Cheer on the Cardinals!

10 Things To Know About Saint Louis, Himself, On His 800th Birthday

Published at 9:38 p.m. on April 24, 2014. It marks the 800th anniversary of the birth of King Louis IX of France, who is also known as St. Louis, on Friday. You might recognize Louis’ silhouette from the large sculpture on Art Hill in Forest Park, which depicts him as a little boy. You’re familiar with this one: Isn’t this a fantastic image? But we thought we’d share a few more interesting facts about the guy, king, and subsequently saint with you. Louis was born in the year 1214. Was there anything else going on in the globe at the time?

  • 2.
  • It is also worth noting that his younger sister, Isabelle, has been designated as a saint by the Franciscan Order.
  • The fact that a pre-teen was in charge of a country was reason enough for Louis’ mother, Blanche of Castile, to serve as his regent until he attained the age of majority.
  • 4.
  • The magnificent specimen of French gothic architecture was dedicated in 1248 and was constructed to contain King Louis’ collection of relics from the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ.
  • 5.
  • Only seven of them, on the other hand, survived to maturity.

6.

Not at all.

This was despite the fact that King Louis and Margaret were rumored to be in a passionate relationship.

Louis on the Air.) 7.

According to Madden, this was “a significant development.” Trials would no longer be decided by ordeal or fight, but rather by evidence and Roman law, as would be the case today.

In addition, he issued an order prohibiting gambling.

This summer, you may view pieces that were inspired by Louis IX right here in St.

9.

Among them are a facility for the blind and, according to Madden, a facility for ex-prostitutes.

Crusading was the “primary event” of Saint Louis’ life, even if it would ultimately lead to his death on the battlefield.

He made the decision to become a crusader while lying in his bed, following in the footsteps of his father (who, recall, died during a crusade), his grandpa, and his great-grandfather before him.

An expedition to what is now Tunisia would be the final journey for King Louis, and it would take place in 1804. In 1270, he was struck down by illness once more, and he died on August 25, 1270.

St. Louis IX – Saints & Angels

Published at 9:38 p.m. on April 24, 2014 St. Louis’ namesake, King Louis IX of France, was born on this day in 800 AD, according to the Coordinated Daylight Time (CDT). Perhaps you’re familiar with Louis’ silhouette because of the big sculpture on Art Hill in Forest Park that features his likeness. You’re familiar with this: Isn’t it a fantastic image? In the meanwhile, here are a few additional facts about the guy who became king and eventually became a saint: In 1214, King Louis IX was born.

  1. Imperial China was engaged in a major struggle with Genghis Khan, and the Emperor Xuanzong of Jin China was no exception.
  2. Even his younger sister, Isabelle, is revered as a saint by the Franciscan Order, which is a testament to the importance of his family.
  3. At the age of 12, Louis ascended to the throne of France following his father’s death from dysentery while on crusade.
  4. Historically, the bond between Louis and his mother has been noted for its exceptional quality.
  5. The construction of the Sainte-Chapelle in Paris was commissioned by King Louis IX of France.
  6. Here’s a look at the beautiful ceiling from the top: The Sainte-Chapelle in Paris, France, as seen from above, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons/Javi Masa.
  7. He and his wife, Margaret of Provence, had a total of eleven children together.

Of those that survived to adulthood, just seven were males.

Sixth, he and his mother were not on speaking terms.

The mother of Louis, according to Thomas Madden, a professor of medieval history at Saint Louis University, seems to believe that Margaret’s primary role should be childbearing and child raising.

(Check out our section from St.

7.

As part of his Great Edict of 1254, Madden claims that the transfer was necessary.

His support for the arts was outstanding.

This summer, you may view pieces that were inspired by Louis IX right here in Saint Louis.

He is credited with the establishment of various hospitals around France.

Crusading was the “primary event” of Saint Louis’ life, despite the fact that it would ultimately lead to his death.

