How Did Saint Rose Of Lima Die

Rose of Lima

The feast day is on August 23rd. The date of canonization is April 2, 1671. The date of the beatification was April 15, 1668. Isabel de Flores was so lovely as a baby that she was nicknamed “Rose,” the most beautiful of all the flowers, since she was so gorgeous even as a baby. The fact that Isabel was born in 1586 in Lima, Peru, where she grew up, and had a knack for gardening does not surprise us. It is no surprise that she chose the name “Rose” as her confirmation name. As she tended to the flowers in her family’s garden, she spoke a few words of prayer.

Rose’s parents had hoped that she would marry, but she had decided that she wanted to devote her life entirely to God.

They required Rose to remain at home, assisting in the support of the family.

During the day, she made money by selling her flowers to passersby.

  • People bought the garments she decorated.
  • Having prayed, she put her intentions into action.
  • She rose to become a well-liked woman in her own nation.
  • Despite the fact that she never became a nun, she did take vows with the Third Order of St.
  • Rose was a poor example of self-care.
  • She didn’t get enough sleep and she didn’t consume enough nutritious food.
  • When she died in 1617, she was just 31 years old, and people from all over Lima flocked to her burial Mass to express their gratitude to God for filling Rose with such a deep love for everyone.
  • On the 23rd of August, we commemorate Rose of Lima.
  • Taking inspiration from Rose’s life, we should go out to our neighbors and use our abilities to assist them live better lives.

Saint Rose of Lima

Home PhilosophyReligion Personages associated with religion Scholars SaintsPopes Saint of Peruvian origin Alternative titles include: Isabel Flores de Oliva is a resident of Santa Rosa de Lima. St. Rose of Lima is a Spanish saint. Isabel Flores de Oliva, also known as Santa Rosa de Lima or Isabel Flores de Oliva (born April 20/30, 1586, Lima, Viceroyalty of Peru—died August 24, 1617, Lima; canonized April 12, 1671; feast day August 23, formerly August 30), was the first person born in the Western Hemisphere to be canonized bythe Roman Catholic Church.

  1. Rosa (her given name) was born into an aristocratic family, but she was led to penitential rituals and a spiritual life at an early age by the example of her parents.
  2. Rosa, a lovely young woman, chopped her hair and scorched her skin with scorching peppers in order to dissuade suitors.
  3. Catherine of Siena as her example, during the ten-year battle that raged between the two of them.
  4. As a result, Rosa chose rigorous confinement and contemplation, withdrawing to the isolation of a hut in the family yard, where she experienced a life of great austerity and asceticism, which she documented in her journal.
  5. Rosa was committed to the sick and needy in her neighborhood, bringing them to her hut on a regular basis to care for them despite the fact that she lived in seclusion.
  6. Her funeral was a public event, and several miracles were reported to have occurred as a result of her death.

Those in charge of editing the Encyclopaedia Britannica Melissa Petruzzello was the author of the most recent revision and update to this article.

Saint Rose of Lima

The Life of Saint Rose of Lima Among the characteristics shared by all saints is the suffering of resistance; yet, one trait shared by the first canonized saint of the New World is severe mortification, which is more for admiration than imitation. She was born in Lima, Peru, to parents of Spanish origin at a period when South America was in the midst of its first century of Christian evangelizing. The young lady seemed to have adopted Catherine of Siena as a role model, despite the opposition and contempt of her parents and friends.

  1. As a result, Rose used to apply pepper on her face in order to develop disfiguring blotches, which she thought would make her more beautiful.
  2. When her parents’ financial situation deteriorated, she toiled in the garden all day and stitched at night to supplement their income.
  3. They refused to allow her to join a convent, and she maintained her life of penance and seclusion at home as a member of the Third Order of Saint Dominic as a result of their refusal.
  4. She set up a chamber in the house where she cared for homeless children, old people, and the ill in her final years.
  5. Despite the fact that she lived and worked in seclusion, she was brought to the notice of Inquisition interrogators, who were only able to conclude that she was inspired by grace.
  6. If we recall Rose’s extraordinary penances, we should also recall the most important aspect of her life: a devotion to God that was so strong that it could withstand criticism from without, intense temptation, and extended periods of illness and suffering.
  7. Her casket was carried by a procession of prominent men.
  8. A lady wearing a crown of thorns, on the other hand, may at the very least prick our consciences.
  9. We eat and drink excessively, employ a plethora of technological devices, and bombard our senses with everything possible.
  10. It appears that when we have become the most enslaved, there is the most discourse about “liberty.” Are we willing to maintain our self-discipline in such an environment?

