What Is Saint John’s Wort

ST. JOHN’S WORT: Overview, Uses, Side Effects, Precautions, Interactions, Dosing and Reviews

With golden, star-shaped blossoms, St. John’s wort is a plant native to Europe that is also used in herbal medicine. It is commonly used to treat depression, but it can have significant interactions with other medications. The herb St. John’s wort was given its name in honor of John the Baptist. It is customary for the plant to begin flowering around the 24th of June, which is the feast day of St. John the Baptist. The substance contains a variety of substances that operate on messengers in the brain that control mood.

John’s wort is prescribed are depression and mood disorders.

St.

In the United States, St.

  • France, on the other hand, has prohibited its usage in goods due to worries about medication interactions.
  • John’s wort may only be obtained with a doctor’s prescription.
  • It is not intended to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects, and it is not intended to cover all possible side effects and interactions.
  • As a result of whatever you have read on WebMD, you should never postpone or disregard getting professional medical advice from your doctor or another competent health care practitioner.
  • Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version has authorized permission to use this protected content.
  • Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version is a source of professional medical information on natural medicines.

St. John’s Wort

  • There has been no evidence of harm from taking St. John’s wort by mouth for as long as 12 weeks, according to research studies. St. John’s wort, on the other hand, interacts with a wide range of medications, making it potentially unsafe for many people, particularly those who take conventional medications
  • St. John’s wort can weaken the effects of a wide range of medications, including critically important medications such as
  • Antidepressants, birth control pills, cyclosporine, which stops the body from rejecting donated organs, and other medications are available. Some cardiac drugs, such as digoxin and ivabradine, are prescribed. Some HIV medications, such as indinavir and nevirapine
  • And Some cancer drugs, such as irinotecan and imatinib, are available. Warfarin, an anticoagulant (blood thinner)
  • Some statins, such as simvastatin
  • And a number of other medications.
  • Taking St. John’s wort in conjunction with some antidepressants or other medications that influence serotonin, a neurotransmitter generated by nerve cells, may result in an increase in serotonin-related adverse effects, some of which may be potentially life-threatening. It is possible that St. John’s wort, especially when taken in excessive dosages, can produce greater sensitivity to sunlight. Other adverse effects may include insomnia, anxiety, dry mouth, dizziness, gastrointestinal issues, exhaustion, headache, or sexual dysfunction
  • However, these are not all possible. When it comes to using St. John’s wort topically, there isn’t enough credible information available to determine if it is safe. It has the potential to produce serious skin responses when exposed to the sun
  • It is not known whether or not it is safe to take St. John’s wort during pregnancy or during nursing. In experimental animals, it has been shown to induce birth abnormalities. Lactating moms who use St. John’s wort may experience colic, sleepiness, and fussiness in their newborns.

St. John’s Wort and Depression: In Depth

  • It has been known for generations that St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum), a plant that grows in the wild, may be used to treat mental health disorders. Throughout Europe, St. John’s wort is commonly recommended for depression
  • In the United States, St. John’s Wort is sold as a dietary supplement because the criteria for selling supplements are less stringent than the rules for selling prescription or over-the-counter pharmaceuticals.

More information on St. John’s wort may be found on the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) Web page dedicated to the herb.

AboutDepression

Depression (sometimes known as major depressive disorder or clinical depression) is a common yet devastating mood illness that affects millions of people every year. It produces severe symptoms that interfere with your ability to sleep, eat, and do daily tasks like as working or going to the bathroom.

In 2015, over 7% of individuals in the United States reported having experienced at least one episode of serious depression in the previous year. Depression manifests itself in a variety of ways, including the following:

  • Feeling depressed or nervous on a regular or constant basis
  • Not wishing to participate in things that used to be enjoyable
  • Having a bad mood, being easily annoyed, or being restless
  • I’m having trouble sleeping and I’m feeling exhausted. having a larger or smaller appetite than normal, or having no appetite
  • Experiencing pain that does not improve despite medical intervention
  • Affective difficulties such as difficulty concentrating, remembering information, or making judgments
  • Having a sense of remorse, worthlessness, or helplessness
  • Thinking of committing suicide or harming oneself

In order to treat depression, antidepressants and various forms of psychotherapy are used. More information about depression may be found on the Depression page of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) website.

What the Science Says About the Effectiveness of St.John’s Wort forDepression

The findings of trials on the efficacy of St. John’s wort in the treatment of depression have been inconsistent.

  • In research on the usefulness of St. John’s wort in the treatment of depression, the results have been contradictory.

St. John’s wort

The blooming shrub St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) is endemic to Europe and grows in a variety of habitats. The fact that it blooms on the birthday of the historical figure John the Baptist lends it its name to this blooming plant. St. John’s wort has active compounds such as hyperforin, which may be found in both the flowers and the leaves. St. John’s wort is available as a dietary supplement in a variety of forms, including teas, pills, liquids, and topical formulations. St. John’s wort is used to treat depression as well as menopausal symptoms in women.

