What Is Saint Johns Wort

ST. JOHN’S WORT: Overview, Uses, Side Effects, Precautions, Interactions, Dosing and Reviews

With golden, star-shaped blossoms, St. John’s wort is a plant native to Europe that is also used in herbal medicine. It is commonly used to treat depression, but it can have significant interactions with other medications. The herb St. John’s wort was given its name in honor of John the Baptist. It is customary for the plant to begin flowering around the 24th of June, which is the feast day of St. John the Baptist. The substance contains a variety of substances that operate on messengers in the brain that control mood.

John’s wort is prescribed are depression and mood disorders.

St.

In the United States, St.

  • France, on the other hand, has prohibited its usage in goods due to worries about medication interactions.
  • John’s wort may only be obtained with a doctor’s prescription.
  • It is not intended to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects, and it is not intended to cover all possible side effects and interactions.
  • As a result of whatever you have read on WebMD, you should never postpone or disregard getting professional medical advice from your doctor or another competent health care practitioner.
  • Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version has authorized permission to use this protected content.
  • Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version is a source of professional medical information on natural medicines.

St. John’s wort

The blooming shrub St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) is endemic to Europe and grows in a variety of habitats. The fact that it blooms on the birthday of the historical figure John the Baptist lends it its name to this blooming plant. St. John’s wort has active compounds such as hyperforin, which may be found in both the flowers and the leaves.

St. John’s wort is available as a dietary supplement in a variety of forms, including teas, pills, liquids, and topical formulations. St. John’s wort is used to treat depression as well as menopausal symptoms in women.

Evidence

According to research on the usage of St. John’s wort for various ailments,

  • Depression. The therapeutic effect of St. John’s wort in the treatment of mild to moderate depression has been demonstrated in a number of trials. As a matter of fact, several studies have found that the supplement is just as effective as numerous prescription antidepressants. It is still unknown if it is effective in the treatment of severe depression. Because St. John’s wort interacts with a wide range of medicines, it may not be the best choice for everyone, especially if you use any prescription medications.
  • Menopausal symptoms are a common occurrence. Taken alone or in conjunction with other herbs, such as black cohosh, some research shows that St. John’s wort may help to alleviate menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes and somatic symptom disorder. St. John’s wort appears to be effective in the treatment of this disorder, which produces significant worry over physical symptoms such as pain, weakness, or shortness of breath
  • Nevertheless, further research is needed.

Our take

St. John’s wort has shown to be useful in the treatment of mild to moderate depression in certain people. However, the supplement has been shown to interact with a wide range of drugs and to produce significant negative effects in some cases. You should see your doctor before taking St. John’s wort if you are taking any other drugs at the same time.

Safety and side effects

St. John’s wort is usually believed to be safe when taken orally for up to 12 weeks at suitable quantities. However, it has the potential to cause:

  • A feeling of agitation and anxiety, dizziness, diarrhea, constipation, and stomach discomfort, as well as dry mouth

Other possible adverse effects include:

  • Frustration, sleep deprivation, and headache
  • Increased sensitivity to sunlight (photosensitivity)

When it comes to the safety of using St. John’s wort topically, there isn’t enough information available. Use of St. John’s wort is not recommended during pregnancy or while nursing.

Interactions

Some well-known interactions are included in the following list. Other medications, on the other hand, may have an adverse reaction to St. John’s wort. It is recommended that you consult your doctor before using St. John’s wort in conjunction with any other medicine, especially prescription pharmaceuticals.

  • Alprazolam is a sedative (Xanax). Taking St. John’s wort with this medication, which is intended to alleviate anxiety symptoms, may reduce the effectiveness of the medication
  • Antidepressants. Taking St. John’s wort in conjunction with antidepressants may raise the likelihood of your body building up dangerously high amounts of serotonin. A high level of serotonin might result in mild to severe adverse effects. Taking this supplement while also taking an antidepressant requires the supervision of a doctor. Barbiturates. Taking St. John’s wort in conjunction with a medication that works as a central nervous system depressant (barbiturate) may result in a reduction in barbiturate-induced sleep time
  • Bupropion may also have this effect (Wellbutrin SR, Forfivo XL). Taking St. John’s wort at the same time as this antidepressant may reduce the drug’s effectiveness. Certain chemotherapeutic medicines are available. Taking St. John’s wort in conjunction with chemotherapy treatments such as irinotecan (Camptosar, Onivyde), docetaxel (Taxotere), or imatinib (Gleevec) may help to minimize the effects of the chemotherapy agent
  • Some immunosuppressive drugs. Taking St. John’s wort with tacrolimus (Prograf, Astagraf XL, and other similar drugs) or cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune, and other similar drugs) may reduce the effectiveness of the medication
  • Some statins. It is possible that taking St. John’s wort with simvastatin (Zocor, Flolipid) will diminish the efficacy of the medicine. Contraceptive medicines are prescribed. It is possible that the use of St. John’s wort in conjunction with contraceptive medications will result in breakthrough bleeding, irregular bleeding, or an unintended pregnancy. It is possible that an extra or alternative method of birth control will be required
  • Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2), cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6), cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19), cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9), and cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) substrates are also possible. If you are taking a medication that is affected by these enzymes, such as Dextromethorphan, avoid taking St. John’s wort. Taking St. John’s wort together with this cough suppressant may raise your chance of developing excessive levels of serotonin in your body
  • Digoxin may also enhance this risk (Lanoxin). Taking St. John’s wort at the same time as this cardiac medicine may lessen the effects of the prescription
  • Fexofenadine (Allegra Allergy). Taking St. John’s wort together with this antihistamine may induce an excessive buildup of the medication in your body, which may exacerbate the normal adverse effects
  • Ketamine (Ketalar). It is possible that taking St. John’s wort with ketamine would lessen the anesthetic effect of the medication
  • Narcotics. If you are using methadone, avoid taking St. John’s wort (Methadose). When St. John’s wort is used with some drugs, the efficacy of the medicine may be reduced. It is possible that taking the supplement in conjunction with narcotics would boost the amount of time spent sleeping and the effectiveness of the painkilling effects of the drugs. Taking St. John’s wort with one of these anti-HIV medications may diminish the effectiveness of the treatment
  • Omeprazole is one such drug (Prilosec). It is not recommended to use St. John’s wort with this medication used to treat recurrent heartburn. Phenytoin’s efficacy may be reduced as a result of the supplement (Dilantin, Phenytek). When St. John’s wort is used in conjunction with this anticonvulsant, it may result in a loss of seizure control. Drugs that cause photosensitization. Taking St. John’s wort in conjunction with a medication that enhances sensitivity to sunlight may increase the likelihood of having a response
  • Protease inhibitors. The use of St. John’s wort in conjunction with this type of antiviral medication can diminish the efficacy of the medication
  • Triptans. Take St. John’s wort with caution if you are using any of these migraine drugs. The supplement may raise the likelihood of your body building up dangerously high amounts of serotonin in the long run. Voriconazole might produce mild to severe adverse effects if there is too much serotonin in the body. Taking St. John’s wort together with this antifungal medication may diminish the effectiveness of the medication
  • Warfarin may reduce the effectiveness of this antifungal medication (Jantoven). Taking St. John’s wort at the same time as this blood clotting medication may diminish the effectiveness of the medication.

