What Is Saint Bernard The Patron Saint Of

Bernard of Clairvaux

The feast day is on August 20th. 1170 is the canonized version of the number. In order to get work done, you don’t always win a popularity contest by persuading others to do their fair amount of effort. Particularly if you believe you are correct and that everyone else (who does not agree with you) is incorrect. That very well sums up Bernard of Clairvaux’s character. He may not have had the greatest number of friends in the world, but he was a very effective leader. Bernard was raised by rich parents who adored him and supplied him with a comfortable environment.

When Bernard reached adulthood, he began training to be a soldier, but he soon realized that he could better serve God by not murdering others.

Bernard conducted an experiment with these members of his family and acquaintances.

His ability to bring people together was visible both then and subsequently.

  • His siblings and widowed father were among the numerous men who came to join the monastery, and it became necessary to construct more monasteries, some of which were in other countries, to accommodate the growing number of participants.
  • Bernard had a well-deserved reputation for being both extremely clever and extremely holy.
  • Even popes and monarchs sought his advice at one point or another.
  • In 1174, he was recognized a saint, and in 1830, he was named a Doctor of the Church.
  • St.

Saint Bernard of Clairvaux

  • Learn about the life of Saint Bernard of Clairvaux by reading his writings. An overview of the life of St. Bernard of Clairvaux. Contunico is a trademark of ZDF Enterprises GmbH, Mainz. See all of the videos related to this topic. Discover the history of Clairvaux Abbey, as well as the origins of the Cistercian Order. Overview of Clairvaux Abbey in France, including a study of the Cistercian religious order. Contunico is a trademark of ZDF Enterprises GmbH, Mainz. See all of the videos related to this topic.

Seek out more information about the life and times of Saint Bernard of Clairvaux a brief summary of the life of St. Bernard of Clairvaux The ZDF Enterprises GmbH in Mainz is the company that created Contunico. You may watch all of the videos related to this post. Discover the history of Clairvaux Abbey, as well as the origins of the Cistercian Order. Overview of Clairvaux Abbey in France, including information on the Cistercian order. The ZDF Enterprises GmbH in Mainz is the company that created Contunico.

Early life and career

Learn about the life of Saint Bernard of Clairvaux by reading his letters. A brief summary of the life of St. Bernard of Clairvaux. Contunico is owned by ZDF Enterprises GmbH in Mainz. View all of the videos related to this topic. Discover the history of Clairvaux Abbey, as well as the origins of the Cistercian order. An overview of Clairvaux Abbey in France, as well as a description of the Cistercian order. Contunico is owned by ZDF Enterprises GmbH in Mainz. View all of the videos related to this topic.

Founder and abbot ofClairvaux

His appointment to head a small group of monks to construct a monastery at Clairvaux, on the boundary between Burgundy and Champagne, was made by King Harding in 1115. For more than a decade, the Clairvaux community, which included four brothers, an uncle, two cousins, an architect, and two experienced monks under the direction of Bernard, suffered from acute famine and misery. Meanwhile, as Bernard’s health deteriorated, his spirituality grew more intense and profound. Under the pressure of his ecclesiastical authorities and friends, particularly thebishop and scholarWilliam of Champeaux, he retreated to a cottage near the monastery and placed himself under the supervision of a quack physician.

  • They are distinguished by the employment of parallels, etymologies, alliteration, and biblical symbols, as well as by the recurrence of allusions to the Church Fathers, and they are filled with resonance and lyrical brilliance.
  • While he did not believe in Mary’s Immaculate Conception, Bernard would go on to become one of the most prominent supporters of a moderate worship of the Virgin in the Middle Ages.
  • Bernard struggled and eventually learned to live with the inevitable conflict created by his desire to serve others in charity through obedience and his desire to cultivate his inner life by remaining in his monastic enclosure.
  • His more than 300 letters and sermons document his struggle to reconcile a mystical life of immersion in God with compassion for the poor and a concern for the faithful performance of tasks as a custodian of the life of the church, all while maintaining a strong sense of humor.
  • A sort of higher knowledge that is the complement and fulfilment of faith, and that comes to a close in prayer and contemplation, might be claimed by him as his claim.
  • Stones and trees will teach you things that you will never be able to learn from masters.
  • These ideas were articulated in his sermons “The Steps of Humility” and “The Love of God.”

Our Patron – Saint Bernard of Clairvaux 1090-1153 – St. Bernard of Clairvaux, Scottsdale, AZ

Founder of Clairvaux Abbey in Burgundy, Bernard was one of the most powerful Church leaders in Europe during the first half of the twelfth century. He was also considered to be one of the greatest spiritual masters of all time and the most powerful propagator of the Cistercian reform movement during this period. The abbot of the Abbey of Citeaux was born in Fontaines-les-Dijon in 1090 and entered the monastery in 1112, taking thirty of his family with him, including five of his brothers—his youngest brother and his widowed father followed a short time later.

  • Stephen Harding.
  • A series of sermons on the Annunciation was published by him when he was a young abbot.
  • Thousands of people were drawn to Clairvaux and the other Cistercian monasteries as a result of Bernard’s spiritual writings and great personal charisma, which resulted in the establishment of several additional foundations.
  • His Apologia, one of his most contentious and widely read books, was the result of this experience.
  • The reigning powers of his day sought him out as a consultant and mediator, and he was successful.
  • It took Bernard eight years of arduous travel and deft negotiation to achieve success.
  • When his spiritual son was elected Pope in 1145, his political power grew exponentially.