The Americas are represented by Saint Rose of Lima, who is their patron saint. Florists Latin America is a continent that includes PeruPhilippines South America is a continent with a population of over a billion people.

Biography of Saint Rose of Lima

Peru, South America, and the Philippines are all represented by the figure of St. Rose of Lima. Isabel de Flores was her given name. She was born on April 20, 1586, in the Peruvian capital of Lima. Her father was a Puerto Rican who had migrated to Peru with the Spanish conquistadors in 1548, when she was a child. The name “Rose” was given to her by a housemaid who, upon seeing her when she was still a newborn, said, “She’s as pretty as a rose.” Her mother had determined that Rose would be the name she would give to her daughter, and she was subsequently confirmed with that name at the time of her confirmation.

  1. A great deal of confusion from her parents and friends resulted from her refusal to enter a convent and her want to remain single when her parents refused her permission to do so.
  2. She worked needlework and sold the flowers she grew in order to contribute to the family’s financial well-being as well.
  3. Dominic and transformed a little cabin in the garden into a hermitage, where she spent a lot of her time praying and contemplating.
  4. Despite the fact that she was thirty-one years old when she died on August 24, 1617, she was canonized by Pope Clement XII in 1671.
  5. Rose of Lima.
  6. Collect money for the St.

You enflamed Saint Rose of Lima with your love, so that she could be separated from the rest of the world and devote herself entirely to you; grant, we pray, that we may walk the paths of life on earth and drink from the springs of your delights in heaven because of her intercession and intercessions.

Tylenda, J.

(pp.

Georgetown University Press is based in Washington, D.C.

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: St. Rose of Lima

Please consider making a donation to New Advent in order to receive the complete contents of this website as an immediate download. A single purchase of $19.99 provides access to the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa Theologica, Bible, and other resources. Virgin, patroness of America, was born on April 20, 1586, in Lima, Peru, and died on August 30, 1617, in Lima. She was given the name Rose during her confirmation in 1597 because a miraculous rose had been observed to change her face when she was a child.

  • This had such an impact on her that she decided to dedicate her life to prayer and mortification from that point on.
  • Her obedience and unremitting effort resulted in her making quick progress via careful attention to herparents’ guidance, her studies, and her household chores, particularly those requiring the use of a sewing machine.
  • Catherine, she made the decision to use her as a model for her own life.
  • Throughout this process, she had to contend with the disapproval of her peers, the mockery of her relatives, and the disapproval of her parents.
  • Finally, she made the decision to swear an oath of virginity, and, driven by supernatural love, she went to incredible lengths to see that it was fulfilled.
  • The fight lasted ten years until she was successful in gaining their agreement to pursue her mission through patience and prayer.
  • Daily fasting was quickly followed by a permanent abstention from meat, which was followed by the consumption of just the coarsest of foodstuffs and only enough to sustain life.

When her work schedule permitted it, she went to a little grotto in their small garden, which she had constructed with the assistance of her brother, and spent her evenings there in isolation and meditation.

She acquired the habit of St.

Following that, she increased the harshness and diversity of her penances to a heroic degree, all the while wearing a metal spiky crown hidden by flowers and an iron chain around her waist as a continuous reminder of her crimes.

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In the event that she was unable to stand, she took refuge in an elaborately crafted bed she had fashioned from shattered glass, stone, pottery shards, and thorns.

Fourteen years have passed since her body became a martyr, yet she has not been without solace throughout this time.

It was at these times that she offered to Him all of her mortifications and penances as atonement for her crimes against His Divine Majesty, for the idolatry of her kingdom, for the conversion of sinners, and for the souls in Purgatory.

Her death was followed by a slew of miracles. She was beatified by Pope Clement IX in 1667 and canonized by Pope Clement X in 1671, making her the first American to receive this honor. Her feast day is commemorated on August 30th. She is seen with a crown of flowers around her head.

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Please consider making a donation to New Advent in order to receive the complete contents of this website as an immediate download as a thank you. A single purchase of $19.99 provides access to the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa Theologica, Bible, and much more. Patroness of America born in Lima, Peru, on April 20, 1586, and died in Lima on August 30, 1617, was the first woman to be given this title. As a result of a magical rose appearing on her face when she was a child, she received the name Rose during her Confirmation in 1597.