13th of February, 2021

  1. St. John’s wort is a herbal remedy. Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health). Accessed on January 17, 2021
  2. St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum). Natural Medicines. Accessed on January 17, 2021
  3. St. John’s wort. FactsComparisons eAnswers (accessed on January 17, 2021). On the 17th of January, 2021, I was able to access St. John’s wort through IBM Microdemex. Kellerman RD, et al., accessed on January 17, 2021
  4. Kellerman RD, et al. Herbs and nutritional supplements that are widely used. Conn’s Current Therapy 2021 is a reference book about current therapy. The year is 2021, and Elsevier is the publisher. On the 17th of January, 2021, it was accessible.

It is not the policy of Mayo Clinic to promote companies or goods. We rely on advertising money to sustain our non-profit work. AdvertisingSponsorship

St. John’s Wort

  • There has been no evidence of harm from taking St. John’s wort by mouth for as long as 12 weeks, according to research studies. St. John’s wort, on the other hand, interacts with a wide range of medications, making it potentially unsafe for many people, particularly those who take conventional medications
  • St. John’s wort can weaken the effects of a wide range of medications, including critically important medications such as
  • Taking St. John’s wort by mouth for up to 12 weeks has been shown to be safe in research investigations so far. St. John’s wort, on the other hand, interacts with a wide range of medications, making it potentially unsafe for many individuals, particularly those who use conventional medicines
  • St. John’s wort can impair the effectiveness of a wide range of medications, including critically vital medications such as
  • Taking St. John’s wort in conjunction with some antidepressants or other medications that influence serotonin, a neurotransmitter generated by nerve cells, may result in an increase in serotonin-related adverse effects, some of which may be potentially life-threatening. It is possible that St. John’s wort, especially when taken in excessive dosages, can produce greater sensitivity to sunlight. Other adverse effects may include insomnia, anxiety, dry mouth, dizziness, gastrointestinal issues, exhaustion, headache, or sexual dysfunction
  • However, these are not all possible. When it comes to using St. John’s wort topically, there isn’t enough credible information available to determine if it is safe. It has the potential to produce serious skin responses when exposed to the sun
  • It is not known whether or not it is safe to take St. John’s wort during pregnancy or during nursing. In experimental animals, it has been shown to induce birth abnormalities. Lactating moms who use St. John’s wort may experience colic, sleepiness, and fussiness in their newborns.

St. John’s Wort and Depression: In Depth

  • It has been known for generations that St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum), a plant that grows in the wild, may be used to treat mental health disorders. Throughout Europe, St. John’s wort is commonly recommended for depression
  • In the United States, St. John’s Wort is sold as a dietary supplement because the criteria for selling supplements are less stringent than the rules for selling prescription or over-the-counter pharmaceuticals.

More information on St. John’s wort may be found on the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) Web page dedicated to the herb.

AboutDepression

Depression (sometimes known as major depressive disorder or clinical depression) is a common yet devastating mood illness that affects millions of people every year. It produces severe symptoms that interfere with your ability to sleep, eat, and do daily tasks like as working or going to the bathroom. In 2015, over 7% of individuals in the United States reported having experienced at least one episode of serious depression in the previous year. Depression manifests itself in a variety of ways, including the following:

  • Feeling depressed or nervous on a regular or constant basis
  • Not wishing to participate in things that used to be enjoyable
  • Having a bad mood, being easily annoyed, or being restless
  • I’m having trouble sleeping and I’m feeling exhausted. having a larger or smaller appetite than normal, or having no appetite
  • Experiencing pain that does not improve despite medical intervention
  • Affective difficulties such as difficulty concentrating, remembering details, or making decisions
  • Having a sense of remorse, worthlessness, or helplessness
  • Thinking of committing suicide or harming oneself

In order to treat depression, antidepressants and various forms of psychotherapy are used. More information about depression may be found on the Depression page of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) website.

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What the Science Says About the Effectiveness of St.John’s Wort forDepression

The findings of trials on the efficacy of St. John’s wort in the treatment of depression have been inconsistent.

  • In a 12-week scientific research with 73 individuals conducted in 2011, neither St. John’s wort nor citalopram, a typical antidepressant medicine known as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), significantly reduced symptoms of mild depression compared to a placebo treatment. The study was supported by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health and the National Institute of Mental Health. When tested in a 26-week clinical experiment with 124 people, St. John’s Wort was shown to be as effective as a typical antidepressant (sertraline, an SSRI), a placebo, and no treatment at all for major depression of moderate severity. The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health and the National Institute of Mental Health supported this 2012 examination of data obtained in 2002. St. John’s wort, according to a 2008 assessment of 29 worldwide research, may be more effective than a placebo and as effective as other mainstream prescription antidepressants for severe depression of mild to moderate intensity, compared to other antidepressants. It also indicated that St. John’s wort was associated with less negative effects than conventional antidepressants. The studies conducted in German-speaking countries, where St. John’s wort has a long history of use by medical professionals, reported more positive results than those conducted in other countries, including the United States
  • However, a 2002 study funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Mental Health found that St. John’s wort was no more effective than a placebo in treating major depression of moderate severity.