Upon the orders of Emperor Eugene III, he preached the Second Crusade and dispatched massive forces on their way to Jerusalem. In his latter years, he arose from his sickbed and traveled to the Rhineland to defend Jews from a ruthless persecutory campaign against them.

Doctor of the Church

Founder of Clairvaux Abbey in Burgundy, Bernard was one of the most powerful Church leaders in Europe during the first half of the twelfth century. He was also considered to be one of the greatest spiritual masters of all time and the most powerful propagator of the Cistercian reform movement in Europe. The abbot of the Abbey of Citeaux was born in Fontaines-les-Dijon in 1090 and entered the monastery in 1112, taking thirty members of his family with him, including five of his brothers—his youngest brother and his widowed father arrived later.

  • Stephen Harding gave me my monastic formation, I was ecstatic.
  • A series of sermons on the Annunciation were published by him when he was a young abbot.
  • Thousands of people were drawn to Clairvaux and the other Cistercian monasteries as a result of Bernard’s spiritual writings and great personal charisma, which resulted in the establishment of numerous additional foundations.
  • Apologia, one of his most contentious and widely read books, emerged as a result of this experience.
  • In his day, the reigning authorities sought him out as a consultant and a mediator.
  • Eventually, it took Bernard eight years of arduous travel and deft negotiation to achieve his goal.
  • When his spiritual son was elected Pope in 1145, his power grew even more powerful.
  • After rising from his sickbed and traveling to the Rhineland, he was instrumental in protecting Jews from a ruthless persecution.

Saint Bernard of Clairvaux

Bernard applied for admission to the Cistercian order following the death of his mother in 1547. Three years later, he was assigned to the task of establishing a new abbey in an isolated clearing in a valley known as the Val d’Absinthe, some 15 kilometers southeast of Bar-sur-Aube, where he lived at the time. In accordance with tradition, Bernard built the monastery on June 25, 1115, and named it Claire Vallée, which later became known as Clairvaux. At this location, Bernard would teach a faith that was immediate and in which the Virgin Mary served as an intercessor.

  1. Following the death of Pope Honorius II, Bernard was appointed to decide between competitors for the position of Pope.
  2. Bernard saw the election of one of his followers, Bernard of Pisa (Eugene III), as Pope in 1145.
  3. Bernard proceeded to southern France in June 1145, and his preaching there contributed to the strengthening of anti-heretical sentiment.
  4. It was the failure of the crusaders, for which Bernard bore sole responsibility, that weighed heavily on his mind in the latter years of his life.
  5. This is where Jesus describes how their sins, just as they were with the crusaders and the Hebrew people, in whose favor the Lord had multiplied his prodigies, had been the root of their sorrow and misery.
  6. He was the first Cistercian monk to be included in the calendar of saints, and he was canonized by Pope Alexander III on January 18, 1174, marking the beginning of the Cistercian renaissance.
  7. His bones were originally interred in the Clairvaux Abbey, but after the abbey was closed down by the French revolutionary authorities in 1792, his remains were moved to the Troyes Cathedral.
  8. Bernard’s efforts resulted in the establishment of 163 monasteries in various regions of Europe.
  9. It is common practice among Catholic prayer books to include Saint Bernard’s Prayer to the Shoulder Wound of Jesus in their publications.
  10. According to the evidence, Dante chose Bernard because of his contemplative spirituality, love to Mary, and eloquence, among other characteristics.
  11. Saint Bernard’s feast day is celebrated on August 20 in the Roman Catholic Church, and he is also known for his many letters, treatises, and sermons.

He is the patron saint of the Cistercians, Burgundy, beekeepers and candlemakers, as well as Gibraltar and the Knights Templar. He was born in Clairvaux, France, and died in Speyer, Germany, on December 12, 1215.

St. Bernard of Clairvaux

Bernard applied for admission to the Cistercian order when his mother passed away. Approximately 15 kilometers southeast of Bar-sur-Aube, in a valley known as the Val d’Absinthe, he was tasked with establishing a new abbey. Three years later, he was assigned to this task. As legend has it, Bernard built the monastery on June 25, 1115, and named it Claire Vallée, which later became known as Clairvaux. At this location, Bernard would teach a faith that was immediate, with the Virgin Mary as the intercessor.

  1. The decision to choose Bernard as Pope was made upon the death of Pope Honorius II.
  2. Bernard saw the election of one of his followers, Bernard of Pisa (Eugene III), to the position of Pope in November of 1145.
  3. As a result of his preaching in southern France in June 1145, Bernard was able to increase the amount of people who opposed heresy.
  4. It was the failure of the crusaders, for which Bernard bore sole responsibility, that weighed heavily on his mind throughout the latter years of his life.
  5. This apology is included in the second volume of his “Book on Consideration.” This is where Jesus explains how their sins, just as they were with the crusaders and the Hebrew people, in whose favor the Lord had multiplied his prodigies, had been the source of their sorrow and misery.
  6. Pope Alexander III canonized him on January 18, 1174, making him the first Cistercian monk to be included in the calendar of saints.
  7. Although he was laid to rest in the Clairvaux Abbey, his bones were moved to the Troyes Cathedral in 1792 when the Abbey was closed by the French revolutionary authorities.
  8. Following Bernard’s death, 163 monasteries were established in various locations across the world.
  9. It is common for Catholic prayer books to include Saint Bernard’s Prayer to the Shoulder Wound of Jesus.
  10. As a poet, he is credited with writing the poem “O Sacred Head, Now Wounded,” which is typically seen in English hymnal translations.
  11. Bernard is commemorated on August 20 in the Roman Catholic Church as the author of numerous letters, treatises, and sermons.