There, in his bed, he made the decision to follow in the footsteps of his father (who, recall, died during a crusade), his grandpa, and his great-grandfather, and become a crusader in the name of Jesus Christ.

Eventually, King Louis would embark on his final expedition, which would take him to what is now Tunisia. On August 25, 1270, he succumbed to illness for the second time.

Saint of the day: Louis IX of France

Count Saint Louis IX of France was the son of King Louis VIII of France and Blanche of Castile. He was born on April 25, 1215, in the city of Paris. He was elevated to the position of king while he was just 11 years old. Louis was the father of 11 children and lived a life of virtue and prayer that was inspiring to others. “I would sooner see you dead at my feet than guilty of a deadly sin,” Louis’ mother had said many times, and he took those words to heart as he was growing up. As king, he was a passionate supporter of justice, and he went to considerable lengths to ensure that the country’s judicial system functioned effectively.

  1. According to Louis, “The tranquility and benefits of the realm come to us via the destitute,” and he was well-known for his charitable works.
  2. He cleaned their feet and cared for the wounds of lepers, among other things.
  3. In addition to the Sainte Chappelle, which he commissioned as a reliquary for the Crown of Thorns, Louis was also responsible for the building of many other major architectural marvels, like as the Louvre.
  4. The plague claimed the life of St.
  5. Masons and builders are honored by having him as their patron.

St. Louis IX of France

St. Louis was born on April 25, 1215, at Poissy, France, to King Louis VIII and his wife Blanche of Castile. Louis was just 11 years old when he was appointed King, and he was the father of eleven children. He lived an exemplary life, keeping in mind his mother’s words: “I would rather see you dead at my feet than guilty of a terrible sin.” He was an inspiration to others. Without the knowledge of his people, his biographers have written about the many hours he spent in prayer and fasting, as well as in penance and penance.

  • All of Christian Europe in the thirteenth century looked up to him as an international judge, and with good reason.
  • As he would add, “The tranquility and blessings of this realm come to us through the impoverished,” he would explain.
  • The House of the Felles-Dieu for reformed prostitutes (1254), the Quinze-Vingt for 300 blind men (1254), as well as hospitals at Pontoise, Vernon, and Compiégne are just a few of the institutions he established during his lifetime.
  • Louis was a patron of the arts, particularly architecture.

During the Second Crusade, St. Louis died of the plague at Tunis on August 25, 1270, during the course of the campaign. Masons and builders are honored by having him as their patron.

Saint Louis IX

Also referred to as Profile he is the son of King Louis VIII and Queen Blanche of Castile. He became KingofFranceandCountofArtois when he was eleven years old; his mother served as regent until he was 22 years old, after which he reigned for 44 years. The King of France implemented several judicial and legislative changes, fostered Christian faith in France, founded religious institutions, assisted mendicant orders, preached synodal decisions of the Church, constructed leper hospitals, and amassed relics.

In the fight against Emperor Frederick II of Germany, Pope Innocent IV received support.

led two crusades and one death by drowning Born

  • Natural causes claimed his life on August 25, 1270, in Tunis (modern Tunisia)
  • Relics were found in the Basilica of Saint Denis in Paris, France
  • Relics were burned in 1793 during the French Revolution
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relics in the Basilica of Saint Denis, Paris, France; relics burned in 1793during the French Revolution; died on August 25, 1270 in Tunis (modernTunisia); relics in the Basilica of Saint Denis, Paris, France;

  • Natural causes claimed his life on August 25, 1270, in Tunis (modernTunisia)
  • Remains were found in the Basilica of Saint Denis in Paris, France
  • Relics were burnt in 1793 during the French Revolution

Representation

  • Thorny crown of thorns
  • Holding the king with one hand
  • King in possession of a thorny crown nails