Evidence

It is a blooming plant that is native to Europe and is known as St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum). The fact that it blooms on the birthday of the historical figure John the Baptist lends it its name to this blooming flower. Inactive components such as hyperforin can be found in the flowers and leaves of St. John’s wort. In the form of teas, pills, liquids, and topical applications, St. John’s wort is accessible as a dietary supplement. Those suffering from depression or menopausal symptoms may benefit from taking St.

  • Depression. The therapeutic effect of St. John’s wort in the treatment of mild to moderate depression has been demonstrated in a number of trials. As a matter of fact, several studies have found that the supplement is just as effective as numerous prescription antidepressants. It is still unknown if it is effective in the treatment of severe depression. Because St. John’s wort interacts with a wide range of medicines, it may not be the best choice for everyone, especially if you use any prescription medications.
  • Menopausal symptoms are a common occurrence. Taken alone or in conjunction with other herbs, such as black cohosh, some research shows that St. John’s wort may help to alleviate menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes and somatic symptom disorder. St. John’s wort appears to be effective in the treatment of this disorder, which produces significant worry over physical symptoms such as pain, weakness, or shortness of breath
  • Nevertheless, further research is needed.

Our take

St. John’s wort has shown to be useful in the treatment of mild to moderate depression in certain people. However, the supplement has been shown to interact with a wide range of drugs and to produce significant negative effects in some cases. You should see your doctor before taking St. John’s wort if you are taking any other drugs at the same time.

Safety and side effects

St. John’s wort is usually believed to be safe when taken orally for up to 12 weeks at suitable quantities. However, it has the potential to cause:

  • A feeling of agitation and anxiety, dizziness, diarrhea, constipation, and stomach discomfort, as well as dry mouth

Other possible adverse effects include:

  • The following are possible adverse effects:

When it comes to the safety of using St. John’s wort topically, there isn’t enough information available. Use of St. John’s wort is not recommended during pregnancy or while nursing.

Interactions

Some well-known interactions are included in the following list. Other medications, on the other hand, may have an adverse reaction to St. John’s wort. It is recommended that you consult your doctor before using St. John’s wort in conjunction with any other medicine, especially prescription pharmaceuticals.

  • Some of the more well-known interactions are listed here. In addition to St. John’s wort, additional medications may interact with it. Prior to utilizing St. John’s wort in conjunction with any other medications, particularly prescription medications, see your doctor.

13th of February, 2021

  1. St. John’s wort is a herbal remedy. Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health). Accessed on January 17, 2021
  2. St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum). Natural Medicines. Accessed on January 17, 2021
  3. St. John’s wort. FactsComparisons eAnswers (accessed on January 17, 2021). On the 17th of January, 2021, I was able to access St. John’s wort through IBM Microdemex. Kellerman RD, et al., accessed on January 17, 2021
  4. Kellerman RD, et al. Herbs and nutritional supplements that are widely used. Conn’s Current Therapy 2021 is a reference book about current therapy. The year is 2021, and Elsevier is the publisher. On the 17th of January, 2021, it was accessible.

‘St. John’s Wort,’ as the name suggests. Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health): St. John’s wort. Natural Medicines. Accessed on January 17, 2021. Statistics, comparisons, and explanations of St. John’s wort. Accessed on January 17, 2021; factscomparisonseanswers. St. John’s wort (IBM Microdemex), accessed on January 17, 2021; On the 17th of January, 2021, Kellerman RD and colleagues (Kellerman RD and colleagues) accessed The most widely used herbs and dietary supplements are listed below.

Current Therapy 2021, edited by Conn. Twenty-first century publishing house Elsevier On the 17th of January, 2021, accessed

St. John’s Wort: The Benefits and the Dangers

The herb St. John’s wort. Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health) Accessed on January 17, 2021; St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum), Natural Medicines. Accessed on January 17, 2021; St. John’s wort. FactsComparisons eAnswers (accessed on January 17, 2021); St. John’s wort (IBM Microdemex), accessed on January 17, 2021. Kellerman RD, et al. (accessed January 17, 2021); Kellerman RD, et al. Herbs and nutritional supplements that are popular nowadays.

Elsevier Publishing Company; 2021.

St. John’s Wort: Benefits, Side Effects & More

A large number of clinical trials have been carried out to determine the effectiveness of St. John’s Wort in the treatment of depression. If you’ve been browsing the web or reading your local newspaper, you’ve definitely come across some information on herbal supplements, such as St. John’s wort, and its use in the treatment of depression. While hundreds of people swear by St. John’s wort, many medical professionals still regard it as an alternative treatment option for some ailments. St. John’s Wort (also known as John’s Wort) St.

  • However, it has been used for medicinal reasons in other regions of the world for thousands of years, including Europe and Asia.
  • John’s wort is named after St.
  • Some of these research suggest that St.
  • According to two trials conducted in the United States, St.
  • The full health advantages of St.
  • The following information, however, will be useful if you do decide to make use of the service.
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How do I take St. John’s wort?

The usefulness of St. John’s Wort in the treatment of depression has been the subject of several clinical research. If you’ve spent any time on the internet or reading your local newspaper, you’ve definitely come across some information on herbal supplements, such as St. John’s wort, and its role in the treatment of depression. Despite the fact that dozens of people swear by it, many specialists still believe St. John’s wort to be an alternative medicine. Holy Basil (also known as “St John’s Wort”) In other areas of the globe, St.

