What Is Saint Catherine Of Siena Known For

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St. Catherine of Siena – Saints & Angels

She was born on March 25, 1347, in the Italian city of Siena, amid an epidemic of the plague. She is known as the “Saint Catherine of Siena.” She was the 25th child born to her mother, despite the fact that half of her siblings and sisters did not live to adulthood with her. Catherine herself was a twin, but her sister did not make it through the first year of life. Her mother was 40 years old at the time of her birth. Her father was a fabric dyer, and she grew up in such environment. Catherine’s sister, Bonaventura, died when she was 16 years old, leaving her husband a widower.

As a substitute for Catherine, his parents offered that they marry her; however, Catherine was adamantly opposed to the idea.

Her parents tried all they could to prevent her from marrying, but they were ultimately unsuccessful.

Catherine once remarked that she saw her father as a representation of Jesus, her mother as a representation of Our Lady, and her brothers as representations of the apostles, and that this encouraged her to serve them with humility.

  • Dominic, which allowed her to maintain a religious affiliation while continuing to live in her family home.
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  • Help NowSisters from the Dominican Order taught St.
  • Meanwhile, she led a tranquil and solitary life inside the confines of her family home.
  • Catherine acquired a practice of giving things away, and she was especially kind with her family’s food and clothing, which she distributed to those in need on a regular basis.

Something happened to her when she was 21 years old.

St.

St.

People are transformed by such mystical experiences, and St.

In her vision, she was instructed to return to public life and to assist the destitute and the sick.

She made frequent visits to hospitals and nursing homes, where the destitute and sick may be found.

Saint Catherine was dragged farther into the world as she worked, and finally she began to travel, appealing for reform of the Church as well as for people to confess and love God with all of their hearts and minds.

She was also attributed with playing a role in the beginning of a crusade to the Holy Land.

St.

For her confessor and spiritual director, she chose Bl.

St.

The Pope at Avignon was persuaded to return to Rome as a result of her prayer for peace, which was essential in bringing about the end of the war.

She also founded a women’s monastery outside of Siena in 1377, which continues to this day.

Eventually, St.

She is widely regarded as one of the most prominent and popular saints in the Catholic tradition.

The orders of her confessor, Raymond, to eat were refused by her, who said that she was having difficulty eating and that she would get ill as a result.

Several weeks later, she was no longer able to use her legs.

Catherine’s feast day is April 29, and she is the patron saint of fires, illness, the United States, Italy, miscarriages and those who have been mocked for their religious beliefs, as well as of nurses who have been tempted by sexual temptation.

8 Things to Know and Share About St. Catherine of Siena

On March 25, 1347, St. Catherine of Siena was born in Siena, Italy, amid the onset of the plague. Even though she was the 25th child to be born to her mother, half of her siblings and sisters died before she reached the age of majority. Despite the fact that Catherine was born as a twin, her sibling did not make it through infancy. The age of her mother at the time of her birth was forty years old. A textile dyer was her father’s profession. Catherine’s sister, Bonaventura, died when she was 16 years old, leaving her husband a widower.

  • As a substitute for Catherine, his parents recommended that they marry her; however, Catherine was adamantly opposed to the proposal.
  • Their attempts to derail her decision and keep her from marrying were ultimately futile.
  • Her father, she added, was a symbol of Jesus, her mother was a representation of Our Lady, and her brothers were representations of the apostles, and this encouraged her to serve them in a humble manner.
  • Dominic, which allowed her to maintain a religious affiliation while continuing to live in her family’s household.
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Help NowSisters from the Dominican Order taught St.

She continued to live quietly and alone at her family’s house during this time period.

Catherine established a practice of giving things away, and she was particularly generous with her family’s food and clothes, which she distributed to others in need throughout her community.

A mystical marriage to Christ, as she expressed it, was the culmination of her life.

Catherine is the subject of heated discussion, with some believing she was presented with a jewel-encrusted band, while others believe the band was fashioned of Jesus’s skin, according to legend.

Catherine herself began the story of the latter in her writings, although she was also well-known for claiming that the ring itself was invisible on a number of different occasions.

Catherine was no exception.

She returned to her family right away and went into the community to assist those who were in need of her assistance.

Her charitable acts immediately drew the attention of others, who joined her in her goal to assist the impoverished and sick in her community.

Catherine was dragged further and deeper into the world, and finally she began to travel, asking for reform of the Church and for people to confess and love God with all their hearts.

A crusade to the Holy Land was also ascribed to her for her assistance in getting it off to a start.

Supposedly, the stigmata was bestowed upon St.

In the role of confessor and spiritual director, she chose Bl.

St.

The Pope at Avignon was persuaded to return to Rome after she petitioned for it and had a key role in achieving it.

Also in 1377, just outside of Siena, she founded a women’s convent.

Eventually, St.

As a saint, she is one of the most prominent and well-known figures in the Catholic Church.

Despite the fact that she had been told by Raymond that she needed to eat, she refused, saying that she was having difficulty doing so and that she could get sick.

Several weeks later, she was no longer able to move her legs.

A stroke had occurred barely a week before her death on April 29. Catherine’s feast day is April 29, and she is the patron saint of fires, sickness, the United States, Italy, miscarriages and anyone who have been mocked for their religious beliefs, as well as of nurses.

