How To Make A Saint Costume At Home

Contents

How to Make a Saint Costume

  • 2 to 3 yards of brown or black fabric
  • Scissors
  • Brown and black thread
  • Sewing needle
  • 5 to 6 feet of rope
  • Measuring tape or ruler
  • 2 to 3 yards of brown or black fabric

Many saints were friars, and creating a costume in the style of one of them is straightforward. When it comes to entering a costume contest at church or school, saints are popular individuals to copy, both in real life and in a humorous manner. Saint costumes may be as diverse as the saints themselves, with saints ranging from priests, monks, and popes to friars, nuns, and bishops among those who have donned them over the centuries. There are many different saint costumes that may be made with a few inexpensive materials and some imagination.

Step 1

Place a wall in front of your youngster (or whoever will be wearing the costume) and instruct him to stand with his arms spread and feet together. Measure the person’s wingspan (from the fingertip of the left outstretched hand to the fingertip of the right, outstretched hand) and height (from the chin to the ankle) with a measuring tape or a ruler, as appropriate. Increase the measurement from the chin to the ankle by two. Measure the individual from the armpit to the tip of the index finger and from the armpit to the ankle.

Make a list of all of the figures.

Step 2

Prepare the brown or black cloth by laying it flat on the floor and cutting its width to the wingspan measurement you obtained, as well as its length to the doubled chin to ankle measurement you recorded. Fold the cloth in half lengthwise to make a square.

Step 3

Beginning at the bottom of the folded cloth and working your way up, measure the distance from the person’s armpit to their ankle. Then, connecting the two spots with a curved arch is drawn. Draw a straight line from the end point of your initial measurement to the left edge of the cloth (the distance should be the same as the distance between the person’s armpit and fingertip measurement you made). Then repeat the process on the right side of the cloth, and once all of the lines have been made, cut the fabric.

Step 4

Create a neck hole for the costume by drawing a half circle in the upper middle of the remaining cloth and cutting along the drawn line.

Step 5

Sew the two pieces of cloth where you made the cuts together using a sewing needle and brown or black thread using a brown or black thread. Take the fabric pieces from the right side that were saved and arrange them so that the straight edges are facing left and down. To make a hood, stitch the curved right and bottom sides together at the neckline.

Step 6

Closing the hood by sewing the bottom border to the costume’s neck hole with a sewing needle and thread is simple and fun!

As soon as the guy is dressed in his friar costume, wrap the rope around his waist to complete the look.

Simple Costume Ideas for All Saints Day

You are here: Home/Being Catholic/All Saints’ Day Costume Ideas that are Simple and Easy to Make This is a time of year that my children absolutely adore. Prepare for Halloween festivities as well as All Saints Day celebrations, which are both coming up soon. We’ll be attending Halloween parties and gatherings in our community, but my children are equally enthused about dressing up as their favorite saints and sharing tales with their peers. As a craft-challenged mom, you may be thinking to yourself, “There is no way I could make ANOTHER costume!” I understand your frustration.

I’ve got you covered, thanks to the assistance (and lightning-fast delivery) of Amazon.

Simple Costumes for All Saints Day

Angels With these adorable angel costumes, it would be simple to impersonate Saint Gabriel, Saint Raphael, or even Saint Michael. Nuns Many of our favourite saints were nuns, which makes a simple nun outfit a perfect spot to begin your journey. Suggestions for nun outfits include: St. Faustina (St. Faustina) St. Scholastica is a saint who lived in the fourth century. St. Rita is a Catholic saint. If you can locate a brown nun’s garb, you might dress up as St Clare, St Therese of Liseux, or St Therese of Avila, depending on your preferences.

  • To begin, purchase an apriestor amonk suit and then add on the accessories.
  • This brown monk’s robe may be turned into the likes of St Francis of Assisi, St Anthony, or St Padre Pio, depending on your preference.
  • These are great for regular play as well as for celebrations such as All Saints’ Day.
  • Royalty When your daughters learn that there are several saints who were princesses and queens, they’ll be over the moon with excitement.
  • Saints who were princesses or queens include St Elizabeth of Hungary, St Margaret of Scotland, and St Brigid of Ireland, among others.
  • Never be concerned.
  • Those who are indigenous to the land Personally, I think dressing up as St Katerisounds like a lot of fun — and this outfit makes it simple to do!

This outfit would be perfect for the feast of St Martin of Tours.

Do you want to dress up like an apostle or a saint from the early Christian era?

This Mary costume is a beautiful way to honor Our Lady.

Other Saint-related Suggestions One of my favorite saints is St Thomas More, who happens to be one of my favorites.

Do you have a youngster who wants to be a doctor one day?

What kind of outfit will you be dressing up your Catholic youngsters in?

Halloween Candy Bark is a type of candy that is available in a variety of flavors.

Halloween Costumes That Are Simple to Make Halloween Treats That Aren’t Full of Candy Crafts for Children to Make for Halloween Halloween Movies and Television Shows for the Whole Family Ideas for All Saints Day Costumes

All Saints’ Day Costume Ideas for Boys

Coming up with ideas for All Saints Day costumes should be enjoyable rather than stressful! It is important not to let your children miss the All Saints Day celebration because you are unable to come up with appropriate outfits. It is not necessary to know how to sew in order to pull it off. This post has more than 60 ideas for boy saint costumes. Have fun! All of my All Saints’ Day materials for children may be found right here. Also, please have a look at my All Saints’ Day food labels, which are really fantastic!

  1. – For the most part, saint costumes are going to begin with a simple robe.
  2. You may also dress in solid colors and then safety pin a sheet around your waist to protect yourself.
  3. Tie a rope around their center to keep them from falling out.
  4. A beard may be added to a variety of boy outfits.

Saints Who Wore Armor

Around Halloween season, you may readily get plastic armor in stores, or you can construct your own from scratch. Simply construct your armor from cardboard, secure it with duct tape, then cover it with aluminum foil. I really like the concept of creating helmet protection by wrapping a bike helmet with aluminum foil. The following are some excellent guides for building cardboard swords, paint stick swords, and pizza pan shields, as well as a paper mache cross shield.