He is the patron saint of the Cistercians, Burgundy, beekeepers and candlemakers, as well as Gibraltar and the Knights Templar. He was born in Clairvaux, France, and died at Speyer, Germany, on February 11, 1204.

Further Reading on St. Bernard of Clairvaux

The book St. Bernard of Clairvaux Seen through His Selected Letters, translated with an introduction by Bruno Scott James and published in 1953, paints a vivid portrait of the saint in his many states of mind. Saint Bernard of Clairvaux is the subject of two excellent monographs: Watkin Williams’ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux (1935) and Bruno Scott James’ St. Bernard of Clairvaux: An Essay in Biography (1993). (1957). Geoffrey Webb and Adrian Walker compiled and transcribed accounts of St. Bernard written by his contemporaries, including William of St.

You might be interested:  What Is Edith Stein The Patron Saint Of

Bernard of Clairvaux: His Life and Times (1960).

Additional Biography Sources

‘St. Bernard of Clairvaux Seen through His Selected Letters,’ translated with an introduction by Bruno Scott James and published in 1953, paints a vivid portrait of the saint in his many states of mind. Saint Bernard of Clairvaux is the subject of two excellent monographs: Watkin Williams’ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux (1935) and Bruno Scott James’ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux: An Essay in Biography (1993). (1957). In St. Bernard of Clairvaux, Geoffrey Webb and Adrian Walker collected and translated accounts of St.

Thierry, Arnold of Bonnevaux, Geoffrey and Philip of Clairvaux, and Odo of Deuil (1960).

Saint Bernard of Montjoux – Newman Connection

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  • Centuries:11th Century
  • Patrons:Skiers, Skateboarders, Mountain Climbers, Backpackers, and the Alps
  • Feast Day:May 28th
  • Patron Saints:Skiers, Skateboarders, Mountain Climbers, and the Alps

St. Bernard of Montjoux, also known as St. Bernard of Menthon, was the founder of the venerable Hospice, which provided services to travelers for almost a thousand years until his death. In addition, he was the foundation of the Congregation of the Canons Regular, which has served the Church for the entirety of its existence. It is also the Hospice that is credited with giving origin to the famed breed of dogs known as the St. Bernard, which was named after the Hospice. Bernard was born in 1020, most likely at the Chateau of Menthon, which was a part of the Kingdom of Arles at the time of his birth.

  • After completing his schooling, he made the decision to commit his life to the service of the Church, rejecting an honorable marriage proposal from his father.
  • He was grabbed by Angels and gently lowered to the ground 40 feet below, where he died.
  • Bernard made tremendous progress in his faith under Peter’s leadership, and he was consecrated a priest as a result of his efforts.
  • Bernard was horrified by the fact that the ancient pagan customs were still practiced among the inhabitants of the Alps, and he dedicated his life to converting them.
  • He was said to have performed several miracles.
  • Across the Pennine Alps, there has been a trail from the beginning of recorded history.
  • The typical road across this pass is blanketed in constant snow that is seven to eight feet deep, with drifts of snow piling to heights of more than forty feet at times.

Among Bernard’s responsibilities in his role as Archdeacon were the care of the needy and the transportation of travelers.

His name has now been given to this website.

Bernard Pass, a mountain saddle in the Graian Alps at an elevation of 7, 076 feet above sea level, within a few years of the first.

In honor of St.

St.

Lawrence, where he had been since his conversion.

Bernard Passes, which were named in honor of the founder of these humanitarian institutions, St.

Every season of the year, but notably during strong snow storms, the Canons might be found accompanied by their well-trained dogs, St.

In pursuit of victims who had succumbed to the harshness of the weather or who required aid, they would travel out into the wilderness.

They were reliant on donations and collects to ensure their survival.

As of 2012, the Congregation has approximately 35 professed members.

Bernard dogs are still kept as pets on the premises, and helicopters are employed in rescue missions.

Bernard until 1681, despite the fact that he had been worshipped since the 12thcentury.

Bernard as the patron saint of the Alps.

Bernard of Montjoux, also known as St.

In addition, he was the foundation of the Congregation of the Canons Regular, which has served the Church for the entirety of its existence.

Bernard, which was named after the Hospice.

He constructed two Hospices to provide food, clothes, and a warm refuge for anyone passing over two of the Alps’ highest passes.

Bernard Pass and the Little St.

Bernard Pass. To hunt for and rescue tired travelers, he and his Order relied on St. Bernard dogs, which they employed to transport them back to the Hospices. Since the 11th century, these dogs have been employed as “rescue” dogs, and they are still in use today, having been named in his honor.

Saint Bernard of Clairvaux

In the ninth century, St. Bernard of Montjoux, also known as St. Bernard of Menthon, was the founder of the renowned Hospice, which provided services to travelers for more than 1,000 years. In addition, he was the foundation of the Congregation of the Canons Regular, which has served the Church for the entirety of its existence. Furthermore, it is the Hospice that is credited with giving birth to the famous breed of dogs known as the St. Bernard, which was named after the Hospice. Born about 1020, Bernard was almost certainly raised at the Chateau of Menthon, which was then a part of the Kingdom of Arles.