1. Who is St. Catherine of Siena?

In 2010, Pope Benedict delivered an audience in which he presented the fundamental facts of her life, which included the following: She was born in Siena, Italy, in 1347, into a great family, and died in Rome, Italy, in 1380. At the age of 16, Catherine was inspired by a vision of St. Dominic to join the Third Order of the Dominicans, specifically the Mantellate, which is the female branch of the Dominicans. While still at home, she renewed her vow of virginity, which she had taken secretly when she was a young adolescent, and committed herself to prayer, penance, and charitable acts, particularly those for the benefit of the sick, during her time there.

Despite this, she experienced a great deal during her life!

2. What happened after St. Catherine entered religious life?

There are quite a few things. St. Catherine was sought after as a spiritual counselor, and she was instrumental in bringing the Papacy of Avignon to an end (when the pope, though still the bishop of Rome, actually lived in Avignon, France). In his explanation, Pope Benedict explains that as the fame of her holiness spread, she became the focus of an intense activity of spiritual guidance for people from every walk of life: nobles and politicians, artists and ordinary people, consecrated men and women and religious, including Pope Gregory XI, who was living in Avignon at the time and whom she urged to return to Rome with zeal and effectiveness.

She traveled extensively in order to urge for internal change in the Church as well as to promote peace among the nations.

In addition,

3. Did she face opposition in her lifetime?

Catherine experienced immense suffering, as did many of the saints, according to Pope Benedict XVI. Some even believed they couldn’t put their faith in her, to the extent that the General Chapter of the Dominicans called her to Florence in 1374, six years before her execution, to question her. She was eventually executed. They chose Raymund of Capua, a scholarly and modest Friar who would go on to become the Order’s future Master General, to serve as her spiritual advisor. He produced the first detailed biography of the Saint after becoming her confessor and “spiritual son” in the course of his ministry.

4. How has her legacy developed over time?

She was canonized in 1461, according to Pope Benedict XVI. Catherine’s teachings are included in theDialogue of Divine ProvidenceorLibro della Divina Dottrina, a classic of spiritual literature, in herEpistolario, and in a collection of herPrayers, all of which were written after she had learned to read and write as an adult. The excellence of her teaching was recognized by Pope Paul VI in 1970, who elevated her to the rank of Doctor of the Church, adding it to her other honors, which include those of Co-Patroness of the City of Rome — granted at the request of Bl.

Pius IX — and Patroness of Italy — granted at the direction of Venerable Pius XII.

5. St. Catherine reported experiencing a “mystical marriage” with Jesus. What was this?

Her canonization was completed in 1461, according to Pope Benedict XVI. In theDialogue of Divine ProvidenceorLibro della Divina Dottrina, a classic of spiritual literature and in Catherine’s Epistolario and collection of prayers, the teachings of Catherine, who learned to read with difficulty as a child and learned to write as an adult, are contained. The excellence of her teaching was recognized by Pope Paul VI in 1970, who elevated her to the rank of Doctor of the Church, adding it to her other honors, which include those of Co-Patroness of the City of Rome — granted at the request of Bl.

6. What can we learn from this that we can apply in our own lives?

“Like the saint of Siena, every believer is conscious of the need to be conformed with the feelings of Christ’s heart in order to love God and his neighbor as Christ himself loves,” Pope Benedict adds. And we may all allow our hearts to be transformed and grow to love like Christ via a familiarity with him that is fostered by prayer, meditation on God’s Word, and the sacraments, most especially by receiving Holy Communion on a regular basis and with devotion, as well as by other means. I finished my Apostolic Exhortation Sacramentum Caritatis with a list of Saints who are committed to the Eucharist, and Catherine is among them (cf.

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94).

7. St. Catherine experienced a “gift of tears.” What was this?

A second characteristic of Catherine’s spirituality is tied to her gift of weeping, as explained by Pope Benedict XVI. They demonstrate an acute and profound sensitivity, as well as an ability to be moved and to be compassionate with others. There have been many Saints who have been blessed with the ability to shed tears, renewing the emotion of Jesus himself, who did not hold back or hide his tears at the tomb of his friend Lazarus, at the grief of Mary and Martha, or at the sight of Jerusalem during his final days on this earth, nor did he hold back or hide his tears at the tomb of his friend Lazarus or at the sight of Jerusalem.

8. St. Catherine at one point uses a symbolic image of Christ as a bridge. What is the significance of this image?

Catherine’s spirituality also possesses a quality associated with the gift of tears, as explained by Pope Benedict. A delicate, profound sensitivity is expressed in their ability to be moved and tender, as well as in their ability to be tender themselves. As a result, many Saints have been endowed with the ability to shed tears, renewing the emotion of Jesus himself, who, during his final days on earth, did not hold back or hide his tears when he visited the tomb of his friend Lazarus, when he felt the grief of Mary and Martha, when he saw the city of Jerusalem, and when he saw the tomb of his friend Lazarus.

In the words of Catherine, the tears of saints are mixed with the blood of Christ, about which she talked in vivacious tones and with symbolic imagery that were extremely impressive.

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The original version of this item published on April 27, 2013 at the Register.

Saint Catherine of Siena

The Life and Times of Saint Catherine of Siena Catherine holds entire submission to Christ as a major value in her brief life, and this value comes through loud and clear in her reflections and experiences throughout. Most amazing about her is that she comes to see her submission to the Lord as a goal that she must work towards through time, rather than a destination. Innocenta Benincasa was the 23rd child of Jacopo and Lapa Benincasa and was raised as a bright, happy, and devoutly religious young lady.