Information Supplementary to the above

  • Information Supplemental to the above
  • Archdiocese of Saint Louis
  • Best of Sicily
  • Catholic Cuisine
  • Catholic Exchange
  • Catholic Fire
  • Catholic Gentleman
  • Catholic Ireland
  • Catholic News Agency
  • Catholic World Report
  • Archdiocese of Saint Louis
  • Christian Biographies, by James E Keifer
  • Christian Iconography
  • Cradio
  • Franciscan Media
  • Key to Umbria
  • Christian Biographies, by James E Keifer
  • Key to Umbria Larry Peterson, Regina Magazine, Saints Stories for All Ages, uCatholic, and Wikipedia are some of the resources available.
  • Court of a Saint, by Winifred F Knox
  • Memoirs of the Lord of Joinville, translated by Ethel Wedgewood
  • Saint Louis, by H Wallon
  • Saint Louis, by Marius Sepet
  • Saint Louis, King of France
  • Saint Louis, the Most Christian King, by Frederick Perry
  • The Abbé Christian-Philippe Chanut
  • The Bollandists
  • The Fête des prénoms
  • And other topics.

Readings When it comes to avoiding dissension, never contradict someone unless in cases of wrongdoing or some kind of harm to a neighbor; and when it comes to contradicting others, do so tactfully rather than out of anger or frustration. SaintLouis When you are prosperous, express your gratitude to God with humility and dread, lest you take advantage of God’s blessings and thereby insult him. Saint Louis IX is the ninth Pope of the Roman Catholic Church. As a first and foremost lesson, my darling son, I would like you to love the Lord your God with all of your heart and all of your power.

  • Please keep yourself away from everything that you are aware is offensive to God, which means you must abstain from committing any type of fatal sin.
  • If the Lord has enabled you to go through a trial, accept it gladly and gratefully, remembering that it has occurred for your benefit and that you may have earned it after all.
  • Be compassionate toward the poor, the unfortunate, and those who are afflicted.
  • Thank God for all of the blessings he has placed upon you so that you may be deserving of even bigger blessings in the future.
  • Respect and obedience are due to our mother, theChurch of Rome, and to the Supreme Pontiff, who serves as your spiritual father and guide.
  • Wishing you protection from all evil from the three persons of the Holy Trinity and from all of the saints.

Amen. The following is an excerpt from King Saint Louis IX’s spiritual testament addressed to his son Citation in MLA Format

  • Readings Never oppose someone until it is essential to do so in the event of sin or a threat to a neighbor
  • And when it is necessary to contradict others, do it with tact rather than fury. SaintLouis When you are prosperous, express your gratitude to God with humility and dread, lest you take advantage of God’s blessings and thereby anger him through your arrogance. Count Saint Louis IX (sometimes known as Saint Louis the ninth) To you, my beloved son, my first and foremost admonition is to love the Lord your God with everything that you have in you and with all that you have in your heart. There is no redemption unless this occurs. Please keep yourself away from everything that you are aware is offensive to God, which means you should abstain from committing any type of fatal sin. Prior to committing a fatal sin, you should let yourself to be afflicted by every form of martyrdom that is available to us. Even if God has allowed you to go through a difficult time, accept it gladly and gratefully, knowing that it has happened for your benefit and that you may have merited it. It is important to express gratitude to the Lord in a humble manner and to make certain that you do not suffer as a result of it, whether through foolish pride or anything else, since you should never resist God or offend him in the subject of his gifts. Consider the poor, the unfortunate, and the suffering with a generous spirit. Make every effort to be of assistance and sympathy. You should express gratitude to God for all the blessings he has showered upon you so that you will be worthy of receiving even larger ones in the future. Until you are confident of the facts, always take the side of the poor rather than the affluent in any debate. Respect and obedience are due to our mother, theChurch of Rome, and theSupreme Pontiff, who serves as your spiritual father and guide. I would want to conclude by wishing you every blessing that a loving father can bestow upon his son. Wishing you protection from all evil from the three persons of the Holy Trinity and from all the saints. In addition, may the Lord provide you the strength and courage to carry out his purpose so that he may be served and honored through you, and so that in the next life we may all come to meet Him face to face, love Him, and adore Him without ceasing. Amen. The following is an excerpt from KingSaintLouis IX’s spiritual testament addressed to his son Referencing in the MLA