  • In addition to being the descendant of a wealthy and noble family, he also had a thorough educational background.
  • He is said to have fled from his castle the night before his scheduled marriage and committed himself by jumping from a higher window, according to popular belief.
  • The Archdeacon of Aosta appointed him as his director, and he placed himself under his direction.
  • In recognition of his study and heroic virtue, he was nominated to succeed his master as Archdeacon of the Cathedral, with responsibilities that included overseeing the administration of the Diocese and working directly under the Bishop.
  • His Gospel ministry to these people and many other locations lasted for another 42 years, resulting in a large number of conversions during that time.
  • Bernard’s name, on the other hand, will be famous throughout history for another reason.
  • From the Aosta Valley to the Swiss Canton of Valais, this road connects the two countries.

Avalanche risk made this crossing particularly hazardous in the spring, when avalanches were a constant concern, and pilgrims from France and Germany traveling to Rome frequently utilized it.

8,000 feet above sea level, at the summit of the pass, Bernard established a Canonry and Hospice in the year 1050 for the sake of the locals’ comfort and protection.

His second Hospice was built atop the Little St.

In the course of a journey to Rome, Bernard received sanction from the Pope for the transfer of both of these objects to the care of the Canons Regular community.

Nicholas of Myra, who is known as the Patron Saint of Travelers, the new village was established.

Bernard passed away on June 10, 1081, he was buried in the monastery of St.

They were well-known for the gracious hospitality they gave to all visitors passing through the Great and Little St.

The Canons were followed by their well-trained dogs, who were the usual herding dogs of Valais, St.

In pursuit of victims who had succumbed to the harshness of the weather or who need aid, they would set out into the wilderness.

In order to survive, they relied on donations and collections.

As of 2012, the Congregation has approximately 35 professed members.

Bernard dogs are still kept as pets on the premises, and helicopters are employed for rescue missions.

Bernard until 1681, despite the fact that he had been worshipped since the 12th century.

Bernard to be the patron saint of Italy’s Alps.

Bernard of Montjoux, also known as St.

In addition, he was the foundation of the Congregation of the Canons Regular, which has served the Church for the entirety of its existence.

Bernard, which was named after the Hospice.

His two Hospices, located over two of the Alps’ highest passes, served as a source of food, clothes, and a warm haven for those in need.

Bernard Pass and the Little St.

Bernard River. To hunt for and rescue tired travelers, he and his Order relied on St. Bernard dogs, which they then returned to the Hospices. This kind of dog has been employed for “rescue” work since the 11th century, and it is called in his honor.

Saint Bernard of Clairvaux – Feast Day – August 20

Clairvaux Abbey is located in the town of Clairvaux in the French region of Champagne. Saint Bernard of Clairvaux was born around 1090 in Fontaine-les-Dijon in Burgundy and died on August 20, 1153 at Clairvaux Abbey in Clairvaux, Champagne, France, at the age of 63. Every year, on August 20, the Catholic Church commemorates his death and resurrection.

Saint Bernard of Clairvaux Biography
Saint Bernard of Clairvaux
Date of Birth 1090 AD
Place of Birth Fontaine-les-Dijon, Burgundy, France
Profession Abbot Confessor, Doctor of the Church
Place of Work France
Date of Death August 20 1153 (aged 63)
Place of Death Clairvaux Abbey, Clairvaux, Champagne, France
Feast Day August 20
Canonization By Pope Alexander III on January 18 1174 in Rome
Patron Saint of
  • Cistercians
  • Speyer Cathedral
  • Queens’ College, Cambridge
  • Knights Templar
  • Gibraltar
  • Candlemakers
  • Burgundy
  • Binangonan, Rizal
  • Beekeepers
  • Algeciras
  • Cistercians

Saint Bernard of Clairvaux Life History

He was born to Tescelin de Fontaine and Alèthe de Montbard, both of whom were named after Saint Bernard of Clairvaux. His father was the lord of Fontaine-lès-Dijon, which is where he was born. His parents were descended from noble families in the Burgundy region. Bernard was the youngest of six children, with five brothers and one sister. When he was nine years old, he enrolled in a Catholic elementary school in Châtillon-sur-Seine that was run by the Church. He had a strong interest in literature, eloquence, and the devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary, among other things.

  1. As a result of his mother’s death when he was 18 years old, Bernard began thinking about entering the Cîteaux Abbey near Dijon.
  2. Following his three-year tenure at Cîteaux Abbey, Bernard and twelve other monks were assigned to Vallée d’Absinthe in the Langres Diocese in order to establish a new monastery.
  3. During this period, Bernard was elevated to the rank of abbot by the Bishop of Châlons-sur-Marne, William of Champeaux, and a budding friendship developed between the two men.
  4. The Clairvaux Abbey began establishing other abbeys, such as the Trois-Fontaines Abbey, Fontenay Abbey, and Foigny Abbey, all of which are located near Vervins.
  5. It was at Cîteaux, France, that the Cistercian Order was formed in 1098 by a group of Benedictine monks who intended to establish a monastic life that included the rejection of feudal revenues, the assignment of monks to physical labor, and extreme austerity.
  6. They were usually critical of them, but a smart apology from St Bernard put an end to the debate.
  7. He wrote a rule for the Knights Templar that became a model of Christian nobility for the rest of the world.

Bernard assisted in the mediating of a split between two competing popes, Pope Innocent II and Antipope Anacletus II, and the result was a decision that Pope Innocent II would be appointed as the leader of the Catholic Church.

He attempted to persuade Abelard to cease his publications, but Abelard refused.

Despite this, St Bernard was instrumental in putting an end to the heresy preached by Henry of Lausanne (his followers were known as Henricians).