  • Her father ordered that she be left alone, and she was given a chamber of her own where she could pray and meditate in solitude.
  • After a while, a gathering of devotees began to form around Mary, including men and women, priests and religious.
  • Her writings, which were primarily intended for spiritual education and encouragement of her followers, began to take an increasing interest in current events.
  • At the Dominican General Chapter of 1374, she was found not guilty of all allegations against her.
  • She devoted her life to the crusade against the Turks as well as to bringing about peace between Florence and the Pope.
  • Her final two years were spent in Rome, arguing for Pope Urban VI’s cause as well as the unity of the Church, and she died there on December 31, 1997.
  • It was 1461 when she died, surrounded by her “children,” and that year she was canonized.
  • In 1939, she and Francis of Assisi were named co-patrons of Italy, a position they held until their deaths.
  • It is in The Dialogue that she reveals her spiritual testament.
  • Her biographies are filled with events that can make us cringe, giggle, or even yawn: a spiritual encounter at the age of six, a childhood betrothal to Christ, accounts of hard asceticism, and her regular ecstatic visions, to name a few.

It is her awareness of holiness as a goal to be pursued over the course of a lifetime that has lasting significance for us today. Saint Catherine of Siena is the patron saint of the following countries: Europe Fire Prevention is important. Italy

Click here for more on Saint Catherine of Siena!

St. Catherine was a Dominican of the Third Order who served as a mediator and advisor to the Pope. She was the sole person responsible for bringing the heirs of Peter out of exile at Avignon in the 14th century. She is the co-patron of Italy as well as the continent of Europe. Catherine Benincasa was the 23rd of Jacopo and Lapa Benincasa’s 25 children, and she was born on the feast of the Annunciation, March 25, 1347, in Siena. Her identical twin sister died when she was a child. As a kid, she had an extremely autonomous personality, as well as an unusually profound devotion to religion.

  1. This was the beginning of her mystical visions.
  2. When her parents decided that she should marry when she was 16, she shaved her hair to make herself appear less attractive, and her father, recognizing that he couldn’t compete with her determination, agreed to let her have her way with her decision.
  3. St.
  4. She came to the end of her solitary at this time and began to care for the sick, the destitute, and the disenfranchised, particularly the lepers.

As a young woman in her twenties, the Lord called her to a more public life, and she began to correspond with many influential figures, offering them advice and admonishing them while exhorting them to holiness, including the Pope himself, whom she never hesitated to rebuke when the situation demanded it.

She was able to accomplish this while on her deathbed.

She got the stigmata in 1375 when visiting Pisa, despite the fact that they never manifested on her body throughout her lifetime, as a result of a prayer she sent to God.

They only emerged on her incorruptible body after she died, indicating that she was still alive. She died at Rome on April 29, 1380, when she was just 33 years old.

St. Catherine of Siena

As a Dominican of the third order, she was a mediator and advisor to Pope Pius XII. Her solitary act brought the heirs of Peter out of exile at Avignon in the fourteenth century. She is the co-patron of Italy as well as of the entire continent of Europa. Catherine Benjamin Benincasa was the 23rd child born to Jacopo and Lapa Benincasa on March 25, 1347, the feast of the Annunciation, in Siena. When she was a little child, her twin sister perished. In her childhood, she had an extraordinarily self-sufficient nature and a devotion to prayer that was especially ardent.

  • This was the beginning of her mystical journey.
  • When her parents decided that she should marry when she was 16, she shaved her hair to make herself appear less attractive, and her father, recognizing that he couldn’t compete with her determination, agreed to let her have her way with the decision.
  • During the course of her spiritual ecstasies, St.
  • The end of her seclusion marked the beginning of her work as a health-care provider for those who were sick or impoverished or stigmatized, particularly lesbians and homosexuals.
  • Two of these disciples later became her confessors and biographers, and together they served Christ among the destitute with even more zeal.

She is credited with many important political accomplishments, including bringing about peace between the Holy See and Florence, persuading the Pope to return from exile in Avignon, which he did in 1376, and bridging the great schism between supporters of the legitimate Pope, Urban VI, and those who opposed him, which was healed in 1380.

A collection of mystical visions that she dictated while in a state of spiritual ecstasy is preserved in her Dialogues, which have become masterpieces of Italian literature.

Only after her death did they manifest themselves on her incorruptible form. In 1380, she was 33 years old when she died in Rome on April 29th.

Further Reading on St. Catherine of Siena

St. Catherine was a Dominican of the Third Order, a mediator, and a counselor to the Pope. At the 14th century, she was the sole person responsible for bringing the heirs of Peter back from exile in Avignon. She is the co-patron of Italy as well as of the European Union. Catherine Benincasa was the 23rd of Jacopo and Lapa Benincasa’s 25 children, and she was born on the Feast of the Annunciation, March 25, 1347, in Siena. Her twin sister died when she was a child. As a kid, she demonstrated an extremely autonomous personality, as well as an unusually profound devotion to prayer.

In the same year, she made a pledge to Christ to devote her virginity.

She joined the Dominican Tertiaries and lived a deep and secluded life of prayer and meditation for the next three years, during which she experienced continual mystical experiences that culminated in an amazing union with God, known as’mystical marriage,’ that is granted to just a few mystics.