  • St. George is known as the dragon-slaying saint. Superhero-like in appearance. If you wish to wear armor but not wings or a crown, this is the person for you
  • Otherwise, look elsewhere. St. Michael the Archangel is the patron saint of firefighters. Put on armor, wield a sword, and you’ll need some wings and sandals to complete your look. St. Longinus is a Roman soldier who has a spear in his hand. An excellent instruction on how to construct a cardboard Roman soldier helmet is available here. Also, see the section on “Royal Saints” farther down the page.

Archangels– I believe St. Michael is one of the most popular All Saints’ Day costumes I’ve seen, and it’s hard to argue with that. He’s fantastic!

  • St. Michael — See “Saints Who Wear Armor” above for further information. Carry a horn in the case of St. Gabriel, and a fish in the case of St. Raphael.

Royal Saints

Many of the monarchs are also capable of donning armor and wielding a sword. Of course, monarchs are also adorned with crowns. There are several royal saints to select from, including:

  • St. Edward the Confessor, the son of King Ethelred III, and St. Henry, the King of Burgundy are two of the most famous saints in history. Wear a red cape and crown, and carry a sword
  • St. David – Prince of Wales
  • St. Wenceslaus – Red cape, armor, and crown- this guy has it all
  • St. George – Prince of Denmark
  • St. King of Denmark, St. Canute, St. Ferdinand III of Castile, and King of Hungary, St. Stephen, St. Louis IX, and St. Stephen are all depicted with scepters
  • St. Louis IX carries a scepter
  • St. Canute, St. Ferdinand III of Castile, and St. Stephen, King of Hungary

Saints In Brown Robes

These outfits begin with a brown (ideally hooded) robe, a rope tied around the waist, and shoes to complete the look of the character. All of the Saints who were Franciscans will be dressed in a similar manner, however they may have various props.

  • St. Francis of Assisi is a Franciscan saint who wears brown robes. Instructions on how to make a St. Francis hairpiece may be found here. Safety Pin some plush animals around your robe or a bird on your shoulder to make it more interesting. St. Anthony was a Franciscan as well. To honor the patron saint of lost objects, tape often misplaced items (such as keys and television remotes) around the hem of your robe. Because Jesus is frequently depicted bearing the Christ child, you may substitute a baby doll or a younger sibling in his place. At St. Francis, he keeps his tonsure haircut the same as before. Carry a crutch and a book in the case of St. Anthony the Abbot
  • In the case of St. Rocco, carry a plush dog. During the celebration of St. Pascal Baylon, carry a chalice and a host carved out of card stock. St. Benedict – Attach a stuffed raven to your outfit for St. Benedict
  • St. Padre Pio — Dress in a brown robe with a cross around your neck, grow a beard, and don’t forget to bring your stigmata rags along with you! The ones seen below were created with masking tape and a red marker. Additionally, we’ve fashioned them out of white fabric and red food coloring.

A priest costume may be put together quickly and easily with just a pair of black leggings and a black turtleneck. A white sheet of paper (or a square of masking tape) should be taped to the collar to indicate that the wearer has been elevated to the priesthood. The brightly colored robes that priests wear on top would be an optional addition to a priest outfit. Make priest vestments out of sheets or even linen napkins if you want to save money.

Saints Who Were Priests

  • The Jesuits were founded by St. Ignatius Loyola. The majority of the images are in black. He used to be a soldier when he was younger, therefore you could actually put on armor if you wanted to
  • St. John Bosco is another figure who is frequently depicted in black. He enjoyed juggling a lot! Carry three balls with you
  • St. John Vianney – Dress in a black robe with a white shirt over the top and a green ribbon or scarf tied across your shoulders to represent his stole. Use ribbon or bits of yellow electrical tape to create crosses on the stole, and then hot glue them in place. Wearing glasses is recommended for St. Jose Maria. St. Francis Xavier is dressed in black vestments. St. Vincent de Paul — He is dressed in black robes with a black skull cap on his head. Click here to get the instructions for constructing an askull cap out of paper. It’s also possible to make them out of felt. Those who follow St. Francis de Sales should carry a sword and scabbard shaped like a cross. The Reverend Andre Bessette — Andre was a farmhand, shoemaker, baker, blacksmith, and factory worker during his lifetime. St.Martin de Porres — Because St. Martin was a barber, this miniature St. Martin de Porres is clutching a pair of play-dough scissors.

Saints Who Were Bishops

See the links above for instructions on how to build priest vestments if you want to make a bishop outfit. Then, if you’d like, you may add a bishop’s hat (miter) and a staff to complete the look.

I absolutely adore these brightly colored paper mitres. My buddy built the bishop hat on the left by attaching cloth over an oatmeal jar, which you can see on the right. She then added a piece of elastic for under the chin to complete the outfit.

  • St. Blaise — This saint is usually shown in purple. Bring two candles with you. This tiny St. Blaise outfit is adorable
  • St. Nicholas — Dress in white with a white beard and carry a little sac filled with chocolate coins. For St. Athanasius, you can dress in white with a white beard and carry a book
  • St. Leo the Great
  • And St. Valentine (wear red and carry a heart) are all good choices when in a hurry. Carry a bee hive or a miniature bumble bee in honor of St. Ambrose
  • St. Kilian
  • St. Gregory of Nazianzen – Carry a book in honor of St. Gregory of Nazianzen
  • St. Patrick – Wear green and carry a shamrock in honor of St. Patrick
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Saints Who Were Popes

Those for the Pope will resemble clothing for the Bishop in terms of appearance. For further information, see the tips above. In addition, some popes prefer to go about in red shoes. There are many saints who have served as popes, but here are a few examples.

  • A crucifix on a stick is carried by Saint Pope John Paul II
  • A pretty cool hat is worn by St. Gregory II
  • Pope St. Gregory the Great – Patron saint of popes
  • Pope St. Pius X
  • And other saints are represented.

Apostles And Biblical Saints

Get into character with a simple “robe” costume that includes a rope tied around your waist and shoes. Here are two simple approaches for creating a headpiece.