St.

John the Baptist (since it blooms around the time of his feast day), and it is always being researched to see if it can exhibit any of its supposed health advantages, which are numerous.

John’s wort is more effective than a placebo (sugar tablet) and as effective as prescription antidepressants.

John’s wort was no better than a placebo in terms of treatment efficacy. Ongoing research is being done to determine the real advantages of St. John’s wort. The following information, however, will be useful if you do decide to make use of it:

  • A large number of clinical trials have been undertaken to determine the efficacy of St. John’s Wort in the treatment of depression. If you’ve been browsing the web or reading your local newspaper, you’ve definitely come across some information on herbal supplements, such as St. John’s wort, and its role in the treatment of depression. Despite the fact that dozens of people swear by it, St. John’s wort is still regarded as an alternative medicine by many professionals. The herb St. John’s Wort St. John’s wort is a wild yellow flower that is considered a weed in much of the United States, although it has been used for medicinal reasons in other areas of the world for thousands of years. St. John’s wort is named after St. John the Baptist (since it blooms around the time of his feast day), and it is constantly being researched in order to establish its supposed health advantages. According to some of these research, St. John’s wort may be more effective than a placebo (sugar tablet) and as effective as prescription antidepressants in the treatment of moderate depression. In two trials conducted in the United States, researchers discovered that St. John’s wort was no more effective than a placebo in treating moderate to severe depression. There is still more research to be done on the genuine advantages of St. John’s wort. If you do decide to utilize it, though, there are a few things you should be aware of.

What are the potential benefits of using St. John’s wort?

  • Depression symptoms are less noticeable
  • Menopausal symptoms are less noticeable. It can aid in wound healing when administered topically to the skin as a lotion.

What should I watch out for if I use St. John’s wort?

  • Increased sensitivity to the sun, particularly if you are fair-skinned and taking high dosages of the medication
  • Hypertension (high blood pressure)

It is not recommended to use St. John’s wort during pregnancy or when nursing a child. St. John’s wort has been linked to extremely significant and even deadly interactions with a wide range of commonly prescribed medications. St. John’s wort has the potential to impair the effectiveness of other medications, including antidepressants, birth control pills, cyclosporine (an anti-rejection drug), digoxin (a heart medication), HIV treatments, cancer therapies, and blood thinners such as Coumadin, among others.

  • John’s wort in conjunction with antidepressant medications.
  • It is important to inform your doctor or pharmacist if you are using St.
  • St.
  • Get useful, helpful, and relevant health and wellness information and news sent to your inbox.

More health news + info

It has long been believed that St. John’s wort has therapeutic properties, particularly in the treatment of depression, although this has not been proven. Aside from that, it looks to possess antibacterial qualities and may even have antiviral characteristics. St. John’s wort, also known as Perforate St. John’s wort, Tipton’s Weed, or Klamath weed, is a herb that originates from a flowering plant calledHypericum perforatum (also known as Perforate St. John’s wort). It is available in a variety of forms, including teas, pills, capsules, and a topical therapy.

  1. Other components, such as hyperforin and flavonoids, may also have an impact on the outcome.
  2. John’s wort has been shown to interact adversely with several prescription medications, therefore caution should be exercised when using it, and any usage should be addressed with a health care practitioner beforehand.
  3. Pin it to your Pinterest board.
  4. John’s wort is a plant that has antidepressant and perhaps antiviral properties, among other things.
  5. John the Baptist, whose feast day (the 24th of June) coincides when the plant is in full bloom, hence earning the moniker “St.
  6. John the Baptist, which is historically celebrated on the plant’s leaves.
  7. John’s beheading.

John during the Crusades to cure the injured.

St.

In medieval times, it was employed for the purpose of “pushing out the inner demon.” The plant was prescribed by Paracelsus, a 16th-century philosopher, for treating hallucinations and “dragons,” as well as for mending wounds.

John’s wort were first documented in scientific literature in 1959 and 1971, respectively.

Nowadays, St.

In the last 20 years, the medicinal use of cannabis has increased in other parts of the world.

According to the findings of a 2016 evaluation of research, St.

Researchers noted, however, that the data was hampered by a paucity of study into the use of the medication for severe depression and a failure to disclose adverse events to the FDA.

St.

The herb is most commonly used in tablet or capsule form, although it is also available in teabags and other forms.

St.

The herb appears to be as effective as tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) in the treatment of mild-to-moderate major depression in short-term trials lasting up to 12 weeks.

John’s wort studies that compare it to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as Prozac (fluoxetine) or Zoloft (sertraline), are few and far between, but there is some evidence that the herb may be as effective as these drugs while having fewer side effects, according to some evidence.

  1. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a condition in which a person has difficulty paying attention.
  2. John’s wort could be “somewhat beneficial” in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), however other studies revealed that it was ineffective.
  3. Anxiety disorder: There is insufficient data to conclude that St.
  4. Atopic dermatitis: According to the findings of a study on the efficacy of hypericum cream, mild to moderate atopic dermatitis may react well to topical therapy.
  5. St.
  6. HIV: Although some animal research have shown that St.