Catherine had many profound times of despair in addition to her spiritual ecstasies, and she frequently felt completely abandoned by God.

As her holiness and unusual personality became known across Siena, she attracted a group of disciples, two of whom went on to become her confessors and biographers, and together they went even farther in their service to Christ among the impoverished.

She is credited with many important political accomplishments, including bringing about peace between the Holy See and Florence, persuading the Pope to return from exile in Avignon, which he did in 1376, and bridging the great schism between supporters of the legitimate Pope, Urban VI, and those who opposed him, which occurred in 1380.

It is her Dialogues, which are considered to be masterpieces of Italian literature, that serve as a record of her spiritual visions, which she dictated while suffering from mystical ecstasy.

She got the stigmata in 1375 when visiting Pisa, despite the fact that they never manifested on her body during her lifetime, as a result of a prayer she made to God. They only emerged on her incorruptible body after she had died. She died at Rome on April 29, 1380, when she was 33 years old.

Additional Biography Sources

Barbara Baldwin’s biography of Catherine of Siena was published by Our Sunday Visitor Publishing Division in Huntington, Indiana in 1987. ‘My nature is fire: Saint Catherine of Siena,’ written by Catherine M. Meade and published by Alba House in 1991 in New York, N.Y. Suzanne Noffke’s Catherine of Siena: seeing from a faraway eye was published by Liturgical Press in Collegeville, Minnesota, in 1996. The life of Raymond, of Capua, and the. Scolar Press published Sainct Catharine of Siena in Ilkley, England in 1978.

St. Catherine of Siena

Theologian and Doctor of the Church (1347–1380). Caterina di Giacomo di Benincasa was born on the feast of the Annunciation, March 25th, 1347, in the Fontebranda district of Siena, Italy, the twenty-fourth of twenty-five children. She was the daughter of Giacomo di Benincasa and Caterina di Giacomo di Benincasa. Her father worked as a dyer, and her mother was the daughter of a well-known poet in the community. Catherine was well-known as a youngster who was creative, idealistic, and extroverted, as well as fiercely self-sufficient.

  1. Catherine gave her virginity to Christ when she was seven years old, and she began wearing the Dominican Tertiary’s habit when she was sixteen years old, taking the vows of Poverty, Chastity, and Obedience in the process.
  2. She lived during a century in which disorder reigned supreme over the Church and society.
  3. Her deep love for God, as well as the clarity with which she articulated this love, had a tremendous impact on the community in which she lived and on the larger culture in a very practical sense.
  4. Catherine died in Rome in 1380, at the age of thirty-three, and was commemorated as a saint.
  5. Catherine of Siena by Pope Pius II took place in 1461, and she was appointed the Patron Saint of Italy on May 5, 1940, by Pope Pius XII.
  6. Saint John Paul II declared her to be the Patron Saint of Siena, the Patron Saint of Italy, as well as Europe’s patron saint in October 1999, and she holds these titles simultaneously.
  7. Catherine is currently interred in a tomb in the Basilica di Santa Maria sopra Minerva in Rome, and her head is placed in the San Domenico Church in Siena, Italy, where it remains incorrupt.
  8. Catherine of Siena is one of only four female “Doctors” of the Roman Catholic Church, and she is the patron saint of women (St.
  9. Therese of Lisieux, and St.
  10. She is referred to as the “Doctor of Unity” because she was instrumental in bringing the Papacy back to Rome after almost a century spent in France.
  11. Catherine dictated four treatises titled “The Dialogues” under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, which are now considered canonical.

Saint Catherine of Siena Academy is named after her because of her devotion to Jesus and her testament to the feminine genius. Saint Catherine of Siena is the patron saint of the academy. Please, St. Catherine of Siena, intercede for us!

Catherine of Siena

Sign up for Christianity Today and you’ll gain instant access to back issues of Christian History! It is not enough to love Me for your own sake, or to love your neighbor for your own reason; rather, it is necessary to love Me for My own sake, yourself for My own sake, your neighbor for My own sake. Catherine of Siena was inspired by a supernatural vision. Catherine used to go to a cave near her house in Siena on a regular basis as a young girl to contemplate, fast, and pray. She claimed to have experienced a vision of Jesus with the apostles Peter, Paul, and John the evangelist when she was approximately seven years old, and she subsequently informed her parents of her decision to lead a monastic life.

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It was through the efforts of this amazing girl that she flowered into a woman who was no less outstanding in her spiritual, moral, and political endeavors.

Timeline

1302 Unam Sanctamproclaims papal supremacy
1309 Papacy begins “Babylonian” exile in Avignon
1321 Dante Completes Divine Comedy
1347 Catherine of Siena born
1380 Catherine of Siena dies
1418 Thomas á Kempis writes The Imitation of Christ

Mystical child

In the middle-class Sienese wool dyer’s family, Caterina Benincasa was born as the twenty-third of 25 children, and her birth generated little commotion. This year’s events also included the introduction of an infectious flea carrying the bacteria Yersinia pestis into the Italian port of Messina, which resulted in an unprecedented epidemic known as the “Black Death.” Between 1348 and 1350, more than one-third of Europe perished, a period that lasted only three years. Baby Catherine survived the attack and, as an adult, was instrumental in saving the lives of countless plague victims by her sympathetic nursing.