  • St. Peter – Tie a few keys to your belt for good measure. St. Joseph — He was a carpenter in his previous life. Keep a hammer and a ruler on your person at all times. Carry a string of fish or a fisherman’s net for St. James or St. John
  • St. John the Baptist – Dress in fur and carry a crucifix and a shell as symbols of his mission. Keep a money bag with you since the Lord summoned St. Matthew when he was working as a tax collector. Because an angel is his emblem, you might carry anangel as an alternative. Carry a crucifix or loaves and fish in honor of St. Phillip
  • St. Andrew is represented by the ” St. Andrew’s Cross “
  • St. John is represented by an eagle
  • St. Paul is represented by a sword and a book, whereas St. Mark is represented by a winged lion. Embroider a Lion stuffed animal onto the hem of your robes. You may even make some wings for your lion out of paper and stick them to his body. Carry an axe in honor of St. Jude

Altar Boys — a group of young men who serve at the altar.

  • St. Dominic Savio — He is frequently shown wearing a suit and a bow tie. Altar Servers are patronized by St. John Berchmans, who is also known as the patron saint of altar servers.

St. Florian is home to a firefighter. It is simple to put together a fireman costume by wrapping strips of duct tape and electrical tape over the bottoms of khaki trousers. Add a pair of red suspenders and a hat, and you’re ready to hit the town! St. Olaf was a Viking pirate. For those who have Viking or pirate costumes, you’ll be ready to go in a heartbeat. St. Isadore is a farmer. A farmer costume is simple to put together even if you are rushing to get ready. Denim? You got it! Check! You’re wearing plaid!

How to Make a Sew Free Saints Costume

Learn how to create a Sew Free Saints Costume, as well as an easy method to make Shepard costumes, nun costumes, and Mary costumes, all in one place with this guide. As part of a class project, my kid was required to write a report about his favorite Saint. He decided on St. Patrick. When I noticed the conditions for the report – you must dress in the attire of your patron saint while presenting an oral report – I was immediately intrigued. I gasped, broke out in a cold sweat, went to bed thinking about it, and then pressed “google”!

  • Patrick in hand.and my kid in tow, of course.
  • My involvement with additional costumes began when I called a couple of my pals for assistance.
  • Patrick’s Day outfit seen above, the following materials were required: Supplies: Please keep in mind that I did not mention a sewing machine because you do not require one!
  • Make a half-fold in the sheet and hold it up to the child’s face.
  • Begin with one cut and work your way around to the other to create a half circle.
  • Allowing the kid to stand on the chair, trim the front and back to the right lengths, It is OK for the bottoms of pants and shoes to be seen.
  • Replace the light blue felt with kelly green felt and repeat the process.

Also, make the edges rounded.

If it is not flawless, no one will be able to detect it.

Curve the corners one more time.

Nobody will be able to see the staples.

To build the “hat,” I took two 12×12 glitter gold sheets of paper and stacked them one on top of the other, cutting one corner off each of the layers as I went (both sheets).

I held the paper (which was two pages stapled together) up to my son’s head and then linked the other side with staples to finish the job.

There are various additional costumes that are simple to make that may be used for all of the upcoming holiday performances.

Instead of a white sheet, use a brown sheet or a brown cloth to do the identical task.

Create “sleeves” by tucking the corners of the belt inside the belt loops.

If you wish to, you can wrap a piece of rope or twine around your head to keep it secure.

Whenever there is a white shirt beneath (or turtle neck).

Do you own a black dress?

If you answered yes, here is a straightforward costume for a young lady.

Do you want Mary to appear in your Christmas show?

This was put together at a Goodwill store in our neighborhood.

Mary was born after a white rope was tied around her waist and a white scarf was wrapped around her head.

Consider what you require and the most convenient method of obtaining it.

Remember, a stapler is your best friend — you don’t actually need a sewing machine or adhesive for this project. Remember that the audience will be a long distance away and will not notice anything. Their attention is solely on the performance!

Sewing Easy All Saints Day Costumes

I thought I’d share some of our saint costumes with you in honor of one of our favorite feast days, which is just around the horizon. Please keep in mind that these are not professionally constructed outfits. In the words of a busy parent who needs to sew four costumes in one weekend or less, these are the “not perfect but good enough” tasks. It has taken me several years to figure out a method to the madness that I can share with you. I’ve compiled a list of five sewing suggestions for All Saints Day costumes that I hope you’ll find helpful.

  • Don’t bother with the cotton.
  • This eliminates the need to pre-wash and press the fabric before to putting it together.
  • By selecting the appropriate material, you were able to eliminate three phases from the costume-making process.
  • But take care.
  • As a result, test your sewing machine on a scrap of material to ensure that you have the proper thread tension and stitch length.
  • To make the pattern more personalized, do the following: Line A – Have your kid stretch out his or her arms and measure the length from wrist to wrist.
  • Make a 1 inch allowance for seam allowance.

Because you will be cutting two pieces of cloth that will be placed right on top of each other, double the width by two.

Line C – Take a measurement from the top of the neck to the desired length.

You’ll need to fold the fabric in half so that you can cut it to size while keeping the tops of the sleeves lined up on the fold.

Make sure to account for seam allowances when cutting your fabric.

For the neck hole, draw a semi-circle on the paper.

If it doesn’t, I make a larger cut to make it fit.

This is how I went about creating Junior’s pattern: After that, cut, stitch, and flip the garment inside out.

Tip 3: Once you’ve completed the tunic, it’s simple to add small touches that bring the outfit to life.

adorable St.

Or St.

Bonaventure, or any other Franciscan saint, for that matter.

Thomas Aquinas for the occasion.

Francis, don’t you think?

CapeVeil And here’s where you’ll find Saint Anne!

Therese, St.

Now that we’ve gotten our groove going, the lads are clamoring for theirs.

As the costumes grow in size, you will need to pin the parts of the tunic together in order to sew them together more accurately.

shawl made of fur (or whatever you call it) Chain and pendant made of gold (made from costume jewelry and a wood ornament painted with glitter glue) And it comes from Amazon (we painted the white rim black) Do you have any idea who this saint is?

Thomas More, please!

Tunic with buttons on the front.

Click here to discover an other method of creating one.

St.

Tip number four: enlist assistance!

There was no way these outfits could have been completed in one weekend without her assistance and guidance.

Finally, but certainly not least, Tip 5: Reuse and recycle.

This year, Sparky was gracious enough to wear the same outfit as last year.