St Bernard was responsible for putting these heresies out of business.

In this first crusade, St Bernard was victorious, but he was unsuccessful in the second because, as he put it, “the sins of the crusaders were the source of their sorrow and failure in the second crusade.” St Bernard was instrumental in the establishment of 163 monasteries around Europe.

He expressed regret that monasticism suffered as a result of the abandonment of Lectio Divina, and he observed that those who serve as their own spiritual directors have idiots for followers.

It is said that St Bernard had a strong devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary. He wrote and lectured about Mary as our intercessor on a number of occasions.

Saint Bernard of Clairvaux Death

At the age of 63, Saint Bernard of Clairvaux died on August 20, 1153 at Clairvaux, France. His bones were originally interred in Clairvaux Abbey, but after the French revolutionary authorities dismantled the abbey in 1792, they were moved to the Troyes Cathedral.

Doctor of the Church

St Bernard was elevated to the rank of Doctor of the Church in 1830.

Saint Bernard of Clairvaux Feast Day

Every year on August 20, the Catholic Church commemorates St Bernard’s death and resurrection.

Canonization

Every year on August 20, the Catholic Church commemorates St Bernard’s life and work.

Saint Bernard of Clairvaux is the Patron Saint Of

  • Cistercians
  • Speyer Cathedral
  • Queens’ College, Cambridge
  • Knights Templar
  • Gibraltar
  • Candlemakers
  • Burgundy
  • Binangonan, Rizal
  • Beekeepers
  • Algeciras
  • Cistercians

Hymns and writings

St Bernard of Clairvaux has composed a number of hymns, poetry, and novels, including the following:

Hymns

  • O Sacred Head, You Have Been Wounded
  • The joy of Loving Hearts, Jesus, is yours. Jesus, even the very thought of Thee is a blessing.

Works

  • Holy Head, You Have Been Wound
  • The joy of Loving Hearts, Jesus, be with us always. Jesus, even the very thought of Thee is a miracle.

Today’s Catholic Quote:

St Bernard placed a strong emphasis on the need of Lectio Divina and contemplation for monks in his writings. He expressed regret that monasticism suffered as a result of the abandonment of Lectio Divina, and he observed that those who serve as their own spiritual directors have idiots for followers. According to St. Bernard, he addressed individuals who requested for admittance to the monastery with the words, “If you choose to enter here, leave at the threshold your body that you have brought with you from the world; here there is only place for your spirit.” Let us continuously ask ourselves the question that St.

Home

To the monks, Lectio Divina and contemplation were extremely important, according to St Bernard. He expressed regret that monasticism suffered as a result of the abandonment of Lectio Divina, and he observed that those who serve as their own spiritual directors have idiots as followers. “If you wish to enter here, leave at the threshold the body that you have brought with you from the world; here there is only place for your spirit,” St. Bernard advised people who petitioned for admittance to the monastery.

Bernard asked himself every day, “To what goal have you come here?” let us ask ourselves this question continuously.

A Patron Saint for Mountain Climbers- The Arlington Catholic Herald

St. Bernard of Menthon (St. Bernard of Menthon) (c.1000-c.1081) The feast day is on May 28th. John Paul II was not the only pope who participated in sports. Achille Ratti, the future Pope Pius XI, had been a lifetime mountain climber before becoming Pope in 1922. Cardinal Ratti was forced to give up his favorite sport after being elected to the papacy, but he was able to do something to promote it while serving as pope. Pius XI designated St. Bernard of Menthon as the patron saint of mountaineers in 1923.

  1. Bernard has also been designated as the patron saint of rock climbing, which is a prominent contemporary activity.
  2. According to all probability, this is the location where St.
  3. The tutor for Bernard was engaged by his parents, Richard and Bernoline, when he was a little kid.
  4. Bernard was taught to read and write by Germain, who also nurtured the boy’s religious commitment and took him on mountain rambles with his family.
  5. As a teenager, according to one version of Bernard’s account, his parents sent him to Paris so that he might complete his studies.
  6. When Bernard arrived home, their plans came crashing down.
  7. Bernard said his parents farewell, left the castle, and moved in with Peter, the archdeacon of Aosta, who was his godfather.

Despite the fact that the Diocese of Aosta expanded into the Alps, Catholicism had had a limited influence on the mountain inhabitants of the region.

Bernard’s parish was established after his ordination in these outlying areas.

While on these missionary journeys, Bernard was exposed to the risks of alpine trekking for the first time.

At order to assist these travelers, he established a monastery and hospice in what is now known as Great St.

Bernard built a second monastery at the top of the Little St.

It was the monks who manned these residences, who were aided by huge dogs that became known as St.

According to legend, Bernard’s mother and father were among the travelers who sought refuge at the abbey.

Bernard continues.

Bernard Pass is still staffed by monks, who welcome throngs of visitors, mountaineers, and hikers in the summer and a few intrepid pilgrims, climbers, and skiers in the winter to their facility.

Bernard dogs that are kept as pets, and helicopters are still utilized in rescue missions today.

(Our Sunday Visitor, 2004). The Arlington Catholic Herald has copyright protection for the year 2005. All intellectual property rights are retained. Arlington Catholic Herald (Arlington, VA) 2005

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: St. Bernard of Menthon

Menthon, or St. Bernard of Menthon, is a saint who lived in the ninth century (c.1000-c.1081) May 28th is a feast day. There were been athletic popes before John Paul II. Ratti, who rose to become Pope Pius XI in 1922, had long been a mountain climber’s enthusiast. Cardinal Ratti had to give up his favorite sport after being elected to the papacy, but he was able to do something to promote it while serving as pope. Mountaineers were given patronage by Pope Pius XI in 1923, when he designated St.