  • She claimed to have gotten an unseen stigmata (for the sake of humility), which she said allowed her to feel the wounds of Christ.
  • Catherine felt she could do more than just live a quiet life; she wanted to aid the destitute and the sick.
  • Catherine was persuaded to enter the Dominican Order of Penance (later known as the Dominican Third Order) in 1363 by the influence of her cousin, a Dominican priest who served as her first confessor and mentor.
  • Catherine died at the age of 19 after a brief illness.
  • Catherine had what she subsequently characterized as a “spiritual marriage” with Christ at the conclusion of her three-year isolation from the outside world.

The ring was placed on her finger by Jesus, and she was brought into mystical connection with God as a result of this vision. She referred to this condition as a “inner cell in her spirit,” and it was what kept her going throughout her life as she traveled and preached.

Mysticism in action

Following her conversion, Catherine launched an active ministry among Siena’s destitute, ill, and imprisoned. During a plague epidemic that swept over her hometown in 1374, the majority of the population fled, but she and her followers remained to nurse the sick and bury the dead. She was supposed to be relentless at all hours of the day and night, curing all those in whom the doctors had given up hope; some even said she revived the dead. When the crisis was over, she began a letter-writing ministry with the goal of converting sinners and reforming the church and society as a whole.

  • Because of political intrigue in the early fourteenth century, the pope had been relocated to Avignon, France.
  • For the second time, the popes became further enslaved by French politics and lifestyle, which were luxurious and corrupt at the time.
  • I command you to come, come, come!
  • It was the crowning achievement of her public career.

As she wrote in her journal, God instructed her to “not love Me for your own sake, or your neighbor for your own sake, but to love Me as I am for myself, yourself as I am for Myself, and your neighbor as I am for Myself.” It was the image of a bleeding Christ, the Redeemer, that was at the center of Catherine’s teaching: a Christ who was ablaze with ardent generosity, ready sacrifice, and unconditional forgiveness.

Moreover, it was not the cross or the nails that secured Christ to the tree; they were not powerful enough to keep hold of the God-Man.

She keeps a journal of God’s messages to her: “My son’s nailed feet serve as a stairway that leads to his side, where you will be able to see his innermost thoughts and feelings disclosed.

peered with her mental eye into my son’s opened heart, she will begin to experience the love of her own heart in my son’s consummate and unfathomable love.” Catherine died in Rome when she was 33 years old.

In 1970, the Roman Catholic Church elevated her to the rank of doctor of the church, a distinction shared by just 31 other people in the world (and only one other woman).

About St. Catherine of Siena

Saint Catherine of Siena was born on March 25, 1347, in Siena, Italy, along with her twin brother, who died shortly after birth. She was the first female saint to be canonized. Catherine’s parents, Lapa Piagenti and Giacomo di Benincasa, had a total of 25 children, including Catherine and her twin brother, Giacomo di Benincasa. Catherina’s family was nurtured in the Catholic faith, and she had a deep affection for everyone she met, especially her own family. She added that it was simpler for her to love her family because she imagined her father as Jesus, her mother as Mary, and her brothers as the apostles in the New Testament.

  1. Catherine was seven years old when she saw a vision of Jesus with a slew of well-known saints from the time period behind him.
  2. Following this vision, she took personal vows that were comparable to those taken by members of religious orders.
  3. Catherine’s sister died when she was 16 years old, leaving behind a husband and a child.
  4. Catherine reacted by cutting her hair and committing herself to a life of intense fasting in order to make herself appear less appealing to others around her.
  5. Catherine was prompted by a vision of St.
  6. She accepted the order after gaining her parents’ agreement, which she preferred over live in a convent because it allowed her to remain in her home with her family.
  7. Catherine has given up the things of her family without their consent on several occasions in order to assist people who she believed were in greater need.

When compared to modern-day Italy, there were far more individuals who were impoverished and sick during Catherine’s lifetime than there are today.

The plague was responsible for the deaths of around one-third of Europe’s population.

This state of mind would occasionally entail Catherine being completely unresponsive, even while she was in agony.

When Catherine was in her twenties, she experienced a state of euphoria in which she had a conversation with God.

Because Catherine is illiterate, she was unable to document anything herself; as a result, following this harrowing encounter, she continued repeating the discourse that her sisters would record.

Catherine was well-known for referring to Jesus as a bridge in one of her analogies.

Catherine was endowed with the stigmata during a different mystical encounter in 1375, however it was only visible to her at the time of the event.

After Pope Clement’s death, the papacy remained at Avignon, despite the cries of innumerable people who wished for each pope to return to the city of Rome.

By this time, Pope Gregory XI was in power as Peter’s successor, and Catherine traveled to Avignon to confront the pope face to face.

In response to Catherine’s reference to a pledge that Gregory had made before becoming Pope, Gregory XI was taken completely by surprise.

Despite his reservations about returning to Rome, Pope Gregory XI grudgingly did so in January 1377, despite his concerns about the potential for political repercussions of his decision.

Catherine had been suffering from a chronic illness for some years, and her health was deteriorating.

After a while, she just didn’t have an appetite.

She pleaded with God to pardon her for all of her failures and shortcomings.

Catherine was canonized by Pope Pius II in 1461, making her the first female saint.

Pope Paul VI made St.