Are you able to guess who he is? St. Anthony of Padua, pray for us! So, I hope this has provided you with some useful information. Have a joyous and beautiful All Saints Day with your family and friends! Keep up to speed with my most recent blogs! Please fill out the form below:

All Saints Day Costumes (DIY)

This past weekend, our family was hard at work putting together our All Saints Day costumes. After a little thinking and rummaging, as well as an hour of cutting and sewing, the costumes for the four children are complete. In spite of the fact that we just used what we had on hand, I believe they turned out beautifully. Every year, I set a goal for myself to make costumes from of things I already have at home while keeping them as basic as possible. Other ideas for celebrating All Saints’ Day at home may be found in my post on 16 Ways to Celebrate All Saints’ Day in Your Home (available in English and Spanish).

St. Maximilian Kolbe

Butchie dressed up as St. Maximilian Kolbe, a Polish priest who chose to die in someone else’s place in the Auschwitz death camp during World War II in Poland. Footy-pajamas with rips, a prisoner badge, and spectacles complete the look (these were pretty hard to keep on, but they could also be drawn on).

St. Lucia

During the Auschwitz concentration camp, Butchie posed as St. Maximilian Kolbe, a Polish priest who volunteered to die in someone else’s stead. The following are the costumes: ripped footy pjs, prisoner badge, and spectacles (these were pretty hard to keep on, but they could also be drawn on).

St. Michael the archangel

Apollo requested to be dressed as St. George, which was a simple task because we already had the majority of the suit from a prior All Saints’ Day. He then changed his mind (oh, darling children!) and decided that St. Michael was his first and most important preference. Fortunately, Sts. Michael and George aren’t too far away, so all we had to do was add some coffee filter wings to complete the look. Costume consists of a gray shirt turned inside out with a felt cross sewed on, a sword, a helmet (made from half a milk jug and duct tape in his Blue Knights class), wings (made from paper and coffee filters), and a shield (made from cardboard and coffee filters) (not pictured).

St. John Vianney

Jim had initially planned to dress as St. Francis of Assisi, but when we realized we didn’t have any brown attire in the home, we decided to go with St. John Vianney instead. We had just finished reading the tale of St. John Vianney, a French priest who lived in the 1800s and had a variety of charisms, so it seemed appropriate. In the summer, our family enjoys commemorating St. John Vianney’s feast day by assisting our parish priest in little but meaningful ways. Graduation robe that I tailored to suit (I knew storing those would come in useful!

Tutorial for the Clerical CollarWe are all geared up for our annual All Saints’ Day celebration with our co-op pals, which will be held this year on November 1st!

I’m interested in hearing about your children’s All Saints Day costumes!

You’ll also like reading:

Jim had initially planned to dress as St. Francis of Assisi, but when we realized we didn’t have any brown attire in the home, we decided to go with St. John Vianney as a last-minute substitution. The tale of St. John Vianney, a French priest who lived in the 1800s and had a variety of charisms, had just been read to us, so it seemed appropriate. In the summer, our family enjoys commemorating St. John Vianney’s feast day by assisting our parish priest in a variety of small tasks. Graduation robe that I tailored to suit (I knew storing those would come in useful!

Wearing a costume to celebrate All Saints’ Day is a tradition for many people. Tell me about your children’s All Saints Day costumes, if you have any.

Easy last-minute no-sew costumes for Halloween and All Saints Day

Another year has passed and the kids need a costume that will work for both neighborhood trick-or-treating and the All Saints Day festivity at CCD, school, or co-op. Here are some ideas to get them started: And don’t worry, we’ve got you covered with very simple costumes that you can put together using items you already have at home! First and foremost, here’s a piece of advice. Take whatever you have in your costume bin and look up a saint associated with it if it’s the night before the party and you’re stuck for inspiration.

  1. Ambrose, who is known as the “Bee Patron Saint.” A puppy costume might be worn in honor of St.
  2. A bug costume might be worn in honor of St.
  3. You get the gist of it.
  4. Rawpixel.com |
  5. The saints Joan of Arc and Saint Martin of Tours, as well as Saint George and Saint Michael the Archangel, may all be your role models.
  6. You can take on the persona of St.
  7. Gianna Molla.

Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, Saint Helen, Saint Margaret of Scotland, and Saint Hedwig are all possible names.

You can play the role of St.

Louis IX of France, St.

Stephen of Hungary, to name a few examples.

You can take on the persona of St.

Isidore.

You have the ability to be St.

If you have an old sheet that can be knotted like a toga, you could use it instead.

Agatha or St.

A track jacket, pants, and shoes are all you need to complete the look.

If you have a baby doll, you should.

Louis Martin, who had nine children between them.

Shutterstock Hopefully, that was plenty to provide you with some inspiration!

Here are two options for more intricate costumes that you may make ahead of time if that’s the case for you.

The icon can be used to portray Saint Philip Neri, Saint Padre Pio, Servant of God Emil Kapaun, or Pope Benedict XVI, among other saints.

Thomas Becket, St.

Patrick, among others.

Still haven’t decided on the perfect costume?

Visit Kennedy Adventures for some simple ideas, Koala Mom for some easy saint costumes specifically for girls, Catholic All Year for over 150 ideas, and Catholic Icing for an extensive directory of saint costumes. You can be sure that one of them will have the perfect costume idea for you!

20 Easy Saint Costumes Made of T-Shirts!

Greetings, fellows! If you’ve been following me for any length of time, you’re probably aware of my penchant for going all out for All Saints’ Day. But, simply to demonstrate that it is not necessary, we will be creating twenty simple saint costumes. entirely out of t-shirts today! For many years, my children and I have worked together to create amazing costumes for our annual All Saints’ Day Pageant, which has become a true family event. We’ve had a coat of armor built by hand for St. Joan of Arc, as well as arrows fashioned by hand for St.

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Nuns, princesses, peasants, and viking kings have all graced the pages of history.

Denis, who is seen bearing his own head.

  • Our Lady of the Snows, St. Zelie Martin, and St. Barbara
  • North American Martyrs
  • Ss. Francisco and Jacinta Marto
  • St. Olaf
  • St. Denis
  • St. Sebastian
  • St. John the Baptist
  • St. Michael
  • St. Francis
  • St. Clare
  • St. Bartholomew
  • St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
  • Our Lady of the Snows

Making costumes that can be worn for both Halloween and All Saints’ Day is something I enjoy doing. Sometimes they are as the saint, and other times they are altered to become something completely new. Consider looking through the MANY saint costume blogs on my blog for extra inspiration. More than 150 All-Saints Day costumes for children are available. MORE THAN 150 MORE Costumes for All Saints Day for Children In the nick of time Costumes that double as Halloween and All Saints Day outfits For Halloween and All Saints’ Day, here are some more twofer costumes.