  1. Saint Bernard has also been designated as the patron saint of rock climbing, which is a prominent modern activity.
  2. St.
  3. His parents, Richard and Bernoline, enlisted the help of a man named Germain to educate their son, Bernard, when he was a little lad.
  4. He also fostered his religious zeal and took him on mountain hikes.
  5. The tale goes that Bernard’s parents sent him to Paris to pursue his schooling when he was still a teenager.
  6. Once Bernard arrived home, their plans came crashing down.
  7. Bernard said his parents farewell, left the castle, and moved in with Peter, the archdeacon of Aosta, who had become his mentor.

Catholicism’s influence on mountain people has been limited despite the fact that the Aosta Diocese reached into the Alps.

Following his ordination, Bernard’s parish included these outlying areas.

These missionary journeys exposed Bernard to the risks of mountain travel, which he learned about firsthand.

The monastery and hospice he established at what is now known as Great St.

The monastery at the Little St.

It was the monks who manned these houses, who were aided by huge dogs who became known as St.

At accordance with legend, Bernard’s mother and father were among the pilgrims who took refuge in the abbey.

Bernard continues.

Bernard Pass is still staffed by monks, who welcome throngs of visitors, mountaineers, and hikers in the summer and a few intrepid pilgrims, climbers, and skiers in the winter to the monastery.

Bernard dogs that are kept as pets, and helicopters are still employed in rescue missions today, as well.

(Our Sunday Visitor, 2004). The Arlington Catholic Herald retains copyright protection for the period 2005-2006. All intellectual property rights are protected by law. In 2005, the Arlington Catholic Herald published an article titled

Sources

Vl, 358; DORSAZ, Vie d. S. Bernard de Menthon (Paris, 1862); BUTLER, Lives of the Saints, VI, 577; Miscella Storica Italica (1894) xxxi, 341 sqq. ; ALDEGUIER, Vie de St. Bernard, Apotre des Alpes (Paris, 1894); Miscella Storica Italica (1894) xxxi, 341 (Toulouse, 1858).

About this page

Citation in the APA style (1907). St. Bernard of Menthon is a saint who lived in the fifth century. It may be found in the Catholic Encyclopedia. The Robert Appleton Company is based in New York. citation. Barnabas Dieringer was born in the town of Dieringer in the town of Dieringer in the town of Dieringer in the town of Dieringer in the town of Dieringer in the town of Dieringer in the town of Dieringer in the town of Dieringer in the town of Dieringer in the town of Dieringer in the town of Dieringer in the town of Dieringer in the town of Dieringer in the town of Dieringer in the town of Dieringer “St.

  1. Bernard of Menthon,” as the name suggests.
  2. The Robert Appleton Company published this book in New York in 1907.
  3. It was transcribed for New Advent by Joseph E.
  4. Approval from the ecclesiastical authorities Nihil Obstat.1907 is a Latin phrase that means “there is no obstacle.” Imprimatur.+Archbishop John M.
  5. Information about how to get in touch with us.
  6. Email is webmasteratnewadvent.org, and I may be reached @ that address.

St. Bernard de Clairvaux

In honor of St. Bernard of Clairvaux, the Church commemorates his feast day on August 20. He is known as a Doctor of the Church for his writings and sermons that had a significant impact on Europe during the 12th century, as well as his numerous efforts that prevented a schism in the Church from occurring in 1130. Bernard was born around 1090 in the vicinity of Dijon, France, and spent his early years there before departing to join the Cistercians at the age of 22. He had a good education and was so enthusiastic about his beliefs that he was able to persuade his siblings, his uncle, and many of his acquaintances to accompany him to the monastery.

  • Clairvaux was the name given to the monastery by the French (Valley of Light).
  • Pope Benedict XVI recognized St.
  • The saint’s rigorous devotion of quiet and contemplation, on the other hand, did not prevent him from engaging in a very strenuous missionary activity.
  • A second point raised by Pope Francis was the saint’s emphasis on the reality that God, who is love, created humans out of love and that man’s redemption is found in sticking firmly to Divine love, which has been revealed through the crucified and resurrected Christ.
  • Bernard’s teaching and his theology was not in seeking new routes, but rather in managing to offer the truth of the faith in a clear and incisive fashion, so that it fascinates the listener and leads him or her to prayer.” St.
  • He became well-known throughout Europe and was sought out for advice by Popes and other political leaders, among others.
  • During his weekly general audience in August 2008, Pope Benedict XVI made a reference to the saint.

“He was also honored as a Doctor of Mariology, not because he wrote substantially about Our Lady, but because he grasped her fundamental role in the Church, presenting her as the perfect model of the monastic life and of every other form of the Christian life,” said Pope Benedict XVI in his tribute.

Patron saint of hikers: St. Bernard’s Catholic Church celebrates 11th-century namesake

In honor of St. Bernard of Clairvaux, who was named a Doctor of the Church in recognition of his writings and sermons that had a significant impact on Europe during the 12th century, as well as his numerous efforts that prevented a schism in the Church in 1130, the Church commemorates his feast day on August 20th. Bernhard was born around 1090 in the vicinity of Dijon, France, and spent his early years there until deciding to leave and join the Cistercians when he was 22-years-old. He had a good education and was so enthusiastic about his religion that he was able to persuade his siblings, his uncle, and many of his acquaintances to accompany him to the monastery in the first place.