Some found this surprising because women are disproportionately underrepresented in positions of power in the United States.

Despite the fact that St. Catherine lacked the formal education of saints such as St. Thomas Aquinas, she expressed profound truths as a result of the very deep love that she had with God. To learn more about St. Catherine and her life, please see the links provided below the fold.

10 Amazing Facts You Didn’t Know About St. Catherine of Siena – EpicPew

In the month of April, the Catholic Church commemorates the life of Saint Catherine of Siena (March 25, 1347 – April 29, 1380), who died on April 29. It is important for all Catholics to be familiar with and develop a profound devotion to Saint Catherine of Siena, especially in these trying times in society. Here are five interesting facts about this holy woman that you may not have known.

1. Catherine came into the world seemingly ready to proclaim the Lord Jesus Christ: she was born on theSolemnity of the Annunciation of the Lord(March 25, 1347).

Quick facts for kidsSaint Catherine of Siena
St. Catherine of Siena,byGiovanni Battista Tiepolo
Virgin; Doctor of Church
Born March 25, 1347Siena, Republic of Siena
Died April 29, 1380 (aged 33)Rome,Papal States
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church;Anglican Communion;Lutheranism
Canonized 29 June 1461 byPope Pius II
Majorshrine Santa Maria sopra Minerva,Romeand Shrine of Saint Catherine,Siena
Feast April 29; April 30 (Roman Calendar, 1628–1969)
Attributes Dominicantertiaries’ habit,lily, book, crucifix, heart,crown of thorns,stigmata, ring, dove, rose, skull, miniature church, miniature ship bearing Papal coat of arms
Patronage against fire; bodily ills; diocese of Allentown, Pennsylvania, USA; Europe; illness; Italy; miscarriages; sick people; sickness;nurses

Assaint Catherine of SienaTOSD lived from March 25, 1347, to April 29, 1380, and was born in Italy. She was born in Siena and died in Rome, where she was buried. She worked to bring about peace in Italy and is one of the country’s two patron saints, the other being Saint Francis of Assisi. Katerina de Benincasa was born in western Italy, the 25th child in a family of 25 children. She was born during the period of the Black Death, often known as the Bubonic Plague. Despite the fact that it most likely killed many of her acquaintances, she did not get the sickness and survived the outbreak.

  1. Her family belonged to the lower classes, and she did not learn to read and write until the year 1378.
  2. Throughout her life, she continued to receive several visions from the Lord.
  3. She joined the Third Order of Saint Dominic when she was 16 years old, and eventually became a Dominican nun.
  4. She also committed her life to developing the Catholic church by assisting the sick, the destitute, and those who were spiritually disadvantaged.
  5. She also attempted to start a new Crusade to the Holy Land, namely Jerusalem, but was unsuccessful.
  6. She was canonized in 1461 and later elevated to the rank of Doctor of the Church by Pope Paul VI in 1970, as well as being named a patron saint of Europe in 1999.
  7. 1475, is a book on the divine dottrina.

Images for kids

  • It is the house of Saint Catherine in Siena, with a statue by Neroccio di Bartolomeo de’ Landi (1475), in the courtyard. The Mystic Marriage of Saint Catherine of Siena, by Giovanni di Paolo, is a painting by Giovanni di Paolo. The Sarcophagus of Catherine, which is located beneath the High Altar of Santa Maria sopra Minerva in Rome. In the Basilica of San Domenico in Siena, the Chapel of Saint Catherine is located
  • Michele de Meo’s Catherine of Siena, Patroness of Europe, 2003, Chapel of St. James, Church of Santa Maria sopra Minerva
  • And in the Basilica of San Domenico in Siena, the Chapel of Saint Catherine is located. Domenico Beccafumi, The Miraculous Communion of St. Catherine of Siena, 1513–1515, Getty Center, Los Angeles, California
  • Domenico Beccafumi, St. Catherine of Siena Receiving the Stigmata, 1513–1515, Getty Center, Los Angeles, California
  • Domenico Beccafumi, The Miraculous Communion of St. Catherine of Siena, 1513–1515, Getty Center, Los The Virgin Mary Giving the Rosary to St. Dominic and St. Catherine of Siena, Church of Santa Agata in Trastevere, Rome (bottom of painting: the souls in Purgatory await the prayers of the faithful)
  • Giovanni di Paolo, St. Catherine of Siena, c. 1475, tempera and gold on panel
  • Giovanni di Paolo, The Virgin Mary Giving the Rosary to St. Dominic and St. Catherine of Siena, Church of Santa Agata in Trastever Cambridge, England: Fogg Art Museum
  • The office of the taxcollector (biccherna) of Siena by an unknown artist, 1451-1452, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam
  • And The office of the taxcollector (biccherna) of Siena, 1451-1452, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam. Among those who appear in this artwork are Fray Pedro de Santa Mara Ulloa, Saint Catherine of Siena, and the servant of God Mary of Jesus de León y Delgado. This painting is a representation of the Virgin handing the rosary to Saint Dominic. The fresco may be seen at the Church of Santo Domingo in San Cristóbal de La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain
  • The church is dedicated to St. Dominic. French artist Francesco Brizzi created the mystic communion of St Catherine. a head that is on display in the Basilica of San Domenico in Siena
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St Catherine of Siena: the Patron Saint of Nurses

Caterina di Jacopo di Benincasa, formerly known as Caterina di Jacopo di Benincasa, was born in Siena, Italy, in 1374, and is widely regarded as a highly prominent Italian theologian, philosopher, and mystic, despite the fact that she was born and reared in a modest household. She was canonized by Pope Pius II in 1461, and, along with Saint Francis of Assisi, she is revered as the Patron Saint of Italy and the European Union. Furthermore, she is revered as the Patroness of Fire and Illness, the United States of America, miscarriages, those who are mocked for their religious beliefs, sexual temptation, and nurses, among other things.