In order to avoid the possibility of medication interactions, the use of St. John’s wort for HIV or AIDS is not suggested. St. John’s wort has also been studied for its potential benefits in the following areas:

  • It has long been believed that St. John’s wort has therapeutic properties, particularly in the treatment of depression, although this has not been confirmed. Aside from that, it appears to possess antibacterial and maybe antiviral activities. St. John’s wort, also known as Perforate St. John’s wort, Tipton’s Weed, or Klamath weed, is a flowering plant that grows in the Hypericum perforatum family. This herbal remedy is available in a variety of forms including teas, pills, capsules, and topical applications. The active component hypericin is found in the plant, and it is possible that this is what provides the herb with the majority of its medicinal properties. Various other components, such as hyperforin and flavonoids, may also have an impact. Due to the potential risk of St. John’s wort when combined with some prescription medications, extreme caution should be exercised when using it, and any usage should be addressed with a health-care practitioner before beginning. As well as increased photosensitivity, or sun sensitivity, stomach discomfort and allergic responses might occur as a result of this medication. Pin it to your Pinterest boards. It is believed that St John’s Wort has antidepressant and maybe antiviral properties, however this is not confirmed. It is named after St. John the Baptist, whose feast day is celebrated on June 24, the same day that the plant is in full bloom. On August 29th in the northern hemisphere, red stains are believed to develop on the plant’s leaves, commemorating the date of the death of St. John the Baptist, which is historically observed on the plant’s leaves. Blood was allegedly spilled at St. John’s beheading, and the red dots are claimed to reflect this. According to legend, the Knights of St. John used the plant to cure the injured during the Crusades. It’s not understood exactly how it works, but the effect it has on the brain may be comparable to that of an antidepressant such as fluoxetine or Prozac, in that it increases the availability of certain neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine (the happy hormone). Historically, St. John’s wort has been used in folk medicine to treat a variety of ailments, most notably wounds and cuts. When it was first introduced, it was supposed to “drive out the inner demon.” An ancient philosopher, Paracelsus, advocated the plant for treating hallucinations and “dragons,” as well as for mending cuts and wounds in the 16th century. The antibacterial activities of St. John’s wort were first documented in 1959 and again in 1971. Hyperforin, an antibacterial compound found in the plant, was isolated and tested. Modern-day usage of St. John’s wort, particularly in Germany, as a herbal cure for depression has become widespread throughout Europe. In the last 20 years, its therapeutic application has expanded around the world. There is no FDA approval for it as an over-the-counter (OTC) or prescription medicine to treat depression in the United States (U.S.), according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). St. John’s Wort is superior to aplacebo in the treatment of mild to severe depression, according to a study published in 2016. Researchers noted, however, that the data was weak due to a lack of study on the use of the treatment for severe depression and a lack of reporting of adverse events in the clinical trial. Not all of the research, on the other hand, was consistently trustworthy. St. John’s wort is accessible over-the-counter in the majority of nations, however in other countries, such as Ireland, a prescription is necessary. The herb is most commonly used in tablet or capsule form, although it is also available as teabags and capsules. Tinctures, which are medicinal extracts in an alcohol solution, are used topically for topical treatment. There have been a variety of studies conducted on St. John’s wort, with various conclusions. Depressive disorder: Short-term trials, lasting up to 12 weeks, have shown that the herb is more effective than a placebo and as effective as tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) in the treatment of mild-to-moderate major depression. St. John’s wort studies that compare it to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as Prozac (fluoxetine) or Zoloft (sertraline), are few and few between, but there is some indication that the herb may be as beneficial as these treatments while having fewer adverse effects, if not none at all. Evidence to support its usage in children does not exist at this time. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a condition in which a person has excessive amounts of energy but little concentration. One tiny research showed that St. John’s wort could be “somewhat beneficial” in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), however other studies concluded that it was ineffective. The possibility that it will aggravate symptoms has been raised in some circles. In the case of anxiety disorder, there is insufficient evidence to conclude that St. John’s wort is beneficial, and it may even exacerbate symptoms. Atopic dermatitis: According to the findings of a study on the efficacy of hypericum cream, mild to moderate atopic dermatitis may react well to topical therapy of this condition. People who suffer from somatoform diseases have physical symptoms that are not caused by an organic condition. It is possible that St. John’s wort can be used to treat some of these conditions, but further research is required. Although some animal research have shown that St. John’s wort may have antiviral properties, one human experiment has found that this is not the case. Because of the possibility of medication interactions, the use of St. John’s wort for HIV or AIDS is not advised. St. John’s wort has also been studied for its potential use in the following areas:
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In order to validate its efficacy, further proof is required. As a rule of thumb, 300 milligrams (mg) three times a day with meals is the recommended dose in capsule or dry tablet form. This is intended for adults. It is not suggested for youngsters under the age of 18. If there are any adverse effects, they may include the following:

  • Anxiety, dizziness, dry mouth, headache, light sensitivity, restlessness, sedation, sexual dysfunction, skin problems, stomach trouble, lethargy or exhaustion are all possible side effects.