  1. Because of this, she was driven to commit her life to prayer and mortification from that point on.
  2. Her obedience and unremitting effort resulted in her making quick progress via careful attention to herparents’ guidance, her studies, and her household chores, particularly those requiring the use of a sewing needle.
  3. Catherine.
  4. Her friends objected, her relatives laughed at her, and her parents disapproved of her.
  5. The Blessed Sacrament, which she venerated every day, occupied a significant amount of her time.
  6. To fulfill her vow of virginity, she took exceptional measures.
  7. During the ten-year battle, she was able to gain their agreement to continue her mission only after showing patience and prayer.

Daily fasting was quickly followed by a lifelong abstention from meat, which was followed by the consumption of just the coarsest of foodstuffs and only enough to keep one’s body going.

Once a week, when her work schedule allowed, she went to a little grotto she had constructed in their small garden with the assistance of her brother, where she spent her evenings in silence and meditation.

The habit of Saint Dominic was bestowed upon her when she was twenty years old.

There were days when I didn’t eat anything except a drink of gall mixed with bitter herbs.

Even the notion of sleeping down on it made her shake with terror, she acknowledged.

We believe that Our Lord showed Himself to her on a regular basis, filling her soul with such indescribable pleasure and serenity that she was in ecstasy for hours.

Following her death, a series of miracles occurred.

‘Herfeast Day’ is observed on August 30th, and it’s called ‘Herfeast Day’ since it is a day dedicated to the goddess Hera. With a crown of roses around her head, she is shown.

About this page

Citation in the APA style (1912). St. Rose of Lima is a saint from Peru. It may be found in the Catholic Encyclopedia. The Robert Appleton Company is based in New York. citation. Edward Aymé is a fictional character created by author Charles Dickens in the novel The Great Gatsby. “St. Rose of Lima,” or “St. Rose of Lima.” The Catholic Encyclopedia, 13th edition. The Robert Appleton Company published a book in New York in 1912. Transcription. By Michael T. Barrett, this piece was transcribed for the publication New Advent.

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St. Rose of Lima – Saints & Angels

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Saint Rose of Lima: August 30th, Let’s Celebrate!

Saint Rose of Lima, also known as Santa Rosa de Lima in Spanish, is commemorated and celebrated as a public holiday today. Saint Rose was the patron saint of Peru, as well as the rest of Latin America’s indigenous peoples and the people of the Philippines. In 1956, the lovely patron saint was born in Lima, Peru, to Spanish colonists, and she became well-known for her religious devotion and virginity. Currently, she is being honored all around Peru, with a national holiday being proclaimed in her honor.

The rose crown, the anchor, and the city are the symbols that are connected with her.

Saint Rose of Lima: A history

Isabel Flores de Oliva was born on April 20, 1586, in the Peruvian capital of Lima. Despite the fact that her given name was Isabel, she rapidly got the moniker ‘Rose’ owing to the gorgeous rose-colored cheeks she possessed as a youngster. Despite the fact that Isabel Flores de Oliva was up in an impoverished household, her parents felt she might be the key to their escape from poverty since her excellent beauty would attract affluent men from all over the world. This, however, was not what young Rose desired, and she instead chose to devote her life to God, a devotion for which she demonstrated from an early age.

  • Instead of allowing this to hold her back, Ms.
  • The selling of needlework and sales provided her with a source of income, and she made it her life’s job to care for individuals suffering from disease in her modest cottage.
  • Flores’ commitment to assisting others did not go unnoticed, and she was finally called to join the Dominican Order, which accepted her application without charging her any fees because of her poor position.
  • She began to subsist solely on bread and water, even donning an inward-facing spike-shaped crown in remembrance of Christ’s crown of thorns, and she took a vow of celibacy to demonstrate her great dedication.
  • She had precisely foreseen her own death just a few days before she died, and she died at the age of 31.

Her commitment to God and to helping others did not go unnoticed, and grateful people from all over the world came to pay their respects to the saint-to-be, whose burial had to be postponed by two days in order to accommodate everyone who wanted to pay their respects!

Saint Rose of Lima: Beatification

She was born on the 20th of April, in the Peruvian capital of Lima, on the 20th of April, 1586. The moniker ‘Rose’ was given to her because she had lovely rose-colored cheeks as a youngster, despite the fact that her given name was Isabel. In Isabel Flores de Oliva’s early years, she was raised in poverty by her parents, who hoped that her excellent beauty would attract affluent men from all over the world, and that she would be the key to their escape from poverty. As a result of her devotion to God from a very young age, little Rose did not want to follow in her mother’s footsteps and instead chose to follow her heart.