Let’s find out everything there is to know about this world-famous Saint, who is commemorated every year on April 29, the anniversary of her death.

Charity and Patient Care

According to Saint Catherine, the most effective approach to become closer to God is to care for the poor and the ill, because these are the groups that most closely resemble Jesus Christ in their circumstances. Because of her remarkable commitment to God, she made the decision to devote her life, in particular, to sick individuals who were suffering from contagious diseases, because even doctors at the time refused to treat them. Since Italy was suffering from plague at the time, a large number of people fell ill and were forced to live on the margins in order to prevent the spread of the disease.

The St Catherine of Siena Medal may be of interest to you if you work as a nurse or if you typically provide care to those in need of assistance.

If you wish to express your gratitude to someone who has taken care of you, or continues to take care of you, at a time of physical vulnerability, the Saint Catherine of Siena Medal may be an original Catholic gift that will keep an eye on the person who is taking/has taken care of you.

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The Ecstasies of the Saint

Catherine, according to the accounts of her confessors, had several visions of Jesus Christ and other Saints during her life. She sought sanctuary in a hermitage when she was only six years old in order to fulfill her goal to be committed to God. The Virgin Mary and a number of Saints appeared to her one night when she was 20 years old; Jesus handed her a ring that she could only see, and they were married mystically by the Lord Jesus. In the years after her initiation into the Third Order of St Dominic, she saw several visions in which she conversed with Jesus Christ, her spiritual groom.

The Extreme Fasting of St Catherine of Siena

Saint Catherine became ill when she was 33 years old, most likely as a result of her excessive fasting. The fact that she was having difficulty eating and drinking was causing her condition to progress more quickly. Within weeks, she was unable to move her legs and died on April 29, 1830, following a stroke that had occurred barely a week before. She is still regarded as one of the most prominent and popular saints in the Catholic Church, even today.

St. Catherine of Siena Prayers

It is likely that her rigorous fasting contributed to her illness when she was 33 years old. As her sickness progressed, she found it increasingly difficult to consume food and liquids. Her legs were rendered useless within weeks, and she passed away on April 29, 1830, only a week after suffering a stroke. Despite the passage of time, she is still regarded as one of the Church’s most important and beloved saints.

7 Inspiring ideas from the great St. Catherine of Siena

The feast of St. Catherine of Siena will be celebrated on April 29th this year. A wonderful moment to reflect on this magnificent saint and all that she has to teach us is now! Even during her lifetime, St. Catherine was well-known for her piety and sanctity. She was a lay member of the Dominican Order who demonstrated supernatural generosity, prayer, and sacrifice in her daily life. Aside from that, she is well-known for her involvement in encouraging Pope Gregory XI to return to Rome after a visit to Avignon.

Catherine was one of the first woman saints to be recognized a Doctor of the Church, a distinction she earned as a result of her profound spiritual works.

Despite their seeming simplicity, these seven principles from her works are profound: Each one leaves us with a lot to think about and a lot to take to heart.

Who Was Catherine of Siena? Why Is She Considered Influential?

Saint Catherine of Siena (March 25, 1347–April 29, 1380) was an ascetic, mystic, activist, author, and saint lady of the Catholic Church. She was born in Siena, Italy, and lived there until her death. Catherine was a great role model for a more worldly and active spirituality, as seen by her aggressive and confrontational letters to bishops and popes, as well as her devotion to direct service to the ill and the impoverished. Catherine was far from being an anchoress.

Fast Facts: Catherine of Siena

  • Known For: She is the patron saint of Italy (together with Francis of Assisi)
  • She is credited with persuading Pope Pius XII to restore the pope from Avignon to Rome
  • She was one of two women to be appointed Doctors of the Church in 1970
  • She is a member of the Order of the Holy Cross. Caterina di Giacomo di Benincasa, also known as Caterina di Giacomo di Benincasa, was born on March 25, 1347, in Siena, Italy, to Giacomo di Benincasa and Lapa Piagenti. “The Dialogue” was one of his published works. He died on April 29, 1380 in Rome, Italy, and was canonized in 1461. Career: Dominican mystic and theologian with a tertiary degree from the Dominican Order.

Early Life and Becoming a Dominican

Catherine of Siena was born into a great family in the town of Siena. She was the youngest of 23 children and was born as a twin. Her father was a well-to-do dye manufacturer. Many of her male relatives worked in government or went into the priesthood, which she admired. Catherine began seeing religious visions when she was six or seven years old. She engaged in self-deprivation, with a particular emphasis on refraining from eating. She made a pledge of virginity, but she didn’t tell anyone about it, not even her parents.

Catherine had her hair chopped off, as is customary for nuns upon entering a monastery, and her parents scolded her for it until she confessed her pledge to serve.

Dominic in 1363, a religious order made up primarily of widows, allowing her to continue her education.