It may take 3 to 6 weeks before you see any difference. St. John’s wort should be discontinued gradually in order to avoid any negative effects on the body. St. John’s wort should not be used as a substitute to medical treatment for depression in those who have been diagnosed with the condition by their doctor. It’s possible that depression will deepen if the herb is ineffective. When using St. John’s wort, patients should avoid taking the following drugs, since their effectiveness may be reduced as a result of their use:

  • Anticonvulsants, cyclosporine, digoxin, oral contraceptives, several anti-HIV medications, theophylline, warfarin, and other medications

St. John’s wort may enhance the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants. This can result in a potentially dangerous spike in serotonin levels in the body. Among the signs and symptoms are:

  • Tremors, diarrhea, disorientation, muscular rigidity, and a low body temperature are all possible symptoms.

It has the potential to be deadly. St. John’s wort has been shown to cause psychosis in certain individuals. People suffering from bipolar illness or serious depression should avoid using it since it may cause a mania. It can also enhance the effects of triptan medications, such as sumatriptan, that are used to treat migraines. It is not yet known whether or not St. John’s wort is safe to consume during pregnancy or when nursing a newborn. When considering taking St. John’s wort or any other supplements or alternative therapies, patients should always consult with their doctor first, especially if they are already taking medications.

According to a study released in 2015, because St John’s wort has a profile that is similar to that of fluoxetine, it can also cause the same adverse responses as the drug.

St. John’s wort

Many pharmaceuticals can interact with St. John’s wort, and when certain medications are taken at the same time, significant drug interactions can occur, resulting in death. If you use other medications on a daily basis, you should consult your doctor before taking St. John’s wort. While taking St. John’s wort, stay out of the sun as much as possible. This product has the potential to make you more susceptible to sunburn.

What is St. John’s wort?

St. John’s wort is a plant that is also known by the names Amber, Barbe de Saint-Jean, Chasse-diable, Demon Chaser, Fuga Daemonum, Goatweed, Hardhay, and other variations of these names. Shea Butter, Herbe à la Brûlure, Herbe à Mille Trous, Herbe à Mille Vertus, Herbe à Piqûres, Herbe de Saint Éloi, Herbe de la Saint-Jean, Herbe du Charpentier, Herbe Percée, Hierba de San Juan, Hypereikon, Hyperici Herba, Hypericum perforatum, Klamath Weed, Millepertuis St. John’s wort has long been recognized in alternative medicine as a safe and effective treatment for mild to severe depression, as well as its accompanying symptoms such as anxiety and sleeplessness.

Topical versions of St.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), social anxiety, hepatitis C, irritable bowel syndrome, diabetic nerve pain, and burning mouth syndrome are among conditions for which St.

Despite this, research has revealed that St.

Aside from anxiety disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), other uses have included premenstrual syndrome (PMS), seasonal affective disorder (SAD), genital herpes or cold sores, sciatic nerve pain, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, migraine headaches, smoking cessation, and other conditions that have not been proven through research It is not known whether or if St.

The Food and Drug Administration has not authorized the use of this product for medical purposes.

John’s wort should not be taken in place of the prescription provided to you.

John’s wort is a plant that is frequently offered as a dietary supplement.

The purchase of herbal/health supplements should be made from a reputable supplier in order to reduce the danger of contamination. St. John’s wort can be used for a variety of other applications that are not covered in this product guide.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking St. John’s wort?

Many pharmaceuticals can interact with St. John’s wort, and when certain medications are taken at the same time, significant drug interactions can occur, resulting in death. Do not use St. John’s wort without seeing a doctor if you routinely use other medications, especially if you have a medical condition.

  • Medicines for depression and anxiety
  • Asthma and allergy medications
  • Cough and cold medications
  • Cancer medicine (chemotherapy)
  • Cholesterol medications
  • Erectile dysfunction medications
  • Heart or blood pressure medications
  • HIV or AIDS medications
  • Medicine to prevent organ transplant rejection
  • Medicine to treat any type of infection (including HIV, fungal infections, malaria, or tuberculosis)
  • Medicine to treat psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other autoimmune diseases
  • And medicine to treat psori

If you have any of the following conditions, consult with your doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare practitioner to determine if it is safe for you to take this product:

  • Symptoms of severe depression or bipolar disorder (manic depression)
  • Schizophrenia or other mental disease
  • Alzheimer’s dementia
  • Or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, particularly if you are using methylphenidate (Ritalin).

St. John’s wort has the potential to damage an unborn child. If you are pregnant, you should not take this product without consulting a doctor. The herb St. John’s wort has been shown to reduce the effectiveness of birth control tablets. For non-hormonal birth control (such as a condom or diaphragm laced with spermicide) to prevent conception, consult with your doctor. The herb St. John’s wort may have an effect on fertility (your ability to have children). If you are attempting to conceive, you should avoid using this product altogether.

John’s wort has the potential to enter into breast milk and induce adverse consequences in a breastfeeding infant.

It is not recommended to offer St.

When used for up to 8 weeks, St.

How should I take St. John’s wort?

In the event that you are considering the use of herbal supplements, consult with your doctor first. You could also think about talking with a practitioner who is well-versed in the usage of herbal remedies and health supplements. If you decide to use St. John’s wort, make sure to follow the directions on the container or those provided by your doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare professional. Make sure you do not use more of this product than what is indicated on the package. It is not recommended to use St.