  • Anything worth doing is worth overdoing, as I like to repeat on a regular basis.
  • In order to demonstrate how to make easy, entertaining, and easily identifiable saint costumes for tiny kids, I’d want to teach you how to make them out of t-shirts.
  • Keep in mind that saints, like everyone else, lived full and diverse lives.
  • And don’t forget about the props!
  • Including an item in your outfit will truly bring it to life.
  • The clothes I utilized were largely adult extra big t-shirts that I purchased from a craft store, which is also where the majority of the props were obtained.
  • Simply turn everything that has images on it inside out.

The costumes you’ll see here were created by purchasing new t-shirts and props, as well as repurposing items we already had around the home. They cost an average of fifteen dollars apiece. Let’s get this party started! Here’s the video version of the story: The specifics are as follows:

1. Saint Elizabeth of Hungary

  • Making costumes that can be worn for both Halloween and All Saints’ Day is something I enjoy doing. Sometimes they are as the saint, and other times they are altered to become something completely different is something I enjoy doing. More ideas may be found in the MANY saint costume postings on my blog. The best Halloween costumes for kids are more than 150 this year! A total of more than 150 Costumes on All Saints Day for Children. It’s the eleventh hour Costumes that double as Halloween and All Saints Day outfits. For Halloween and All Saints Day, here are some more twofer costumes. Costumes on All Saints’ Day are some of my favorite to create. Anything worth doing is worth overdoing, as I like to say. That is my life philosophy. To be clear, I believe that you do not have to go overboard when incorporating the Catholic religion into your family’s home and daily activities. In order to demonstrate how to make easy, entertaining, and easily identifiable saint costumes for little children, I’d want to teach you how to make them out of t-shirts. Nothing more than a recognizable image of the saint from art, photography, or a religious card will suffice. Remember that saints, like all of us, lived full and diverse lives. Regardless of the period of his life will be the most convenient for you to depict your saint. Props should not be overlooked. Tradition has endowed saints with characteristics that may be seen in depictions of them. Being able to incorporate an item into your outfit may make all the difference. Consider your image, then gather a few t-shirts in the appropriate colors, make a few snips with scissors where required, use safety pins and rubber bands as needed, and finish by adding a prop or two to symbolize the saints’ characteristics. The clothes I utilized were largely adult extra big t-shirts that I purchased from a craft store, which is also where the majority of the props were purchased. Also, you may use shirts from a thrift store or old shirts from around the house to do this project. Simply flip everything that has images on it on its inside. Purchases of fresh t-shirts and props, as well as the utilization of household items, brought the cost of the costumes you’ll see here down to an average of fifteen dollars each piece for us. Come on, let’s do this! The video version is as follows: And here are the specifics of the arrangement:

Making costumes that can be worn for both Halloween and All Saints’ Day is something I enjoy doing. Sometimes they are as the saint, and other times they are modified to become something completely new. See the MANY saint costume blogs on my blog for further inspiration. Over 150 All-Saints Day costumes for children are available. MORE THAN 150 Children’s All Saints Day Costumes Last-Minute Arrangements Costumes for Halloween AND All Saints Day in One! For Halloween and All Saints’ Day, here are some more twofers.

  • Anything worth doing is worth overdoing, as I like to say.
  • So today I’d want to teach you how to make inexpensive, entertaining, and easily identifiable saint costumes for tiny kids out of t-shirts using a few simple materials.
  • Keep in mind that saints, like all of us, had a diverse range of lives.
  • Don’t forget about the props!
  • Having a prop can make or break a costume.
  • The clothes I utilized were largely adult extra big t-shirts that I purchased from a craft store, which is also where the majority of the props were acquired.
  • Simply turn anything that has images on it on its side.
  • Let’s get down to business!

2. Saint Patrick

  • Tunic made of white t-shirt and cape made of green t-shirt A green pipe cleaner shamrock and staff, as well as toy snakes and an optional green bishop’s mitre (which may be created out of paper, craft foam sheet, or poster board) are optional accessories/attributes.

Cuts: On the green shirt, cut a trapezoid-shaped piece from the front (leaving the collar band intact) to form the cape for the character. Putting it all together is simple: put on a white tunic and a green cloak. Accessories should be included.

3. Saint Brigid

  • By Alexandra Ogle-Ottinger, 2019
  • By Theophilia on Deviant Art
  • By Alexandra Ogle-Ottinger, 2019
  • Tunic in green t-shirt
  • Toque (head covering) in white t-shirt
  • Veil made of black t-shirt optional accessories/attributes: green pipe cleaner reed cross, staff
  • Optional accessories/attributes:

Tunic in green t-shirt; toque (head covering) in white t-shirt; veil made of black t-shirt. Staff, green pipe cleaners, reed cross, and other optional extras/attributes

4. St. John the Baptist

  • Tunic made of brown t-shirt and wrap made of green t-shirt Head on a plate, honey, insects, shell, and other optional accessories/attributes are available.

Cuts: On the bottoms of the sleeves of the brown shirt, create jagged cuts down the bottoms of the sleeves. Reduce the length of the green shirt by one foot at the bottom (shorter than the brown shirt.) Remove the left sleeve by making a straight cut about 2 feet in length.

Using a diagonal cut, remove the right sleeve and collar from the shirt. Assembly: put on a brown tunic, wrap it with a green scarf, and add some accessories.

5. Saint Mary Magdalene

  • Tunic in off-white t-shirt
  • Cape made of red t-shirt
  • Veil made of red t-shirt Container, egg, and other optional accessories/attributes

Using the red shirt, cut a trapezoid-shaped piece from the front (leaving the collar band in place) to form her cape. Dressing up is simple: put on an off-white shirt, add a crimson cloak, and add a burgundy veil. Accessories should be included.

6. Saint Mother Teresa of Calcutta

  • 2″ broad blue painter’s tape
  • 3 white t-shirts (tunic, wrap, veil)
  • 1″ wide blue painter’s tape Rosary, crucifix, and safety pins are all optional qualities or accessories.