  • Instead of allowing this to hold her back, Ms.
  • She was able to generate income via the selling of needlework and other items, and she made it her life’s mission to care for sick people in her modest home.
  • Flores was dedicated to assisting others, and she was finally invited to join the Dominican Order without having to pay a fee since the Order considered her financial position.
  • She began to subsist solely on bread and water, even donning an inward-facing spike-shaped crown in remembrance of Christ’s crown of thorns, and she took a vow of celibacy to demonstrate her devotedness to the cause.
  • Flores suffered greatly as a result of her dedication, and she died on August 24th, 1617, at the age of 31, exactly as she had foreseen in the days preceding her death.
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Saint Rosa Of Lima – Biography

Isabel Flores de Oliva was born on April 20, 1586, in Lima, Peru, to a family of noblemen. The moniker ‘Rose’ was given to her even though her given name was Isabel, since she had beautiful rose-colored cheeks as a youngster. In Isabel Flores de Oliva’s early years, she was raised in an impoverished family, who hoped that her excellent looks would help them escape their plight, since affluent men from all over the world would be drawn to her. This, however, was not what young Rose desired, and she instead chose to devote her life to God, a commitment she shown from an early age.

  • Instead of allowing this to hold her back, Ms.
  • The selling of needlework and sales provided her with a source of income, and she made it her life’s job to care for individuals who were sick in her modest home.
  • Flores was dedicated to assisting others, and she was finally welcomed to join the Dominican Order without having to pay a fee, taking her financial condition into consideration.
  • She began to subsist solely on bread and water, even donning an inward-facing spike-shaped crown in remembrance of Christ’s crown of thorns, and she took a vow of celibacy to demonstrate her devotedness to Christ.
  • Flores suffered greatly as a result of her dedication and died on August 24th, 1617, at the age of 31, exactly as she had foreseen in the days preceding her death.

People from all over the world gathered to pay their respects to the future saint, whose burial had to be postponed for two days in order to accommodate everyone who wanted to pay their respects!

St. Rose of Lima

Isabel Flores de Oliva was born on April 20th, 1586, in Lima, Peru, to a wealthy family. Despite the fact that her given name was Isabel, she rapidly gained the moniker ‘Rose’ owing to the gorgeous rose-colored cheeks she possessed as a youngster. Isabel Flores de Oliva grew raised in an impoverished family who felt she could be the key to their escape from poverty since her excellent beauty would attract affluent men from all over the world. This, however, was not what young Rose desired, and she instead chose to devote her life to God, a love she shown from a very young age.

  • Ms.
  • With the sale of needlework and sales, she was able to supplement her income, and she made it her life’s job to care for sick people in her modest home.
  • Flores’ commitment to assisting others did not go unnoticed, and she was finally welcomed to join the Dominican Order without having to pay a fee, after taking her financial position into consideration.
  • She began to subsist solely on bread and water, even donning an inward-facing spike-shaped crown in remembrance of Christ’s crown of thorns, and she took a vow of celibacy to demonstrate her great dedication.
  • Flores suffered greatly as a result of her dedication and died on August 24th, 1617, at the early age of 31.
  • Her commitment to God and to helping others did not go unnoticed, and grateful people from all over the world came to pay their respects to the saint-to-be, whose burial had to be postponed for two days in order to accommodate everyone who wanted to pay their respects!

Life of St. Rose of Lima – Saint Rose of Lima School

St. Rose of Lima was born on April 20, 1586, in the Peruvian capital of Lima. She is the patroness of Latin America, as well as of the Philippines, among other places. The original name of this South American Saint is Isabel, but because she was such a lovely baby, she was given the name Rose, which has stayed with her. As she got older, she grew more and more lovely, to the point that her mother decided to place a wreath of flowers on her head to show off her beauty to her friends and family.

  • As a result, she inserted a lengthy pin into the wreath, which punctured her so deeply that she had difficulty removing the wreath once it was removed.
  • In order to avoid this, she peppered her face until it was red and burned.
  • Rose worked tirelessly to support her impoverished parents, and she obediently followed their orders, except when they attempted to persuade her to marry.
  • Her devotion to Jesus was so strong that whenever she spoke of Him, her face shone and her eyes twinkled with delight.
  • Despite this, she happily handed Him all of her difficulties.
  • Rose died on the 24th of August, 1617.

Her death was followed by a series of miracles. She was beatified by Pope Clement IX in 1667 and canonized by Pope Clement X in 1671, making her the first American to receive this distinction. Her feast day is on August 23rd this year. She is seen with a crown of flowers around her head.