  1. The use of many formulations at the same time increases the likelihood of an overdose.
  2. John’s wort first thing in the morning.
  3. John’s wort orally.
  4. Taking St.
  5. If you are about to have surgery, you should cease taking St.
  6. Do not hesitate to contact your doctor if the problem you are treating with St.

John’s wort does not improve or if it worsens while you are taking this supplement. Moisture, heat, and light should all be avoided when storing this product. St. John’s wort might become inactive if it is exposed to light for an extended period of time.

What happens if I miss a dose?

If it is almost time for your next scheduled dosage, you should skip the missed dose. It is not necessary to take more St. John’s wort to make up for a missed dosage.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek immediate medical treatment or dial 1-800-222-1222 to reach the Poison Help hotline for assistance.

What should I avoid while taking St. John’s wort?

It is not recommended to use St. John’s wort with other herbal or health products without seeing a doctor first. Avoid direct sunlight or tanning beds if at all possible. St. John’s wort has the potential to make you more susceptible to sunburn. When you’re out in the sun, make sure to dress in protective clothes and wear sunscreen (SPF 30 or above). St. John’s wort should not be taken in conjunction with other medications that might make you more sensitive to sunlight, such as antibiotic medications or sulfa drugs.

What are the possible side effects of St. John’s wort?

If you have any of the following symptoms of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat, get emergency medical attention. Although not all negative effects have been identified, St. John’s wort is considered to be safe when taken by an adult for up to 12 weeks or by a kid aged 6-17 for up to 8 weeks, according to the National Institutes of Health. When eaten in big quantities, St. John’s wort may be hazardous to one’s health. If you develop any of the following symptoms, stop using St.

  • Skin rash or irritation that is extremely painful or itchy
  • Severe sunburn (redness, burning, blistering) after being outside
  • Or (if you are also taking an antidepressant or narcotic pain medicine) Excitation, hallucinations, fever, rapid heart rate, hyperactive reflexes, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, lack of coordination, fainting

The following are examples of common side effects:

  • Sleep disturbances (insomnia), weird nightmares, etc. you’re feeling nervous, agitated, or restless Irritation of the mouth, stomach, and bowels
  • A rash on the skin, tingling sensation
  • Headaches, disorientation, or other symptoms a sensation of exhaustion

The following is not a comprehensive list of possible side effects, and more may occur. For medical advice concerning side effects, consult with your doctor. You can report adverse effects to the Food and Drug Administration at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect St. John’s wort?

Many medicines have the potential to interact with St. John’s wort, and certain pharmaceuticals should not be used in conjunction with this herb. This covers prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and herbal supplements, among other things. This drug guide does not include a comprehensive list of all probable interactions. Inform your doctor of all medications you are taking, as well as any medications you begin or stop taking while receiving therapy with St. John’s wort. Provide a list of all of your medications to every healthcare practitioner who serves you, including your primary care physician.

Where can I get more information?

If you are considering using any herbal or health supplement, consult with a licensed healthcare professional first. Regardless of whether you are being treated by a medical doctor or a practitioner who is trained in the use of natural medicines/supplements, make sure that all of your healthcare providers are aware of all of your medical conditions and medications. Remember to keep this and all other medications out of the reach of children, never share your medications with others, and only use this medication for the indication that has been prescribed for it.

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  2. In order to ensure that Multum information is appropriate for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States, Multum does not warrant that its use outside of the United States is appropriate, unless explicitly stated otherwise.
  3. In addition to serving as a supplement to, rather than a substitute for, licensed healthcare practitioners’ expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgment, Multum’s drug information is also intended to serve consumers.
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  5. Not all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects are covered by the information contained in this document.

If you have any questions about the medications you are taking, you should consult your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist for answers. Copyright is protected from 1996 to 2021. Cerner Multum, Inc. is a computer software company. Version number: 5.01. Date of last revision: 2/16/2015.

St. John’s Wort

People in European nations have been using St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) for millennia to cure mild to severe depression. It is a plant with yellow blossoms. It is available as a dietary supplement in the United States, where it may be purchased from health food stores and pharmacies alike.

What is St. John’s wort used for?

Short-term therapy of mild to moderate depression with St. John’s wort is possible with this herb. It may take up to 2 to 3 weeks for St. John’s wort to start working to alleviate depressed symptoms in some people. The effects of St. John’s wort formulations differ from one another. A standardized version of St. John’s wort means that the quantity of the herb is the same in every capsule.

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Is St. John’s wort safe?

It is believed that St. John’s wort is less likely to induce side effects (such as stomach pain or headaches) than antidepressant medications, yet it may create a rash if exposed to sunlight. St. John’s wort may interfere with the effectiveness of medications used to treat other disorders, such as AIDS. In order for your doctor or pharmacist to assess whether or not St. John’s wort will conflict with any other medications you are currently taking, it is critical that you inform them of your intention to use the herbal remedy.