CUTSTAPING: On shirt 1 (the tunic), put tape all around the bottom edge. Repeat on shirt 2. Using a straight cut approximately 2 feet long, cut off the left sleeve of shirt number two (wrap). Using a diagonal cut, remove the right sleeve and collar from the shirt. Remove around 1 foot of the bottom of the container. Apply a strip of tape to the edges of the newly cut pieces of paper. The veil is represented by shirt number three. (I’ll add some tape to it later.) It is recommended that you cut lengths of tape into four extremely thin strips lengthwise and add two thin stripes with each thick stripe for a more realistic effect, but this will be a more difficult undertaking to complete.

Using masking tape, attach a strip of tape around the veil’s rim.

7. Saint Pope John Paul II

  • Tee shirt tunic in white
  • Tee shirt fascia and zucchetto in white
  • Tee shirt cape in red
  • T-shirt tunic in white. Crucifix, rosary, and red shoes are all optional accessories/attributes.

To make a rounded cut on one white shirt, begin by trimming it to around one foot long from the neck and cutting off its long, floppy sleeves. Making the little cape requires cutting a trapezoid-shaped slit from the front of the shirt (while leaving the collar band intact). Making use of a 3 inch band from the bottom of the garment, cut one edge to form a long strip for the fascia (sash belt). The following items are not shown in the video: Remove one sleeve from the shirt. Turn the piece inside out and collect the cut edge, securing it with a little rubber band as you go.

This is your zucchetto, if you will (skullcap).

Pellegrina, zucchetto, and a red cape are all good additions.

8. Saint Joan of Arc

  • A gray long-sleeved t-shirt tunic with white t-shirt overlay
  • A red tape cross
  • Duct tape helmet, cuffs, and belt
  • And a silver duct tape belt. Weapons/accessories/attributes that can be used: swordshield

Make a straight cut along each side of the white t-shirt, starting at the sleeve and working your way down the shirt to the bottom. Maintain the integrity of the collar. Make a scalloped border around the bottom of the cake. Make a red tape cross or a fleur de lis in the center of the front and back of the dress. Cut a 2 foot length of duct tape in half then fold it in half again to get a 1 foot doubled piece of duct tape. Assembly: Put on a gray shirt tunic and pull it over your head to serve as a covering.

To keep the shirt from falling down, wrap a piece of duct tape over the top of the head.

Wrist guards may be made out of duct tape (and keep the sleeves up). Using a 3 inch length of tape on each side of the neck, gather the shirt at each side of the neck and fasten it. Place the overlay over the tunic and secure it in place. Add a belt with tape and some accessories.

9. Saint George

  • A gray long-sleeved t-shirt tunic with a white t-shirt overshirt
  • Red tape
  • Silver tape
  • Optional accessories/attributes: a swordshield and a dragon

Straight along each side of the white t-shirt, cutting off the sleeves and opening each side to the waist-length point, cutstaping is required. Maintain the integrity of the bottom sides. Make a red tape cross in the center of the front and back of the design. Cut a 2 foot length of duct tape in half then fold it in half again to get a 1 foot doubled piece of duct tape. It is intended to serve as the visor of his armor. Assembly: Put on a gray shirt tunic and pull it over your head to serve as a covering.

To keep the shirt from falling down, wrap a piece of duct tape over the top of the head.

Wrist guards can be made out of tape (and keep the sleeves up).

Place the overlay over the tunic and secure it in place.

10. Saint Joseph

  • Art by Cecilia Lawrence (Theophilia on DeviantArt), based on an idea by Fr. Calloway
  • Art by Carstensen, based on a concept by Fr. Calloway
  • T-shirt tunic in brown
  • Green t-shirt cape in green
  • White t-shirt head covering Flowers (typically white), a staff, a hammer, a carpenter’s square, and a dragon are all optional accessories or qualities.

Cutstaping: On the green shirt, cut a trapezoid-shaped cut off the front (leaving the collar band intact) to create his cape, leaving the collar band intact. Attach the flowers to the end of the staff using tape. Assembly consists of the following steps: put on a brown tunic, add a green cloak, add a white head covering, and knot the sleeves at the back. Accessories should be included. Mary is number eleven (Our Lady of Grace)

  • Dress made of white t-shirt and blue t-shirt capebelt, with white t-shirt veil.

To make a belt out of the blue shirt, cut a 2 inch strip off the bottom and cut one side of the strip to form a loop. Making her cape is as simple as cutting a trapezoid-shaped piece off the front (while leaving the collar band intact). To assemble, put on a white shirt, add a blue belt, add a blue cape, and finish off with a white veil.

12. Saint Nicholas

  • Red T-shirt tunic
  • Pallium made of an off-white T-shirt
  • Black tape

The following are optional extras: a beard, a fancy book, a money bag, three gold balls, and three tiny boys in a barrel (if you happen to have little triplets about.Rebecca Gorzynska). TEE CUTS: Cut a broad curving capital-Y form pallium out of an off-white shirt, keeping the top of the Y attached to one shoulder at all times. Crosses of black tape should be added on the pallium. Dressing is simple: put on a white tunic and a pallium. Accessories should be included.

13. Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini

  • Capeletbow, veil, and tunic are all made of black t-shirts. Cross, pocketwatch, and other optional accessories/attributes are available.

Cut the capelet off of shirt 1 by making a circular cut 1 foot away from the neck and cutting the sleeves off of shirt 2. Cut a 3 inch band from the bottom of the shirt and cut one edge to form a long strip from the same garment. (Alternatively, a broad black ribbon might be used for this.) Assembly consists of the following steps: put on a black tunic, add a black capelet, tie a huge bow around the neck with the shirt-strip, and add a black veil. Accessories should be included.

14. Saint John Vianney

  • Cut the capelet off of shirt 1 by making a circular cut 1 foot away from the neck and cutting the sleeves off of shirt 1. Cut a 3 inch band from the bottom of the shirt and cut one edge to create a long strip from the same garment. To do this, you can use a broad black ribbon. Setup is as follows: put on a black tunic and a black capelet, tie a huge bow around the neck using a shirt-strip, and add a black veil. Complete the look by including extras.
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To make the cuts, start with the black shirt and cut two rectangular flaps approximately 4″ long from the collar band. Make a continuous cut down the right side of the green shirt, starting at the bottom edge of the left front (which should be aligned with the left side of the collar), continuing over the left shoulder, over the back yoke just at the edge of the collar, and down the right side. Make a second cut that is 3-4 inches distant from the first to produce a stole that is 3-4 inches wide.