The School Patron Saint – University of Saint Louis Tuguegarao

(March 9, 1568 – June 21, 1591) was a Renaissance artist. In Northern Italy, Louis (Luigi, Aloysius) Gonzaga was born into a wealthy aristocratic family. He received his early education in the royal court of the famed Medici family in Florence. The young prince joined a royal entourage journeying to Spain, where he served for three years as court page to James, the son of King Philip II, before returning to the United Kingdom (after whom the Philippines was named). During his formative years, he was torn between following the extreme worldliness of the royal courts of his day or striving for better principles.

  • He made the decision to become a priest.
  • In 1585, Louis resigned all of his rights to the family title and estates and entered the Jesuit novitiate in order to further his education.
  • It happened during his final year of priestly studies that a pandemic broke out in the city of Rome.
  • There was almost nothing left of his tired body save skin and bones, as well as horribly infected wounds.
  • His exceptional acts of courage in the service of God and his fellowmen earned him canonization in 1726, and three years later he was named the heavenly patron of all catholic youth, particularly those pursuing academic pursuits, by Pope Paul III.
  • Louis, this magnificent young man, as their patron and role model for students, and our institution is no exception.
  • Louis Gonzaga, who was born on this day in 1541.

Louis IX

During his reign as King of France from 1226 to 1270, Louis IX, commonly known as Saint Louis, (born April 25, 1214, Poissy, France—died August 25, 1270, nearTunis; canonized August 11, 1297, feast day August 25), was the most popular of the Capetian rulers. He was the leader of the Seventh Crusade to the Holy Land in 1248–50, and he died while on a subsequent Crusade to Tunisia.

Early life

Louis was the fourth child of King Louis VIII and his wife, Blanche of Castile, but because the first three died at a young age, Louis, who would go on to have seven more brothers and sisters, was named heir to the kingdom by his father, the King of France. His parents, particularly his mother, showed him a great deal of love and attention as he grew up. Britannica History Quiz: Is it true or false? As you take this quiz, you’ll get more interested in history. You’ll learn the actual story behind the invention of moveable type, who Winston Churchill referred to as “Mum,” and how and when the first sonic boom was heard.

  1. He received instruction in biblical history, geography, and ancient literature from tutors.
  2. Louis was an abominable adolescent who was periodically overcome by episodes of rage, which he attempted to control.
  3. The Albigensianheretics, who were in insurrection against both the church and the state in the south of France, had not been brought under control by the authorities.
  4. Louis VIII was able to put a stop to both the exterior and internal tensions in his court.

Louis IX, who had not yet reached the age of thirteen, ascended to the throne under the regency of his illustrious mother.

Accession to the throne

However, because Louis was the fourth child of King Louis VIII and his queen, Blanche of Castile, and because the previous three children died at a young age, Louis, who would go on to have seven more brothers and sisters, was designated as the heir to the kingdom. Especially his mother, he was reared with a great deal of love and attention. Britannica Take this quiz to find out if history is true or not. While taking this quiz, you will get fascinated by history. To learn the truth about who truly developed moveable type, who Winston Churchill referred to as “Mum,” and when the world’s first sonic boom was heard, read on!