St. John’s Wort: The Benefits and the Dangers

There has been some evidence that St. John’s wort can be used to treat depression and other medical issues, but doctors caution that there are potential risks associated with using this herbal supplement. St. John’s wort is a completely natural herb. A herbal supplement that does not require a prescription and that can be purchased at a health food shop, this is what you are looking for. While it may sound innocuous, according to a research published in 2015 in the journal Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, this does not always imply that the substance is safe.

  1. John’s wort against those of the antidepressant medication fluoxetine to see which was more harmful (Prozac).
  2. Between 2000 and 2013, a total of 84 complaints of adverse reactions to St.
  3. There were 447 reports of Prozac being misused.
  4. The side effects of the two drugs are very similar to one another.
  5. There are also substantial issues regarding medication interactions, which are causing worry.
  6. John’s wort, is a flowering plant.
  7. The widely utilized herbal treatment is frequently used to alleviate the symptoms of depression.

John’s wort has been used medicinally for hundreds of years.

John’s wort can be beneficial in the treatment of serious depression.

John’s wort significantly decreased symptoms of mild to moderate depression more than a placebo and in a manner comparable to prescription antidepressants.

John’s wort demonstrated benefits on mild to moderate depression that were comparable to those of antidepressant medications.

John’s wort to antidepressants, the researchers discovered that fewer patients discontinued taking the herb.

John’s wort was shown to be useful in the treatment of wounds, bruises, burns, and sores, according to another study.

The FDA, on the other hand, considers St.

As a result, the government does not conduct safety and efficacy tests on it.

Jeremy Wolf, who is also an accredited licensed naturopathic physician (CNM).

He points out that St.

St.

He expressed concern that the plant is not a quick-acting remedy.

How much St.

According to Blair Green Thielemier, PharmD, who spoke with Healthline in 2015, dosage varies as a result of non-standard manufacturing.

It is normally given in two or three split doses (300 mg three times daily or 600 mg twice daily).

John’s wort on the human body are still being researched.

These active substances include hypericin, hyperforin, and adhyperforin, among others.

These then have the effect of lifting and regulating your mood.

Unless a company is developing a novel dietary component, it is not required to furnish FDA authorities with the data that it uses to justify the safety or effectiveness of its products before or after they are introduced to the market.

The plant is associated with a biochemical process known as cytochrome 450, which is the source of most of the controversy.

‘These enzymes are responsible for the breakdown of anything from a glass of wine you could have with dinner to a daily vitamin you might take to keep your bones healthy,’ Thielemier explained.

According to Thielemier, if you have ever heard that grapefruit juice might cause your drugs to become ineffective, you are familiar with the process known as enzyme induction.

John’s wort encourages the body to manufacture more of these enzymes in order to flush the chemical out of the bloodstream.

Wolf speculates that the plant may have a comparable effect as fluoxetine.

It also has interactions with a wide range of commonly used medications.

“Confusion, fever, anxiety, high heart rate, shaking, sweating, diarrhea, and muscular spasms are all symptoms of this condition.” As reported by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, St.

Anti-rejection medicines, cardiac medications, and several treatments used to treat heart disease, HIV, and cancer are all known to interact with this medication.

Wolf cautioned that women who are pregnant or nursing should avoid using St.

People who are sensitive to sunlight should also avoid using the plant since it might increase the intensity of the impact.

John’s wort.

Thielemier believes this to be true.

“The challenge is the exorbitant expenditures associated with demonstrating safety and efficacy through clinical studies,” she explained.

Correction: This item was first published on August 6, 2015, but has been amended on June 6, 2018 to reflect recent developments.

St. John’s Wort: Benefits, Side Effects & More

Research suggests that St. John’s wort can be used to treat depression and other medical issues, but doctors caution that there are potential risks associated with using this herbal remedy. It is natural to use St. John’s Wort. A herbal supplement that does not require a prescription and that can be purchased at a health food shop is available. According to a research published in the journal Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology in 2015, just because something sounds wonderful doesn’t mean it’s harmless.

  1. John’s wort against those of the antidepressant medication fluoxetine to see which was worse (Prozac).
  2. A total of 84 complaints of adverse reactions to St.
  3. Prozac was the subject of 447 reports.
  4. Neither chemical has distinct side effects, yet they are comparable in nature.
  5. The possibility of medication interactions also raises severe concerns.
  6. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum).
  7. Depression symptoms are frequently alleviated by the use of popular herbal treatment.

John’s wort has been in use for hundreds of years.

John’s wort has been shown to be useful in the treatment of serious depression, according to a Cochrane study.

John’s wort significantly decreased symptoms of mild to moderate depression more than a placebo and in a manner similar to prescription antidepressant medication.

John’s wort demonstrated effects on mild to moderate depression that were comparable to those of antidepressant drugs.

John’s wort to antidepressants, the researchers found that fewer patients discontinued using the herb.

John’s wort was shown to be useful in the treatment of wounds, bruises, burns, and sores according to another study.

Indeed, the FDA categorizes St.

As a result, the government does not conduct safety and efficacy testing on it.

Jeremy Wolf, who is also an accredited licensed naturopathic physician (ARNP).

John’s wort, according to him.

Wolfgang Wolf.

Prior to noticing any result, it might take several weeks or months.

John’s wort?

Anywhere between 300 and 1200 mg per day would be considered typical.

Exactly what the body does when it comes to St.

Some of the active compounds in the supplement, including hypericin, hyperforin, and adhyperforin, may be responsible for the supplement’s therapeutic advantages.