Preparation: Put on the black tunic, then the white shirt over it, then pull out the two rectangular collar pieces and set them on top of the white cassock to complete the look. Wrap the stole across your shoulders. Accessories should be included.

15. Saint Bernadette

  • T-shirt tunic in burgundy
  • T-shirt apron in blue
  • T-shirt wrap in yellow
  • T-shirt veil in off white
  • Rosary, safety pins, and other optional attributes/accessories

The sleeves of the yellow shirt are to be cut straight down either side of the shirt to the bottom. Make a straight cut from the top of the page to the bottom. Dressing: Put on a burgundy shirt, layer the wrap over top of the tunic, and cross the ends of the wrap in the front. Place the apron over your head and knot or pin it at the back. Add a veil and a few accessories.

16. Saint Benedict

  • Tunic made of black t-shirt
  • Cape made of black t-shirt and beard made of white t-shirt Optional extras include: a staff, a fancy book, a crow, and safety pins if necessary.

Cuts: For the hooded cloak, cut a slit along the center front of one black T-shirt (not pictured). Cut a long wavy beard on a white shirt while leaving the neck band intact. Assembly: put on a black shirt, placing the neck band over the top of the head to serve as a strap, apply a t-shirt beard, and drape a hooded cloak over the top of the head and over the shoulders. If necessary, use safety pins to attach the cape to the tunic at the shoulders. Accessories should be included.

17. Saint Thérèse of Lisieux

  • Tunic in brown t-shirt
  • Toque (head covering) in white t-shirt
  • Cape made of off-white t-shirt
  • Veil in black Roses and a cross are optional accessories/attributes.

Preparation: To build her cape, start with a trapezoid-shaped cut from the front of a cream shirt (keeping the collar band intact). Putting it all together is simple: put on a brown tunic and a white toque. The face should be visible via the head opening. Fold the bottom of the white chiffon and collect the majority of it to the back, then place the black veil on top to complete the look. Accessories should be included.

18. Saint Padre Pio of Pietrelcina

  • The Church of Saint Nicholas in Valencia, Spain, contains a fresco
  • Tunic in brown t-shirt
  • Cowl in brown t-shirt
  • Belt made of rope A twin (for bilocating Padre Pio) and four bandaids (one for each side of his hands), as well as black fingerless gloves and four bandaids (one for each side of his hands) are optional accessories/attributes.

Prepare his cowl by cutting off the sleeves of one brown shirt and making a rounded cut along the center of it from the neck to one foot long from the cuffs. Cut a length of rope that is 6-8 feet in length. On one end, tie three huge knots 6 inches apart, 6 inches apart from each other. Putting it all together: put on a brown tunic and a hood. Wrap the rope twice around the waist and tie it, leaving the knotted end hanging loose. Accessories should be included.

19. Saint Francis of Assisi

  • Bird, tonsure, and brown t-shirt tunic with brown t-shirt cowl and rope belt are optional accessories and qualities.

To build his cowl, cut a circular cut into one brown shirt from the collar down to approximately one foot in length and cut the sleeves off to form a cowl. Cut a length of rope that is 6-8 feet in length. On one end, tie three huge knots 6 inches apart, 6 inches apart from each other. Putting it all together: put on a brown tunic and a hood. Wrap the rope twice around the waist and tie it, leaving the knotted end hanging loose. Add some accessories and, for the ultimate show of devotion. a haircut.

20. Saint Lucy

  • Tunic made of white t-shirt
  • Cape belt made of red t-shirt Optional attributes/accessories include: a dish of eyeballs (made from table tennis balls and paint pens), a palm (leftover from Palm Sunday), a wreath of branches and candles, and a palm branch wreath.

Measure and cut a 2 inch strip off the bottom of the red shirt and sew it together to form a belt. Making her cape requires making a trapezoid-shaped cut from the front (while leaving the collar band intact). Assembly is as follows: put on a white shirt, add a red belt, add a red cape, and attach any other accessories.

That’s it!

I hope you’ll be inspired to try one of these outfits or come up with a completely original idea. Keep an eye out at the end of the YouTube video for this month’s book selections that are 25 percent discount! How Saints Die: A Collection of 100 Stories of Hope Saints: Become an image of Christ every day of the year by following their example.

Children’s Saints in the Catholic Tradition Use the code CAY1121 to receive a 25 percent discount on all three books at Ignatius.com through November 20, 2021. By @Ignatius Press by Elizabeth Mirzaei The following CAY items are featured in the video:

  • Calendars for the Year 2022
  • RIP Banner
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RIP BannerEternal Rest Candle2022 Thirteen-Month Liturgical Year Wall Calendar2022 Thirteen-Month Liturgical Year Wall Calendar2022 Patron Saints Poster made by hand In the Catholic All Year Compendium, you may learn more about how to practice liturgical life in your home and how to host an All Saint’s Day pageant. In addition, the Catholic All Year Prayer Companion has prayers and scripture readings for All Hallows’ Eve, All Saints’ Day, and All Souls Day, among other holidays. With a Catholic All Year Membership, you may access downloadable liturgical life tools for the month of November.

Now Available! Limited Edition Advent Resources

Advent Liturgical Living Subscription Boxes are available. Sets of Wooden Jesse Tree Ornaments: 3-inch Set or 2-inch Set with TreeStand

Quick All Saints Day Costume Ideas

+J.M.J.+ The Feast of All Saints can be a source of anxiety for parents who need to put together a saint costume for their children in a short amount of time. Some quick ideas and links for some costumes that you might be able to put together quickly and inexpensively are provided below!

Girl Ideas

Philomena will be serving as her patron this year! In fact, we already had the blue silk scarf from this set in our possession, which we have been using for years. I started by shopping at Goodwill for the remainder of her costume. I discovered the following:

  • Goodwill is selling this outfit for $4.99. The outfit in question was originally designed for a mature lady and was modified by me using just very basic sewing abilities to make it suit her.) Because I couldn’t locate a dress that worked in a kid’s size, this ended up being a little more expensive than if we had purchased a kid’s dress instead.
  • The gold tie she wore around her waist was a $0.99 curtain tie from Target. The contents of a $0.75 bag, which included little corn cob holders that I spray painted silver to look like arrow points

I discovered the following items at Hobby Lobby:

  • An inexpensive wooden anchor that I spray-painted silver for $3.49
  • A pair of dowel rods for $0.74 apiece will serve as the arrows.