For her first three years in the order, she was confined to her chamber, with just her confessor as her sole contact.

Service as Vocation

She felt she had received a heavenly instruction to go out into the world and act as a way of redeeming souls while also working on her own salvation after the conclusion of her three-year period of seclusion. Around 1367, she had a spiritual marriage to Christ, presided over by Mary and other saints, and she was given a ring as a token of the union, which she said stayed on her finger throughout her life, visible only to her and her family. She engaged in a regimen of fasting and self-mortification, which included self-scourging, as well as regular communion.

Public Recognition

Her visions and trances drew a large number of followers, both religious and secular, and her counselors persuaded her to get more involved in the public and political spheres. She eventually did. Individuals and political elites began turning to her for help mediating disagreements and for spiritual guidance and guidance. Despite the fact that Catherine never learnt to write and received no formal education, she began to read when she was 20 years old. She dictated her letters and other writings to secretaries, who typed them up for her.

“The Dialogue” (also known as” Dialogues” or” Dialogo”) is the best-known of her writings.

In one of her visions, she was marked with the stigmata of Christ, which occurred in 1375.

This year, the city of Florence approached her about negotiating the resolution of a dispute with the pope’s government in Rome, which she accepted.

The Pope was under the sway of the French government and church when he was at Avignon at the time. Many people were concerned that the Pope was losing control of the church since he was so far away.

The Pope at Avignon

Her religious writings and deeds (as well as her well-connected family or her instructor Raymond of Capua) led her to the notice of Pope Gregory XI, who was still at Avignon at the time of her arrival. She flew to Avignon, where she spoke with the Pope privately and pleaded with him to leave Avignon and return to Rome in order to accomplish “God’s will as well as mine.” While there, she also preached to a large number of people in the audience. The French wanted Pope Gregory to stay at Avignon, but Gregory, who was unwell at the time, most likely wished to travel to Rome so that the next Pope could be elected in that location.

As a result, Gregory returned to Rome in January 1377.

Bridget of Sweden) is credited with encouraging him to return to the monastery.

The Great Schism

While still at Avignon, her religious writings and good actions (as well as her well-connected family and her instructor Raymond of Capua) drew her to the notice of Pope Gregory XI, who was still there at the time. During her visit to Avignon, she met in private with the Pope and persuaded him that it was “God’s will and mine” for her to return to Rome and accomplish “God’s will as well as mine.” During her visit, she also preached to large crowds. Because Gregory was in poor health, the French wanted him to remain at Avignon, but Gregory preferred to remain in Rome so that the next Pope might be chosen there.

Gregory eventually returned to Rome in January 1377.

Holy Fasting and Death

Her religious writings and good actions (as well as her well-connected family or her instructor Raymond of Capua) drew her to the notice of Pope Gregory XI, who was still in Avignon at the time. She proceeded to Avignon, spoke with the Pope privately, and pleaded with him to leave Avignon and return to Rome in order to accomplish “God’s will as well as mine.” While there, she also preached to large crowds of people. The French desired that Gregory remain in Avignon, but Gregory, who was unwell, most likely want to return to Rome so that the next Pope might be elected there.

As a result, Gregory returned to Rome in January of 1377.

Bridget of Sweden) is credited with encouraging him to return to his homeland.

Legacy, Feminism, and Art

Her religious writings and good deeds (as well as her well-connected family or her instructor Raymond of Capua) drew her to the notice of Pope Gregory XI, who was still in Avignon at the time. She proceeded to Avignon and spoke with the Pope privately, pleading with him to abandon Avignon and return to Rome in order to accomplish “God’s will as well as mine.” During her visit, she also preached to large crowds of people. The French wanted Pope Gregory to stay at Avignon, but Gregory, who was in poor health, most likely wished to return to Rome so that the next Pope might be elected there.

In 1376, the city of Rome agreed to submit to papal power if the pope returned. So, in January 1377, Gregory returned to Rome. Catherine (together with St. Bridget of Sweden) is credited with encouraging him to come home.

Resources and Further Reading

  • Karen Armstrong is the author of this work. God-seeking Visionaries: Four Medieval Mystics and the Writings of Their Contemporaries Bantam Books, 1994
  • Caroline Walker Bynum, author. The Religious Importance of Food to Medieval Women: The Holy Feast and the Holy Fast Alice Curtayne, Alice Curtayne, University of California, 2010. Saint Catherine of Siena is a saint from the Italian city of Siena. Saint Caterina by Sheed and Ward, 1935
  • Da Siena, Sant’Agata. The Dialogue is a two-way street. Paulist Press, 1980
  • Da Capua, Saint Raimondo
  • Translation by Suzanne Noffke, Paulist Press, 1980. Legenda Major is the most important legend in the Bible. Giuseppi Tinagli’s translation was published by Cantagalli in 1934
  • A later translation was published by George Lamb as George Kaftal’s biography of St. Catherine of Siena was published by Harvill in 1960. St. Catherine shown in a painting from Tuscany. Suzanne Noffke’s novel, Blackfriars, was published in 1949. Catherine of Siena’s Vision as Seen Through a Distant Observer Michael Glazier (1996) and Elizabeth Alvilda Petroff (1996) Body and Soul: Essays on Medieval Women and Mysticism is a collection of essays on medieval women and mysticism. The University of Oxford published a paper in 1994 titled

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