  1. Clairvaux is the name given to the monastery (Valley of Light).
  2. In 2006, Pope Benedict XVI remarked on St.
  3. In spite of this, the saint’s adherence to a stringent regimen of solitude and contemplation did not prevent him from engaging in an extremely active apostolic ministry.
  4. Additionally, the Pope emphasized the saint’s emphasis on the reality that God, who is love, created humans out of love, and that man’s redemption is found in firmly adhering to Divine love, as manifested in the crucified and resurrected Christ.
  5. Bernard’s preaching and his theology was not in seeking new routes, but rather in managing to offer the truth of the faith in a clear and incisive fashion, so as to interest the listener and draw the person to prayer.” Besides his Marian devotion, St.
  6. He became well-known throughout Europe and was sought out for advice by Popes and other political leaders, among other things.
  7. During his weekly general audience in August 2008, Pope Benedict XVI mentioned the saint.

“He was also regarded as a Doctor of Mariology, not because he wrote substantially about Our Lady, but because he understood her fundamental role in the Church, presenting her as the perfect model of the monastic life and of every other form of the Christian life,” said Pope Benedict XVI further.

Saint Bernard of Clairvaux

Also referred to as

  • Doctor of the Church
  • The last of the Fathers of the Holy Church
  • A mellifluous figure.

Profile Brother of Saint Humeline, he was born into the French nobility. Upon reaching the age of 22, he and four of his brothers, together with 25 other companions, entered theabbeyofCiteaux; his father and another brother followed shortly after. He died at the age of 23. Benedictine. Clement of Clairvaux founded and led the monastery, which grew to include over 700 monks and eventually 160 daughter houses. The Cistercians were reformed and revised. KingLouis the Fat and KingLouis the Young both had advisors and admonishers in the person of KingLouis the Fat.

  • FoughtAlbigensianism.
  • Preaching throughout France, Italy, and Germany.
  • SaintMalachy O’More’s friend and biographer, based in Dublin.
  • The first Cistercian monk to be commemorated on the calendar of saints.

Pope Pius VIII has designated him as a Doctor of the Church. Every morning, Bernard would ask himself, “Why have I come here?” and then remind himself of his primary responsibility, which was to live a holy life in the company of others. Born

  • At Clairvaux Abbey, Ville-sous-la-Ferté, in the Aube region of France, on August 20, 1153
  • At Clairvaux Abbey, Ville-sous-la-Ferté, Aube, France, on the 20th of August in the year 1503.

At Clairvaux Abbey, Ville-sous-la-Ferté, Aube, France, on the 20th of August, 1153.

  • A beehive, bees, a book, a Cistercian having a vision of Mary, a Cistercian with a beehive, a Cistercian with a chained devil, a Cistercian with an amitre on the ground beside him, a Cistercian with a white dog, a Cistercian writing and watching, and a Cistercian with a white dog Mary
  • The instruments of the Passion
  • A pen
  • A whitedog
  • And SaintHumbeline are all present.

A beehive, bees, a book, a Cistercian having a vision of Mary, a Cistercian with a beehive, a Cistercian with a chaineddemon, a Cistercian with an amitre on the ground beside him, a Cistercian with a white dog, a Cistercian writing and watching, and a Cistercian with a white dog Marian instruments of the Passion: a pen, a dog, and Saint Humeline are all present.

  • A Garner of Saints, written by Allen Banks Hinds, M.A., and a Book of Saints, written by Father Lawrence, are two excellent resources. The Rev. Dr. George Lovasik, S.V.D. The Book of Saints, written by the Monks of Ramsgate
  • The Catholic Encyclopedia, written by M Gildas
  • Doctor Mellifluus, written by Pope Pius XII
  • The Encyclopedia Britannica
  • The Golden Legend
  • And many more works. The Lives of the Great Saints in Brief
  • FatherAlban Butler’s Lives of the Saints
  • FatherFrancis Xavier Weninger’s Lives of the Saints
  • FatherAlban Butler’s Lives of the Saints
  • FatherFrancis Xavier Weninger’s Lives of the Saints Memorare
  • Miniature Lives of the Saints for Every Day of the Year, by Father Henry Sebastian Bowden
  • New Catholic Dictionary
  • Miniature Lives of the Saints for Every Day of the Year
  • John Dawson’s Pictorial Lives of the Saints is a work of art. Gilmary Shea is a woman who lives in the United States. The General Audience of Pope Benedict XVI was held on October 21, 2009. Breviary of the Romans
  • Saint Bernard and Saint Francis: A Contrast, by John Keating Cartwright, D.D
  • Saints and Saintly Dominicans, by Blessed Hyacinthe-Marie Cormier, O.P
  • Short Lives of the Saints, by Eleanor Cecilia Donnelly
  • BySaintBernard of Clairvaux, O.P
  • Saints and Saintly Dominicans, by Blessed Hyacinthe-Marie Cormier, O.
  • Among the works on saints are A Garner of Saints by Allen Banks Hinds, M.A. and A Book of Saints by Father Lawrence (both available from Amazon). Surgeon-Veteran-Doctor George Lovasik Books such as the Book of Saints, by the Ramsgate Monks, the Catholic Encyclopedia, edited by M. Gildas, Doctor Mellifluus, edited by Pope Pius XII, the Encyclopedia Britannica, and the Golden Legend are all available online. Petite biographies of the great saints Among the saints’ biographies are those by FatherAlban Butler and FatherFrancis Xavier Weninger, as well as those by FatherAlban Butler and FatherFrancis Xavier Weninger, as well as those by FatherAlban Butler. Memorare
  • Father Henry Sebastian Bowden’s Miniature Lives of the Saints for Every Day of the Year
  • The New Catholic Dictionary
  • And other resources. Pictures of the Saints by John Dawson is a book of illustrations of the saints. Gillian Shea is a writer who lives in New York City. During his General Audience on October 21, 2009, Pope Benedict XVI said the following: Breviary of the Romans By John Keating Cartwright, D.D.
  • Saints and Saintly Dominicans, by Blessed Hyacinthe-Marie Cormier, O.P
  • Short Lives of the Saints, by Eleanor Cecilia Donnelly
  • BySaintBernard of Clairvaux, O.P
  • Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, O.P
  • Read online
  • Download the EPub
  • Listen to the Librivox Audio Book
  • And more.
  • Listen to the Librivox Audio Book or read online
  • Or download the EPub.
  • Doctrine and Doctrine of the Church26, by Dr Matthew Bunson
  • Saint Bernard’s “On Loving God,” on loving God