Your mood is lifted and stabilized when you consume them.

Firms are not required to furnish FDA authorities with the evidence they rely on to justify the safety or effectiveness of their goods before or after they advertise them unless the business is developing a novel dietary component.

The herb’s effects on the cytochrome 450 metabolic pathway are the focus of the majority of the public’s attention.

‘These enzymes are in charge of breaking down anything from a glass of wine you would have with dinner to a daily vitamin you could take to keep your bones strong,’ Thielemier explained.

According to Thielemier, if you have ever heard that grapefruit juice might cause drugs to become ineffective, you are already familiar with the process known as enzyme induction.

John’s wort encourages the body to manufacture more of these enzymes in order to flush the chemical out of the bloodstream.

Wolf hypothesizes that the plant works in a similar way to the medication fluoxetine According to this hypothesis, it interferes with the reuptake of serotonin and causes the same side effects.

If used in conjunction with SSRIs and MAOinhibitors, it has the potential to cause high blood pressure and the development of what is known as serotonin syndrome.

John’s wort interacts with oral contraceptives, anti-seizure drugs, and anticoagulants in addition to antidepressants.

In one research conducted in 2011, it was shown that the herbal supplement can diminish the efficacy of the anxiety drug Xanax.

John’s wort is not recommended for use by pregnant or nursing women, according to Wolf.

People on prescription drugs should avoid using St.

Should natural and herbal goods be labeled with warnings and subjected to the same rigorous testing as pharmaceuticals?

“The difficulty is the exorbitant expenditures associated with demonstrating safety and efficacy in clinical studies,” she explained.

How do I take St. John’s wort?

Prepared in the United States include varying levels of active substance, so be sure to check the label to see how much you’re getting in your tablets. St. John’s wort can be consumed in a variety of ways, depending on how it is prepared. Examples include:

  • 300 mg three times a day for up to six weeks
  • 250 mg twice a day for up to six weeks
  • 300 to 600 mg three times a day for up to six weeks
  • 350 mg three times a day for eight weeks
  • 300 to 600 mg three times a day for up to 26 weeks
  • 400 mg twice a day for up to six weeks

What are the potential benefits of using St. John’s wort?

  • Depression symptoms are less noticeable
  • Menopausal symptoms are less noticeable. It can aid in wound healing when administered topically to the skin as a lotion.

What should I watch out for if I use St. John’s wort?

  • Increased sensitivity to the sun, particularly if you are fair-skinned and taking high dosages of the medication
  • Hypertension (high blood pressure)

It is not recommended to use St. John’s wort during pregnancy or when nursing a child. St. John’s wort has been linked to extremely significant and even deadly interactions with a wide range of commonly prescribed medications. St. John’s wort has the potential to impair the effectiveness of other medications, including antidepressants, birth control pills, cyclosporine (an anti-rejection drug), digoxin (a heart medication), HIV treatments, cancer therapies, and blood thinners such as Coumadin, among others.

  • John’s wort in conjunction with antidepressant medications.
  • It is important to inform your doctor or pharmacist if you are using St.
  • St.
  • Get useful, helpful, and relevant health and wellness information and news sent to your inbox.

More health news + info

It has long been believed that St. John’s wort has therapeutic properties, particularly in the treatment of depression, although this has not been proven. Aside from that, it looks to possess antibacterial qualities and may even have antiviral characteristics. St. John’s wort, also known as Perforate St. John’s wort, Tipton’s Weed, or Klamath weed, is a herb that originates from a flowering plant calledHypericum perforatum (also known as Perforate St. John’s wort). It is available in a variety of forms, including teas, pills, capsules, and a topical therapy.

  1. Other components, such as hyperforin and flavonoids, may also have an impact on the outcome.
  2. John’s wort has been shown to interact adversely with several prescription medications, therefore caution should be exercised when using it, and any usage should be addressed with a health care practitioner beforehand.
  3. Pin it to your Pinterest board.
  4. John’s wort is a plant that has antidepressant and perhaps antiviral properties, among other things.
  5. John the Baptist, whose feast day (the 24th of June) coincides when the plant is in full bloom, hence earning the moniker “St.
  6. John the Baptist, which is historically celebrated on the plant’s leaves.
  7. John’s beheading.

John during the Crusades to cure the injured.

St.

In medieval times, it was employed for the purpose of “pushing out the inner demon.” The plant was prescribed by Paracelsus, a 16th-century philosopher, for treating hallucinations and “dragons,” as well as for mending wounds.

John’s wort were first documented in scientific literature in 1959 and 1971, respectively.

Nowadays, St.

In the last 20 years, the medicinal use of cannabis has increased in other parts of the world.

According to the findings of a 2016 evaluation of research, St.

Researchers noted, however, that the data was hampered by a paucity of study into the use of the medication for severe depression and a failure to disclose adverse events to the FDA.

St.

The herb is most commonly used in tablet or capsule form, although it is also available in teabags and other forms.

St.

The herb appears to be as effective as tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) in the treatment of mild-to-moderate major depression in short-term trials lasting up to 12 weeks.

John’s wort studies that compare it to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as Prozac (fluoxetine) or Zoloft (sertraline), are few and far between, but there is some evidence that the herb may be as effective as these drugs while having fewer side effects, according to some evidence.

  1. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a condition in which a person has difficulty paying attention.
  2. John’s wort could be “somewhat beneficial” in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), however other studies revealed that it was ineffective.
  3. Anxiety disorder: There is insufficient data to conclude that St.
  4. Atopic dermatitis: According to the findings of a study on the efficacy of hypericum cream, mild to moderate atopic dermatitis may react well to topical therapy.
  5. St.
  6. HIV: Although some animal research have shown that St.