  • Compared to antidepressant medications, St. John’s wort has fewer side effects (such as stomach pain or headaches), yet it may produce an allergic reaction if exposed to the sun. St. John’s wort may interfere with the effectiveness of medications used to treat other conditions, such as AIDS, when taken together. In order for your doctor or pharmacist to assess whether or not St. John’s wort will conflict with any other medications you are already taking, it is critical that you inform them of your intention to use the herb before you begin.

Nutritional supplements are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the same way that prescription medications are regulated. A dietary supplement can be sold even if there has been little or no study on how effective it is. It is important to inform your doctor if you are taking any dietary supplements or are considering mixing them with your current traditional medical treatment plan. In some cases, abandoning traditional medical therapy in favor of solely taking nutritional supplements is not recommended.

The following points should be kept in mind when using dietary supplements:

  • Dietary supplements, like traditional drugs, may have adverse effects, create allergic responses, or interact with prescription and nonprescription medications, as well as with other supplements you may be taking at the same time. Other health concerns may be exacerbated as a result of a side effect or combination with another medication or supplement. It is possible that the production of dietary supplements is not standardized. This implies that the effectiveness of the drugs, as well as any adverse effects they may induce, may vary between brands or even between different lots of the same brand. It’s possible that the version you buy in health food or grocery stores is not the same as the type utilized in scientific studies. The long-term effects of the majority of dietary supplements, with the exception of vitamins and minerals, are not well understood. Many dietary supplements are not utilized over an extended period of time

References

  • P.B. Bongiorno and M.T. Murray (2013). Medicinal herb Hypericum perforatum (often known as St. John’s wort). Pages 833–841 in JE Pizzorno & MT Murray, editors, Textbook of Natural Medicine, 4th ed., JE Pizzorno et al. Mosby
  • Linde K, et al., St. Louis, MO (2008). The herb St. John’s wort is used to treat serious depression. St. John’s wort, according to the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (4). (2010). A DerMarderosian and colleagues (eds.) published Review of Natural Products. Szegedi, A., et al., eds., St. Louis: Wolters Kluwer Health (2005). Randomized controlled double-blind non-inferiority trial of hypericum extract WS 5570 (St. John’s wort) vs paroxetine for the treatment of moderate to severe depression in the acute phase BMJ 330(7490): 503–508
  • BMJ 330(7490): 503–508

Credits

As of September 23, 2020, the information is current. Healthwise Staff is the author of this article. Adam Husney, MD, is a Family Medicine specialist who has been reviewed. As of September 23, 2020, the information is current.

What Is St. John’s Wort Used For and Can It Benefit You?

Known for its vivid yellow blossoms, St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) is a flowering plant belonging to the Hypericaceae family. It is reported to bloom for the first time around the time of St. John the Baptist’s birthday, thus it is also known as St. John’s wort. In Old English, the term “wort” literally translates as “plant.”

Commonly Known As

  • St. John’s wort (also known as John’s wort)
  • St. John’s wort (also known as John’s wort)
  • ‘Hypericum’ is derived from the scientific name. Goatweed
  • Klamath weed is a kind of plant native to the United States. Tipton weed is a kind of plant that grows in Tipton, England.

St. John’s wort has been used medicinally for hundreds of years. Today, the widely utilized herb is frequently employed in the treatment of depression-related symptoms. Jessica Olah’s song “Verywell”

Health Benefits

Saint John’s wort is commonly considered to improve mood and give some relief from depression, although the specific mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood. Researchers believe that the herb’s active compounds (hypericin and hyperforin) may have the potential to enhance levels of certain brain neurotransmitters, such as serotonin. People suffering from depression frequently have low amounts of serotonin and other neurotransmitters in their bodies. One reason why individuals may choose to try St.

John’s wort as a natural cure for depression (as opposed to pharmaceuticals that can enhance serotonin) is that it has less negative effects than drugs like antidepressants. The plant is also being investigated for the treatment of the following health problems:

  • Menopause-related symptoms, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), seasonal affective disorder (SAD), smoking cessation, viral infections are all possible causes of anxiety and depression.

An oil derived from St. John’s wort has also been used topically to promote wound healing as well as the treatment of a range of other skin disorders such as eczema and hemorrhoids.

Depression

Although research on the potential benefits of St. John’s wort is still ongoing, preliminary findings show that the herb may be more helpful than a placebo in relieving mild-to-moderate depression. According to a 2015 analysis published in the Annals of Family Medicine, antidepressants were shown to be more effective than a placebo in treating depression in individuals who were being treated by their primary care physician. 66 previously published trials (with a total of 15,161 individuals) were reviewed by the researchers, who discovered that both antidepressant medicines and St.

In addition, people who took St.

Major Depression

According to a 2018 analysis published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the most extensive research on St. John’s wort and serious depression has been conducted. During the study, researchers looked at 29 previously published clinical studies (with a total of 5,489 individuals) that compared the effects of St. John’s wort to those of a placebo or conventional antidepressant medication over a period of four to twelve weeks. The researchers discovered that St. John’s wort extracts were as effective as traditional antidepressants and may even be more beneficial than a placebo.

In their paper, the authors point out that studies done in German-speaking nations (where St.