  • His biblical history, geography, and ancient literature were taught to him by tutors in these subjects.
  • Louie was an abominable adolescent who suffered from episodes of rage that he attempted to manage at various times.
  • Despite repeated attempts, the Albigensianheretics in the south of France, who were in insurrection against both church and state, were unable to be subdued.
  • All of these foreign and internal struggles were finally brought to a close by Louis VIII.
  • His mother, Louise, reigned as regent over his young son, Louis IX, who was not yet thirteen.
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Leadership of the SeventhCrusade

Louis was the fourth child of King Louis VIII and his wife, Blanche of Castile, but because the first three died at a young age, Louis, who would go on to have seven more brothers and sisters, was named successor to the kingdom. His parents, particularly his mother, showed him a great deal of love and concern as he grew up. Britannica History: Is it true or false? As this quiz sift through the past, you’ll get obsessed with it. To learn the truth about who truly developed moveable type, who Winston Churchill referred to as “Mum,” and when the world’s first sonic boom was heard, read on.

  • His biblical history, geography, and ancient literature were taught to him by tutors.
  • Louis was an obnoxious adolescent who was periodically possessed by episodes of rage, which he attempted to manage.
  • The Albigensianheretics, who were in insurrection against both the church and the state in the south of France, had not been brought under control.
  • Louis VIII was successful in putting a stop to these foreign and internal strife.

In 1226, Louis VIII devoted his focus to putting down the Albigensian uprising, but he was tragically killed at Montpensier on November 8, 1226, after returning from a successful campaign. Louis IX, who was just 13 at the time, ascended to the throne under the regency of his illustrious mother.

Memorial of St. Louis, King

Optional Memorial Service on August 25th White is the liturgical color, and the patron is white. Saint of barbers and grooms, as well as the city of Saint Louis, Missouri When it comes to religious devotion, mortification, and faith, a monarch takes the lead, and he dies crusading for the King of all lands. “If any choose to become my disciples, let them deny themselves, take up their cross, and follow me,” Jesus stated (Mt 16:24). The saint of today fulfilled Christ’s mandate in two different ways.

  1. On Fridays, he wore a hair cloth, fasted, never spoke God’s name in jest, and refused to crack jokes or even laugh.
  2. Second, he had a fabric cross sewn into his tunic, and as a result, he was designated as a crusader knight.
  3. That clearly visible fabric cross openly announced a man’s resolve to freeing the Holy Land from Muslim domination through a bloody campaign of conquest.
  4. Her remarks stayed with him for the rest of his life.
  5. He married when he was twenty-one, and he and his wife had eleven children in their marriage.
  6. Daily prayers and daily Mass were a part of his routine.
  7. He died in Paris in 1880.

He fought against the Cathars in Southern France and, with the help of the Dominicans and the Inquisition, was successful in putting an end to their heretical movement.

He was well-educated, polite, inquisitive, and really humble in his approach.

He invited the contemplative Saint Thomas Aquinas, who was studying in Paris at the time, over to dine for the pleasure of theological discourse, which he received graciously.

Overall, he was an ideal Christian monarch who reigned over Europe’s golden century during which France was the biggest, most united, and wealthiest country in the world.

However, the first attempt was initially successful, but ended in failure when Louis was captured and his army was defeated in combat.

The second crusade, which he went on, was even worse than the first.

The act of kneeling beside his bed to take Holy Communion was one of his final deeds.

He did not receive his wish in the traditional sense.

In 1297, he was declared a saint.

Saint Louis of France, you were fearless in your devotion to Christ and the Church, no matter what. Provide from heaven some of your same brave spirit to all modern Catholics, encouraging them to be courageous in their lives and propagating the religion, to give without counting the cost.

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: St. Louis IX

Optional Memorial Day Service on August 25th White is the liturgical color. Sacred to barbers and grooms, as well as the city of Saint Louis in Missouri When it comes to religious devotion, mortification, and faith, a king is the leader, and he dies crusading for the King of all lands. ‘If someone wishes to become my disciple, they must deny themselves, take up their cross, and follow me,’ Jesus stated (Mt 16:24). Saint of the day accomplished two things in accordance with Christ’s mandate. In the first place, and perhaps most clearly, King Louis IX of France (also known as Saint Louis) picked up his cross by engaging in severe bodily mortifications throughout his life.