In order to avoid the possibility of medication interactions, the use of St. John’s wort for HIV or AIDS is not suggested. St. John’s wort has also been studied for its potential benefits in the following areas:

  • It has long been believed that St. John’s wort has therapeutic properties, particularly in the treatment of depression, although this has not been confirmed. Aside from that, it appears to possess antibacterial and maybe antiviral activities. St. John’s wort, also known as Perforate St. John’s wort, Tipton’s Weed, or Klamath weed, is a flowering plant that grows in the Hypericum perforatum family. This herbal remedy is available in a variety of forms including teas, pills, capsules, and topical applications. The active component hypericin is found in the plant, and it is possible that this is what provides the herb with the majority of its medicinal properties. Various other components, such as hyperforin and flavonoids, may also have an impact. Due to the potential risk of St. John’s wort when combined with some prescription medications, extreme caution should be exercised when using it, and any usage should be addressed with a health-care practitioner before beginning. As well as increased photosensitivity, or sun sensitivity, stomach discomfort and allergic responses might occur as a result of this medication. Pin it to your Pinterest boards. It is believed that St John’s Wort has antidepressant and maybe antiviral properties, however this is not confirmed. It is named after St. John the Baptist, whose feast day is celebrated on June 24, the same day that the plant is in full bloom. On August 29th in the northern hemisphere, red stains are believed to develop on the plant’s leaves, commemorating the date of the death of St. John the Baptist, which is historically observed on the plant’s leaves. Blood was allegedly spilled at St. John’s beheading, and the red dots are claimed to reflect this. According to legend, the Knights of St. John used the plant to cure the injured during the Crusades. It’s not understood exactly how it works, but the effect it has on the brain may be comparable to that of an antidepressant such as fluoxetine or Prozac, in that it increases the availability of certain neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine (the happy hormone). Historically, St. John’s wort has been used in folk medicine to treat a variety of ailments, most notably wounds and cuts. When it was first introduced, it was supposed to “drive out the inner demon.” An ancient philosopher, Paracelsus, advocated the plant for treating hallucinations and “dragons,” as well as for mending cuts and wounds in the 16th century. The antibacterial activities of St. John’s wort were first documented in 1959 and again in 1971. Hyperforin, an antibacterial compound found in the plant, was isolated and tested. Modern-day usage of St. John’s wort, particularly in Germany, as a herbal cure for depression has become widespread throughout Europe. In the last 20 years, its therapeutic application has expanded around the world. There is no FDA approval for it as an over-the-counter (OTC) or prescription medicine to treat depression in the United States (U.S.), according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). St. John’s Wort is superior to aplacebo in the treatment of mild to severe depression, according to a study published in 2016. Researchers noted, however, that the data was weak due to a lack of study on the use of the treatment for severe depression and a lack of reporting of adverse events in the clinical trial. Not all of the research, on the other hand, was consistently trustworthy. St. John’s wort is accessible over-the-counter in the majority of nations, however in other countries, such as Ireland, a prescription is necessary. The herb is most commonly used in tablet or capsule form, although it is also available as teabags and capsules. Tinctures, which are medicinal extracts in an alcohol solution, are used topically for topical treatment. There have been a variety of studies conducted on St. John’s wort, with various conclusions. Depressive disorder: Short-term trials, lasting up to 12 weeks, have shown that the herb is more effective than a placebo and as effective as tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) in the treatment of mild-to-moderate major depression. St. John’s wort studies that compare it to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as Prozac (fluoxetine) or Zoloft (sertraline), are few and few between, but there is some indication that the herb may be as beneficial as these treatments while having fewer adverse effects, if not none at all. Evidence to support its usage in children does not exist at this time. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a condition in which a person has excessive amounts of energy but little concentration. One tiny research showed that St. John’s wort could be “somewhat beneficial” in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), however other studies concluded that it was ineffective. The possibility that it will aggravate symptoms has been raised in some circles. In the case of anxiety disorder, there is insufficient evidence to conclude that St. John’s wort is beneficial, and it may even exacerbate symptoms. Atopic dermatitis: According to the findings of a study on the efficacy of hypericum cream, mild to moderate atopic dermatitis may react well to topical therapy of this condition. People who suffer from somatoform diseases have physical symptoms that are not caused by an organic condition. It is possible that St. John’s wort can be used to treat some of these conditions, but further research is required. Although some animal research have shown that St. John’s wort may have antiviral properties, one human experiment has found that this is not the case. Because of the possibility of medication interactions, the use of St. John’s wort for HIV or AIDS is not advised. St. John’s wort has also been studied for its potential use in the following areas:
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In order to validate its efficacy, further proof is required. As a rule of thumb, 300 milligrams (mg) three times a day with meals is the recommended dose in capsule or dry tablet form. This is intended for adults. It is not suggested for youngsters under the age of 18. If there are any adverse effects, they may include the following:

  • For it to be shown successful, further proof is required. Taking 300 milligrams (mg) three times a day with meals is the normal dose in capsule or dry tablet form. You must be over the age of majority to participate. For youngsters, it is not advised. The following may occur if adverse effects arise:

For it to be effective, more evidence must be gathered. The normal dose in capsule or dry tablet form is 300 milligrams (mg) three times a day with meals, taken with meals on an empty stomach. This is for people over the age of majority. It is not suggested for youngsters under the age of eight. If any adverse effects do occur, they may include the following:

  • Anticonvulsants, cyclosporine, digoxin, oral contraceptives, several anti-HIV medications, theophylline, warfarin, and other medications

St. John’s wort may enhance the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants. This can result in a potentially dangerous spike in serotonin levels in the body. Among the signs and symptoms are:

  • Tremors, diarrhea, disorientation, muscular rigidity, and a low body temperature are all possible symptoms.

It has the potential to be deadly. St. John’s wort has been shown to cause psychosis in certain individuals. People suffering from bipolar illness or serious depression should avoid using it since it may cause a mania. It can also enhance the effects of triptan medications, such as sumatriptan, that are used to treat migraines. It is not yet known whether or not St. John’s wort is safe to consume during pregnancy or when nursing a newborn. When considering using St. John’s wort or any other supplements or alternative therapies, patients should always consult with their doctor first, especially if they are currently on drugs.