Possible Side Effects

It is possible that those using an oral St. John’s wort supplement for a short length of time can encounter adverse effects. These may include the following:

  • Mild stomach upset, diarrhea, dry mouth, headache, fatigue, dizziness, anxiety, restlessness, tingling, and allergic skin responses are all possibilities. Erectile dysfunction or sexual dysfunction
  • Dreams that are vivid
  • Liver damage
  • Psychosis (in rare cases)

When used topically, St. John’s wort has the potential to induce a skin rash. It has also been shown that St. John’s wort (taken orally or used topically) might increase your skin and ocular sensitivity to sunshine. If you have a medical condition such as lupus or are taking medication that might cause photosensitivity (such as some acne medicines), talk to your doctor or pharmacist about the risks and benefits of taking St. John’s wort.

Possible Drug Interactions

Skin rashes have been reported when St. John’s wort is used topically. When taken orally or applied topically, St. John’s wort can also make your skin and eyes more sensitive to sunlight.

Consider discussing the risks and advantages of taking St. John’s wort with your doctor or pharmacist if you have a chronic illness such as lupus or are taking medication that might induce photosensitivity (such as some acne medicines).

  • Antibiotics, antidepressants, oral contraceptives, immunosuppressants, blood thinners such as warfarin, and other medications are all available. Anxiety-reducing sedatives and medicines are prescribed. Drugs used in the treatment of cancer, heart disease, and HIV/AIDS. Medications available over-the-counter (for sleep, coughing, and colds)

St. John’s wort might potentially interact with other herbs and vitamins, so be cautious while using it. If you are using St. John’s wort, you should avoid taking any nutritional supplement or cure that has the potential to elevate serotonin levels, such as 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), L-tryptophan, or SAMe. The use of St. John’s wort in conjunction with antidepressants or any other medication that boosts serotonin levels can result in serotonin syndrome, a potentially deadly illness caused by an excess of serotonin.

If you notice any of these symptoms, stop taking St.

The illness is potentially lethal if left untreated.

Contraindications

Some people have reported that using a supplement such as St. John’s wort is dangerous in certain settings, while others have reported that they require an adjusted amount. Taking St. John’s wort should be discussed with your doctor before beginning any new treatment if you are pregnant, nursing, attempting to conceive, or taking oral contraceptives (birth control pills). St. John’s wort may exacerbate symptoms in persons who have specific medical disorders, such as:

  • Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
  • Bipolar disorder (which may cause mania or increase the pace of cycling)
  • And other disorders Depression of extreme severity
  • The diagnosis of schizophrenia (which increases the probability of psychosis)
  • Alzheimer’s disease is a kind of dementia.

The use of some herbal supplements, such as St. John’s wort, may raise your risk of difficulties if you are put under anesthesia, according to some study. For two weeks before surgery, you should refrain from using St. John’s wort or any other herbal supplement. If you have had an organ transplant, you will need to avoid St. John’s wort since it can interfere with the drugs that are used to assist prevent transplant rejection and cause the transplant to fail.

Dosage and Preparation

There is insufficient scientific evidence to prescribe a normal dose of St. John’s wort, yet there are amounts that are routinely used by researchers who are exploring the herb’s effect on depression. In NIH-funded studies, participants were given a 300mg dosage of a specified concentration of St. John’s wort extract three times a day, with the amount increasing as the study progressed (900mg daily total). The highest daily dose was 1,800mg, which was administered twice a day. A total of 1,300mg per day was administered on an average daily basis for eight weeks over the course of the study.

  1. John’s Wort for you.
  2. St.
  3. There are dry, oil, and liquid formulations, as well as tinctures, capsules, and elixirs, available for purchase.
  4. John’s wort.
  5. In the case of depression, you may discover that taking a daily tablet of St.
  6. All preparations of the herb should be stored in a cold, dry environment to ensure that their potency is maintained.
  7. John’s wort, which is why the supplements are frequently housed in a dark-colored container.

The items containing St. John’s wort must be stored in a secure location, just like any other type of medication. Herbal supplements, unlike prescription and over-the-counter medications, are not always packaged in child-resistant containers.

What to Look For

St. John’s wort is commonly accessible in pharmacies, supermarkets, and health food stores, and it is available in a variety of dosages to suit individual needs. Check the Supplement Facts label on the product you chose to be sure you’re getting the right amount of the active ingredient(s). This label also contains information about any other components that may be present in the supplement. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommends that consumers search for items that have received a seal of approval from a third-party group that does quality testing, such as the United States Pharmacopeia, Consumer Lab, or the National Sanitation Foundation International.

A mark of approval, on the other hand, does not guarantee the safety or effectiveness of a product.

A Word From Verywell

If you or someone you love is suffering from depression, you may be looking for alternative treatment options to help you manage your symptoms more effectively. However, while the study on St. John’s wort is encouraging, it is critical that you consult with your healthcare professional and explore if it is a good treatment option for you rather than attempting it on your own. Delaying or foregoing depression therapy can have serious implications. Keep in mind to inform each health care professional with whom you engage about all of the prescriptions you are taking, including herbal or nutritional supplements, to ensure that no potentially hazardous interactions arise throughout the course of your treatment.

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