All praise to God for Saint Bernard the Wonder-Worker audio books. Saint Bernard, Abbot of Clairvaux, wrote a number of letters.

  • Playlist on YouTube
  • Saint Bernard the Wonder Worker (audiobook)
  • Saint Bernard the Wonder Worker (audiobook).
  • Saint Bernard’s writings on the love of God and the Song of Songs
  • Saint Bernard’s writings on the love of God and the Song of Songs
  • Saint Bernard’s Discourse on Grace and Free Will
  • Saint Bernard’s On Consideration (On Consideration) Saint Bernard’s “Twelve Degrees of Humility and Pride” (The Twelve Degrees of Humility and Pride)
  • Saint Bernard’s reflections on Advent and Christmas
  • In addition, there is Richard Salter Storrs’ Bernard of Claivaux: The Times, The Man and His Work, which is a biography of the French nobleman Bernard of Claivaux. by Dr. Augustus Neader, entitled The Life and Times of Saint Bernard
  • St. Bernard’s Life and Times, a book written by James Cotter Morison
  • By Father Theodore Ratisbonne, The Life and Times of Saint Bernard is a biography of the saint. by Father John Mabillon
  • The Life and Works of Saint Bernard, Volume 1
  • Father John Mabillon’s Life and Works of Saint Bernard, second edition
  • Samuel John Eales’ Saint Bernard, Abbot of Clairvaux is a work of art. Some of Saint Bernard’s letters to the Abbot of Clairvaux
  • Enciclopedia Catolica
  • Martirologio Romano, 2001edición
  • Enciclopedia Catolica
  • Abbé Christian-Philippe Chanut
  • Agnès Richomme
  • Auteurs Anciens
  • Benoît XVI, Audience Générale, 21 October 2009
  • Bollandistes
  • Dictionnaire historique de la Suisse
  • Abbé Christian-Philippe Chanut
  • The Feast of the Prefixes
  • Saint Bernard’s Complete Works of Art
  • Wikipedia
  • A dictionary of Swiss history
  • Cathopedia
  • Dizionario historico della Svizzera
  • San Bernardo di Chiaravalle, L’ultimo padre del Medio evo
  • San Bernardo di Chiaravalle e I normanni
  • Santi e Beati
  • Santo del Giorno
  • Sermoni di Sann Bernardo
  • Wikipedia
  • Marco Binetti
  • Popa Pio XII: Doctor Mellifluus
  • San Bernardo di Chiaravalle, L’ultimo padre del Medio evo
  • San Bernardo di Chiar

Readings When you are in danger, when you have uncertainties, when you are in problems, think of Mary and call on Mary. Never allow her name to be taken from your lips, and never allow it to be taken from your heart. And, in order to benefit from her prayers, you should refrain from following in her footsteps. You will never be lost if you have her as a guide; you will never be discouraged if you invoke her; as long as she is in your thoughts, you will be safe from deception; while she holds your hand, you will not fall; under her protection, you will have nothing to fear; if she walks ahead of you, you will not become weary; if she shows you favor, you will reach your destination.

Love is adequate in and of itself; it provides pleasure both independently and as a result of itself.

When it comes to love, there is no cause outside of itself, and there is no consequence outside of itself.

Even if it is unequal in comparison to the Creator’s love for the creature, love is the only one of all the motions, sensations, and feelings experienced by the soul that allows for a response to the Creator and some form of equivalent return.

Having only one goal in life is for others to love him, secure in the knowledge that those who love him will be made happy as a result of their affection for him.

–SaintBernard Take a look at that cunning calumniator!

His voice is choked with emotions as he attempts to gloss over the defamation that has been on the tip of his tongue for some time.

He expresses his displeasure at discovering that our brother has fallen into such a vice; you are all aware of how much he means to me and how many times I have attempted to rectify him.

If I tried to hide the truth from you, it would be pointless; it is all too real, and I tell you this with tears in my eyes.

Even while this poor unhappy brother possesses much ability, it must be acknowledged that he is also extremely culpable, and no matter how warm our feelings for him, it is impossible to pardon him. The 24th sermon on the Canticles of Saint Bernard of Clairvaux is cited in the MLA.

  • “St. Bernard of Clairvaux” is a saint who lived in Clairvaux, France. CatholicSaints. Information will be available on December 6, 2021. 5th of January, 2022
  • Web.

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