According to a study released in 2015, because St John’s wort has a profile that is similar to that of fluoxetine, it can also cause the same adverse responses as the drug.

St. John’s wort Uses, Side Effects & Warnings

St. John’s wort (SAINT JOHN’S WORT) is the generic name for this plant. Brand name (short for trademark): Oral capsule (-); oral tablet (-) are the available dosage forms (-) Herbal medications and antidepressants of various types are included in this drug class.

  • Indications, precautions, and instructions
  • What to avoid
  • Side effects and interactions

What is St. John’s wort?

St. John’s wort is a plant that is also known by the names Amber, Barbe de Saint-Jean, Chasse-diable, Demon Chaser, Fuga Daemonum, Goatweed, Hardhay, and other variations of these names. Shea Butter, Herbe à la Brûlure, Herbe à Mille Trous, Herbe à Mille Vertus, Herbe à Piqûres, Herbe de Saint Éloi, Herbe de la Saint-Jean, Herbe du Charpentier, Herbe Percée, Hierba de San Juan, Hypereikon, Hyperici Herba, Hypericum perforatum, Klamath Weed, Millepertuis St. John’s wort has long been recognized in alternative medicine as a potentially helpful treatment for mild to severe depression, as well as its associated symptoms such as anxiety and sleeplessness.

  • John’s wort as a potentially helpful treatment for somatization disorder (physical disease or symptoms that have no known cause) and hot flashes associated with menopause.
  • John’s wort has shown promise in the treatment of skin sores and irritation caused by psoriasis, according to several studies and reports.
  • John’s wort has been shown to be effective in clinical trials.
  • John’s wort is not useful in the treatment of certain illnesses, according to their findings.
  • It is not known whether or if St.
  • The Food and Drug Administration has not authorized the use of this product for medical purposes.
  • John’s wort should not be taken in place of the prescription provided to you.
  • John’s wort is a plant that is frequently offered as a dietary supplement.

The purchase of herbal/health supplements should be made from a reputable supplier in order to reduce the danger of contamination. St. John’s wort can be used for a variety of other applications that are not covered in this product guide.

Warnings

A variety of names for St. John’s wort include Amber, Barbe de Saint-Jean, Chasse-diable, Demon Chaser (also known as Fuga Daemonum), Goatweed, Hardhay, and others. Shea Butter, Herbe à la Brûlure, Herbe à Mille Trous, Herbe à Mille Vertus, Herbe à Piqûres, Herbe de Saint Éloi, Herbe de la Saint-Jean, Herbe du Charpentier, Herbe Percée, Hierba de San Juan, Hypereikon, Hyperici Herba, Hypericum perforatum, Klamath Weed, Saynt Johannes Wort, Traditionally, alternative medicine practitioners have utilized St.

  • Alternative medicine practitioners have utilized St.
  • Topically applied St.
  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), social anxiety, hepatitis C, irritable bowel syndrome, diabetic nerve pain, and burning mouth syndrome are among conditions for which St.
  • Researchers have discovered that St.

Some other uses that have not been proven through research include anxiety disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder(OCD), premenstrual syndrome(PMS), seasonal affective disorder(SAD), genital herpes or cold sores, sciatic nerve pain, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, migraine headaches, weight loss, and smoking cessation.

  • John’s wort is useful in treating any medical issue, this is not known for definite.
  • When recommended by your doctor, St.
  • Herbal supplements containing the plant St.
  • The manufacture of many herbal substances is not subject to any regulatory oversight; in fact, several advertised supplements have been shown to be tainted with harmful metals or other medications.
  • This product guide does not cover all of the possible applications of St.

Before taking this medicine

St. John’s wort is a plant that is also known by the names Amber, Barbe de Saint-Jean, Chasse-diable, Demon Chaser, Fuga Daemonum, Goatweed, Hardhay, and other variations of those names. Herbe à la Brûlure, Herbe à Mille Trous, Herbe Aux Fées, Herbe Aux Mille Vertus, Herbe Aux Piqûres, Herbe de Saint Éloi, Herbe de la Saint-Jean, Herbe du Charpentier, Herbe Percée, Hierba de San Juan, Hypereikon, Hyperici Herb, Hypericum perforatum, Klamath Weed, Millepert St. John’s wort has long been recognized in alternative medicine as a potentially helpful treatment for mild to severe depression, as well as associated symptoms such as anxiety and sleeplessness.

  1. John’s wort as a potentially helpful treatment for somatization disorder (physical disease or symptoms that have no recognized cause) and hot flashes associated by menopause.
  2. John’s wort has shown promise in the treatment of skin sores and irritation caused by psoriasis.
  3. John’s wort.
  4. John’s wort is not beneficial in the treatment of several illnesses.
  5. It is not known whether or if St.
  6. The FDA has not authorized the use of this product for medicinal purposes.
  7. John’s wort should not be taken in place of the prescription prescribed for you.
  8. John’s wort is a plant that is frequently offered as a supplement.

For the lowest possible danger of contamination, herbal/health supplements should be acquired from a reputable provider. St. John’s wort can be used for a variety of other applications that are not included in this product reference.

  • Medicines to treat depression, anxiety, or allergies
  • Asthma or allergy medicine
  • Cough or cold medicine
  • Cancer medicine (chemotherapy)
  • Cholesterol medication
  • Erectile dysfunction medications
  • Heart or blood pressure medications
  • HIV or AIDS medications
  • Medicine to prevent organ transplant rejection
  • Medicine to treat any type of infection (including HIV, fungal infections, malaria, or tuberculosis)
  • Medicine to treat psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other autoimmune diseases

If you have any of the following conditions, consult with your doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare practitioner to determine if it is safe for you to take this product:

  • For those who have any of the following medical conditions, consult with your doctor or pharmacist to see if using this product may be dangerous for you.