  • He would not tell jokes or even laugh on those days.
  • The order to “take up their cross” was believed by Louis and countless other medieval knights to be accomplished not just via bodily mortification but also by wading into battle with the sign of Christ on their chests.
  • When Louis was a youngster, his mother told him, “I would rather see you dead at my feet than that you should ever commit a fatal sin.” “I would rather see you dead at my feet than that you should ever commit a mortal sin,” she said.
  • Because of his father’s early death, Louis was crowned, or anointed, king in what was essentially a liturgical ritual, the major features of which may still be observed at modern coronations today.
  • Jesus and the Church were the only things that mattered to him.
  • He also built magnificent cathedrals like as Paris’ Saint Chapelle to hold his extensive collection of relics, which included the genuine Cross of Christ.
  • Blasphemy caused him such distress that he established legislation mandating that all those who commit it be branded on the lips.

The Cathars of Southern France were destroyed by him and his allies, the Dominicans and the Inquisition, who worked together to put an end to the heretical movement.

He was well-educated, kind, inquisitive, and really modest in his actions.

Saint Thomas Aquinas, who was studying in Paris at the time, was asked to dinner by him because he enjoyed the thrill of theological discussion.

Overall, he was an ideal Christian monarch who reigned over Europe’s golden century during which France was the largest, most united, and richest country in the world.

Louis was captured and his army was annihilated in combat during the first campaign, which appeared to be successful at first.

Even more destructive was his second crusade, which he went on after that.

They had just recently began their expedition and had only just arrived.

A martyr or confessor for the faith had been his ambition all along.

The heroic and centuries-long struggle to reconquer Jerusalem and the Holy Land for Christian pilgrims did, however, require him to lay down his life in self-sacrifice.

The love you had for Christ and the Church, Saint Louis of France, was unwavering. Provide from heaven some of your same bold spirit to all modern Catholics, encouraging them to be courageous in their lives and propagating the faith, and to contribute without considering the cost of their sacrifice.

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Optional Memorial Service on August 25. White is the liturgical color, and the patron is white as well. Barbers, grooms, and the city of Saint Louis, Missouri When it comes to religious devotion, mortification, and faith, a monarch takes the lead, and he dies crusading for the King of all lands “If any wish to become my disciples, let them deny themselves, take up their cross, and follow me,” Jesus stated (Mt 16:24). Saint of the day complied with Christ’s mandate in two ways. First and foremost, King Louis IX of France, often known as Saint Louis, picked up his cross by engaging in rigorous bodily mortifications throughout his life.

Second, he had a fabric cross sewn into his tunic, therefore establishing himself as a knight crusader.

That clearly visible fabric symbol openly declared a man’s intention to freeing the Holy Land from Muslim dominion through a bloody fight.

Her words stayed with him forever.

He married when he was twenty-one, and he and his wife had eleven children throughout their lifetime.

Daily prayers and daily Mass were a part of his routine.

Blasphemy caused him such distress that he established legislation mandating that all those who commit it be branded on the lips.

Louis possessed an enigmatic magnetism that compelled people to not only be in his company but also to touch him on the body.

Every man was his companion.

He enacted legislation that upheld the assumption of innocence and the right to a fair trial for everybody.

The brave, though reckless, choice to personally lead two crusades was taken by Louis XIV despite his reputation and the luxuries of his house.

Only a king’s ransom was sufficient to ensure his release.

King Louis died of typhus, along with many of the troops in his camp, on the coast of modern-day Tunisia, having just recently began their trek across the Mediterranean.

A martyr or confessor for the faith had been his ambition from the beginning.

However, he did so in the noble, centuries-long, and ultimately futile endeavor to reconquer Jerusalem and the Holy Land for the purpose of Christian pilgrimage.

The love you had for Christ and the Church was unwavering, Saint Louis of France. Allow heaven to impart to all modern Catholics some of your same brave spirit—to be fearless in living and spreading the faith, to contribute without hesitation, and to do so without counting the cost.

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