We were able to find the flowers for her crown as well as the palm branch at Michaels. These were all around $7.00 and significantly more costly than in previous years, but artificial flowers were nearly completely sold out in two Walmarts, Hobby Lobby, and Dollar Tree because of the current supply chain difficulties! The total cost of her outfit came to $17.95 after the discount. We will be taking excellent care of these flowers this year in order to preserve them for future usage, as they were the cause of this year’s high cost!

Saint Cecilia

Zelie has chosen to be Saint Cecilia for this year’s celebration. Our daughter’s costume consisted of a $3.99 outfit from Goodwill, a $0.99 curtain tie for her waist, a toy lap harp that we already had, and then around $6.00 in imitation flowers, bringing her total cost for the year to approximately $10.98. (You could also create a harp out of cardboard and thread it together with yarn, or purchase an inexpensive toy harp like this.)

St. Joan of Arc

Once upon a time, Philomena was Saint Joan of Arc. To dress like French peasants, we purchased a basic tan shirt and flowery frock at a thrift store for $6.50 each, and a breastplate at the dollar store for an additional $1.50 each. I paid $1.09 for a quarter yard of blue felt for the flag, which was actually more than double what we required. A piece of wood from the backyard was used to hold it together while I drew and filled in the outline of a fleur de lis we had printed out using a less than $2 bottle of fabric paint I found at the dollar store.

St. Elizabeth of Hungary

Once upon a time, Zelie was St. Elizabeth (she is pictured above with St. Joan of Arc). We utilized a princess outfit that we already possessed, as well as a toy crown and chapel veil that we already had on hand.

It was only a dollar a piece that I purchased the jewelry, basket, and roses at Goodwill. On All Saints Day, I wrapped a loaf of bread in plastic wrap and placed it in her basket. Including the bread, the entire cost of her outfit was $3.50 for the two of us!

St. Agnes

Here is the year in which Zelie was honored as Saint Agnes. This holy saint is always shown in basic clothing with a belted waist and a lamb in his arms, sometimes with a shawl and a palm branch in his hands. In order for Zelie to be dressed appropriately for this occasion, we purchased a Princess Lea costume dress at Goodwill for $3.25, from which I removed the belt. Then I added some rope we had in the garage (you can typically get rope in the floral craft department at Dollar Tree), a stuffed lamb we had in our play bin, one of our favorite silk scarves that I tied around her shoulders to serve as her shawl, and a palm branch I purchased for $2 at Hobby Lobby.

The Blessed Virgin Mary

One year, Philomena decided to take on the role of the Blessed Mother. At Goodwill, I saw this white dress among the typical girl’s clothing for $3.99, which I thought was a steal. It had some renaissance-style sleeves and a few little green flowers, which I took off. We wrapped a blue belt from Dollar Tree that we already had around her waist, a family rosary around her arm, one of her favorite silk scarves over her neck as her veil, and she is dressed as Baby Jesus with her favorite doll.

St. Helen

Using a toy crown like this and a cardboard copy of a cross, you can easily recreate St. Helen, who was the first person to uncover the genuine Cross of Christ.

St. Maria Goretti

The lovely young St. Maria Goretti is often shown with a modest shawl wrapped around her shoulders and a bouquet of white lilies, which symbolise her innocence. This costume may be made in minutes with a shawl or scarf wrapped over the shoulders and dollar store flowers.

St. Kateri

St. Kateri can be created by dressing in an Indian attire such as this and adding a cross necklace or a little crucifix to the outfit.

St. Lucy

St. Lucy is famously represented with her eyes on a plate, which might be reproduced using a brass dish from a thrift store and eyeball candies affixed to the surface with hot glue. The long palm branch should be easily purchased at any craft store or even in the artificial flower aisle of Walmart, depending on where you live.

St. Anne

Given that the mother of the Blessed Virgin is generally shown with the scroll, a simple garment, scarf around the head, and an unrolled scroll would enough to create this costume quite quickly and easily.

Boy Ideas

This aroman solider outfit, available on Amazon or at a thrift store, may be used to portray any of these saints with little difficulty. Alternatively, you could use any basic soldier armor and a large scrap of red fabric for the cloak, and it would function just as well. (The armor Philomena is wearing as St. Joan of Arc was purchased at Dollar Tree, and there were numerous other extra options available, such as a shield and a sword, that could be used for this project as well. This can be done on the cheap with three of those Dollar Tree armor components and a $3 yard of red fabric from the craft shop.)

St. Dominic Savio

This aroman solider outfit, available on Amazon or at a thrift store, may be used to portray any of these saints with relative ease. It would also work just as well if you used any basic soldier armor and a large scrap of red cloth for a cloak. (The armor Philomena is wearing as St.

Joan of Arc was purchased at Dollar Tree, and there were numerous other extra options available, such as a shield and a sword, that could be combined for this project.) With three of the Dollar Tree armor things and a $3 yard of red cloth from the craft shop, this can be accomplished on a budget! ).

St. Mark

Saint Mark might be created with a plush toy lion like this, a feather pen, and a scroll made of folded up paper. You might be able to locate an ageneric Bible figure costume like this at a thrift store to round out the appearance a little bit. Otherwise, I’d just have a boy wear a basic shirt and slacks and drape a shred of cloth about him for a more casual appearance.

St. Joseph

We frequently see our favorite carpenter as a traveler on the road to Bethlehem, a staff in hand and a headdress tied with a rope in the background of the painting. You could easily make this with a huge stick and some leftover cloth tied together with Dollar Tree rope, or you could purchase a Christmas pageant outfit like this one. If you want to do anything similar to this shot, you may have a boy handle a saw and a lathe. It makes no difference what he wears; his signature lillies may be purchased for a low price to go with either ensemble.

It’s quite OK to pick a couple of the aspects that a saint is shown with and run with them.

Rather of focusing on Pinterest-worthy photographs of our patron saints, we should focus on getting our children enthused about the saints, their stories, and their virtuous lives.

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