St. John’s wort has the potential to damage an unborn child. If you are pregnant, you should not take this product without consulting a doctor. St. John’s wort has been shown to reduce the effectiveness of birth control tablets. Inquire with your doctor about the possibility of using non-hormonal birth control (condom, diaphragm with spermicide) to avoid pregnancy. The herb St. John’s wort may have an effect on fertility (your ability to have children). If you are attempting to conceive, you should avoid using this product altogether.

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John’s wort has the potential to enter into breast milk and induce adverse consequences in a breastfeeding infant.

It is not recommended to offer St.

When used for up to 8 weeks, St.

How should I take St. John’s wort?

If you are pregnant, avoid using St. John’s wort. This product should not be used during pregnancy without consulting a doctor. When used with birth control pills, St. John’s wort can reduce their effectiveness significantly. To avoid pregnancy, consult with your doctor about non-hormonal birth control (condom, diaphragm, and/or spermicide). Saint John’s wort is thought to have an effect on reproduction (your ability to have children). If you are attempting to conceive, you should avoid using this product.

John’s wort passing into breast milk, it may have unintended consequences for a breastfeeding infant.

An individual less than 6 years of age should not be administered St.

When used for up to 8 weeks, St.

What happens if I miss a dose?

If it is almost time for your next scheduled dosage, you should skip the missed dose. It is not necessary to take more St. John’s wort to make up for a missed dosage.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek immediate medical treatment or dial 1-800-222-1222 to reach the Poison Help hotline for assistance.

What should I avoid while taking St. John’s wort?

It is not recommended to use St. John’s wort with other herbal or health products without seeing a doctor first. Avoid direct sunlight or tanning beds if at all possible. St. John’s wort has the potential to make you more susceptible to sunburn. When you’re out in the sun, make sure to dress in protective clothes and wear sunscreen (SPF 30 or above). St. John’s wort should not be taken in conjunction with other medications that might make you more sensitive to sunlight, such as antibiotic medications or sulfa drugs.

St. John’s wort side effects

If you develop any of the following symptoms of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or neck, get emergency medical attention. Although not all negative effects have been identified, St. John’s wort is considered to be safe when taken by an adult for up to 12 weeks or by a kid aged 6-17 for up to 8 weeks, according to the National Institutes of Health.

When eaten in big quantities, St. John’s wort may be hazardous to one’s health. If you develop any of the following symptoms, stop using St. John’s wort and contact your healthcare professional right away:

  • Extreme skin irritation, rash, or sensitivity
  • Severe sunburn (redness, burning, blistering) after spending time outside
  • Or (if you are also taking an antidepressant or narcotic pain medicine) Affective symptoms include: agitation
  • Hallucinations
  • Fever
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Hyperactive reflexes
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Lack of coordination
  • And fainting

Extreme skin irritation, rash, or sensitivity; acute sunburn (redness, burning, blistering) after being outside; or (if you are also taking an antidepressant or narcotic pain medicine) Affective symptoms include: agitation; hallucinations; fever; rapid heart rate; hyperactive reflexes; nausea; vomiting; diarrhea; lack of coordination; fainting

  • The following symptoms: sleep problems (insomnia), weird dreams
  • A sensation of anxiety, irritation, or restlessness
  • Dry mouth, upset stomach, diarrhea
  • Skin reaction (rashes)
  • Headache, dizziness
  • Or fatigue.

The following is not a comprehensive list of possible side effects, and more may occur. For medical advice concerning side effects, consult with your doctor. You can report adverse effects to the Food and Drug Administration at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect St. John’s wort?

Many medicines have the potential to interact with St. John’s wort, and certain pharmaceuticals should not be used in conjunction with this herb. In this category are medications, vitamins, and herbal supplements (both prescription and over-the-counter). This drug guide does not include a comprehensive list of all probable interactions. Inform your doctor of all medications you are taking, as well as any medications you begin or stop taking while receiving therapy with St. John’s wort. Provide a list of all of your medications to every healthcare practitioner who serves you, including your primary care physician.

Further information

  • If you are considering utilizing any herbal or health supplement, consult with a registered healthcare expert first. In order to ensure that all of your healthcare providers are aware of all of your medical issues and medications, whether you are being treated by a medical doctor or a practitioner educated in the use of natural medicines/supplements, you should:

Remember to keep this and all other medications out of the reach of children, never share your medications with others, and only use this drug for the indication that has been given for it. Always check with your healthcare practitioner to confirm that the information contained on this page is accurate and applicable to your specific situation. Disclaimer on Medical ImplicationsCopyright 1996-2022 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 5.01 (Cerner Multum, Inc.

What Is St. John’s Wort Used For and Can It Benefit You?

Known for its vivid yellow blossoms, St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) is a flowering plant belonging to the Hypericaceae family. It is reported to bloom for the first time around the time of St. John the Baptist’s birthday, thus it is also known as St. John’s wort. In Old English, the term “wort” literally translates as “plant.”

Commonly Known As

  • The botanical names for St. John’s wort are Hypericum (from the scientific name), Goatweed, Klamath weed, and Tipton weed, respectively.

St. John’s wort has been used medicinally for hundreds of years. Today, the widely utilized herb is frequently employed in the treatment of depression-related symptoms. Jessica Olah’s song “Verywell”

Health Benefits

Saint John’s wort is commonly considered to improve mood and give some relief from depression, although the specific mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood. Researchers believe that the herb’s active compounds (hypericin and hyperforin) may have the potential to enhance levels of certain brain neurotransmitters, such as serotonin. People suffering from depression frequently have low amounts of serotonin and other neurotransmitters in their bodies. One reason why individuals may choose to try St.

The plant is also being investigated for the treatment of the following health problems:

  • Menopause-related symptoms, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), seasonal affective disorder (SAD), smoking cessation, viral infections are all possible causes of anxiety and depression.

An oil derived from St.

John’s wort has also been used topically to promote wound healing as well as the treatment of a range of other skin disorders such as eczema and hemorrhoids.

Depression

Although research on the potential benefits of St. John’s wort is still ongoing, preliminary findings show that the herb may be more helpful than a placebo in relieving mild-to-moderate depression. According to a 2015 analysis published in the Annals of Family Medicine, antidepressants were shown to be more effective than a placebo in treating depression in individuals who were being treated by their primary care physician. 66 previously published trials (with a total of 15,161 individuals) were reviewed by the researchers, who discovered that both antidepressant medicines and St.

In addition, people who took St.

Major Depression

According to a 2018 analysis published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the most extensive research on St. John’s wort and serious depression has been conducted. During the study, researchers looked at 29 previously published clinical studies (with a total of 5,489 individuals) that compared the effects of St. John’s wort to those of a placebo or conventional antidepressant medication over a period of four to twelve weeks. The researchers discovered that St. John’s wort extracts were as effective as traditional antidepressants and may even be more beneficial than a placebo.

In their paper, the authors point out that studies done in German-speaking nations (where St.

Possible Side Effects

It is possible that those using an oral St. John’s wort supplement for a short length of time can encounter adverse effects. These may include the following:

  • Mild stomach upset, diarrhea, dry mouth, headache, fatigue, dizziness, anxiety, restlessness, tingling, and allergic skin responses are all possibilities. Erectile dysfunction or sexual dysfunction
  • Dreams that are vivid
  • Liver damage
  • Psychosis (in rare cases)

When used topically, St. John’s wort has the potential to induce a skin rash. It has also been shown that St. John’s wort (taken orally or used topically) might increase your skin and ocular sensitivity to sunshine. If you have a medical condition such as lupus or are taking medication that might cause photosensitivity (such as some acne medicines), talk to your doctor or pharmacist about the risks and benefits of taking St. John’s wort.

Possible Drug Interactions

Because of the way St. John’s wort is broken down by the liver, it has the potential to create significant interactions with routinely prescribed drugs.

It is possible for the herb to interact with drugs in a variety of ways. It has the potential to make certain medications less effective while increasing the effectiveness of others. The following drugs are examples of those that may interact with St. John’s Wort:

  • Antibiotics, antidepressants, oral contraceptives, immunosuppressants, blood thinners such as warfarin, and other medications are all available. Anxiety-reducing sedatives and medicines are prescribed. Drugs used in the treatment of cancer, heart disease, and HIV/AIDS. Medications available over-the-counter (for sleep, coughing, and colds)

St. John’s wort might potentially interact with other herbs and vitamins, so be cautious while using it. If you are using St. John’s wort, you should avoid taking any nutritional supplement or cure that has the potential to elevate serotonin levels, such as 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), L-tryptophan, or SAMe. The use of St. John’s wort in conjunction with antidepressants or any other medication that boosts serotonin levels can result in serotonin syndrome, a potentially deadly illness caused by an excess of serotonin.

If you notice any of these symptoms, stop taking St.

The illness is potentially lethal if left untreated.

Contraindications

Some people have reported that using a supplement such as St. John’s wort is dangerous in certain settings, while others have reported that they require an adjusted amount. Taking St. John’s wort should be discussed with your doctor before beginning any new treatment if you are pregnant, nursing, attempting to conceive, or taking oral contraceptives (birth control pills). St. John’s wort may exacerbate symptoms in persons who have specific medical disorders, such as:

  • Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
  • Bipolar disorder (which may cause mania or increase the pace of cycling)
  • And other disorders Depression of extreme severity
  • The diagnosis of schizophrenia (which increases the probability of psychosis)
  • Alzheimer’s disease is a kind of dementia.

The use of some herbal supplements, such as St. John’s wort, may raise your risk of difficulties if you are put under anesthesia, according to some study. For two weeks before surgery, you should refrain from using St. John’s wort or any other herbal supplement. If you have had an organ transplant, you will need to avoid St. John’s wort since it can interfere with the drugs that are used to assist prevent transplant rejection and cause the transplant to fail.

Dosage and Preparation

There is insufficient scientific evidence to prescribe a normal dose of St. John’s wort, yet there are amounts that are routinely used by researchers who are exploring the herb’s effect on depression. In NIH-funded studies, participants were given a 300mg dosage of a specified concentration of St. John’s wort extract three times a day, with the amount increasing as the study progressed (900mg daily total). The highest daily dose was 1,800mg, which was administered twice a day. A total of 1,300mg per day was administered on an average daily basis for eight weeks over the course of the study.

  1. John’s Wort for you.
  2. St.
  3. There are dry, oil, and liquid formulations, as well as tinctures, capsules, and elixirs, available for purchase.
  4. John’s wort.
  5. In the case of depression, you may discover that taking a daily tablet of St.
  6. All preparations of the herb should be stored in a cold, dry environment to ensure that their potency is maintained.
  7. John’s wort, which is why the supplements are frequently housed in a dark-colored container.

The items containing St. John’s wort must be stored in a secure location, just like any other type of medication. Herbal supplements, unlike prescription and over-the-counter medications, are not always packaged in child-resistant containers.

What to Look For

St. John’s wort is commonly accessible in pharmacies, supermarkets, and health food stores, and it is available in a variety of dosages to suit individual needs. Check the Supplement Facts label on the product you chose to be sure you’re getting the right amount of the active ingredient(s). This label also contains information about any other components that may be present in the supplement. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommends that consumers search for items that have received a seal of approval from a third-party group that does quality testing, such as the United States Pharmacopeia, Consumer Lab, or the National Sanitation Foundation International.

A mark of approval, on the other hand, does not guarantee the safety or effectiveness of a product.

A Word From Verywell

If you or someone you love is suffering from depression, you may be looking for alternative treatment options to help you manage your symptoms more effectively. It’s important to engage with your healthcare professional and explore if St. John’s wort is appropriate for you rather than attempting it on your own, despite the hopeful results of studies on the herb. When it comes to depression, delaying or foregoing therapy might have catastrophic effects. Keep in mind to inform each health care professional with whom you engage about all of the prescriptions you are taking, including herbal or nutritional supplements, to ensure that no potentially hazardous interactions arise throughout the course of your treatment.

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