Rose of Lima (1586–1617)

Mystic and ascetic from Peru who was canonized by the Roman Catholic Church in 2000, becoming the first person born in the Americas to be thus honored. Rosa de Lima is also known by several other names, including Rosa de Santa Mara and Rosa of Lima. In Lima, Peru, on April 20 or 30, 1586, Isabel Flores de Oliva was born; she died on August 24, 1617, also in Lima; she was the daughter of Gaspar de Flores and Maria de Oliva; she was never married and had no children. It is reported that he defended Lima from pirates in 1615; canonization processes were started in 1618; he was beatified in 1668; and he was canonized in 1715.

The conquest of the once-great Inca Empire by the Spanish conquistadors, as well as the equally critical enslavement of the conquistadors themselves by agents of the Spanish crown, resulted in the formation of a new civilization in 16th-century Peru.

This city, which was founded in 1535, had a population that was primarily composed of native Americans, Africans, and people of mixed descent, but it was dominated by a small Spanish elite that traced its right to rule back to its participation in the conquest and the early civil wars of the Americas.

  1. The saints of the Church were considered to be some of the most influential cultural figures of their day.
  2. Certainly, the saints were deemed worthy of imitation, and every now and then, a person would come in society who, in the eyes of those around her or him, appeared to be exhibiting great holiness.
  3. It is possible to demonstrate extreme virtue via scorn for worldly things, comforts or pleasures as well as by extraordinary acts of charity or compassion toward the less fortunate.
  4. In this pre-scientific era, accounts of supernatural happenings, such as apparitions, predictions, or miracles, were commonly believed and disseminated quickly, contributing to an individual’s reputation for sanctity as a result of their occurrence.
  5. This could eventually lead to calls for canonization, which is the official recognition of sainthood by the Catholic Church.
  6. Rose Flores was one of numerous children born to Gaspar Flores and Mara de Oliva, a Spanish couple who lived in Lima at the time of her birth on April 20 or 30 in the year 1586.

According to a story that was widely circulated at the time, the name change was inspired by Mariana, an Indian maidservant in the Flores household who, when young Isabel was still a baby, declared that she was so beautiful that she reminded her of a rose, a European flower that had only recently been introduced to Peru by Christopher Columbus.

Only the infant’s original name-giver refused to participate; for years, the elderly woman insisted on referring to her granddaughter as Isabel instead of Isabelle.

He was a soldier who arrived in Peru sometime around 1548 and saw battle against a renegade band of Spaniards commanded by Gonzalo Pizarro, as well as in border wars against unsubdued Indians.

Later on in life, around the time he made the decision to marry and start a family, Flores was rewarded for his service with a comfortable assignment as a harquebusier (an armed soldier with a specific style of gun) in the viceregal guard, a position that was largely ceremonial and did not pay much but was safe and allowed him to live in Lima with his wife, children, and mother-in-law.

  1. Their home was in the fashionable downtown neighborhood, but they were not affluent, and they were forced to participate in a variety of various economic pursuits to make ends meet.
  2. In order to supplement their income, Mara taught youngsters to read and write, while Rose learnt to embroider and sew, and she also sold the fruit and flowers that the family raised in their garden.
  3. It was in 1597 that Toribio Alfonso de Mogrovejo (1538–1606), the famed archbishop of Lima, paid a visit to the town.
  4. As soon as Rose’s family brought her to the altar for the sacrament, the revered bishop confirmed her under the religious name Rosa de Santa Mara, so granting the Church’s approval to the name change made by her mother years earlier on the spur of the moment.
  5. Because both Rose and Toribio de Mogrovejo would eventually be canonized, devout Catholics have long regarded the brief meeting between them in the tiny stone church at Quives as having special significance.
  6. Rose was not an intelligent, despite the fact that she possessed creative abilities.
  7. However, her poetry was unremarkable, and she left no significant corpus of written letters behind her.
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The reality of the matter is that the majority of what we know about Rose comes from declarations made during her canonization processes by persons who had known her in her previous life before her death.

The fact that people who desired to live virtuously usually attempted to emulate the behavior of their own favorite saints added to the difficulty.

Was Rose attempting to imitate Catherine’s actions, or did others around her just assign Catherine’s activities to her as they did?

Frances Parkinson Keyes, who has been dead for nearly three hundred years, is still alive.

Rose Flores, like her mother and grandmother before her, was known for preferring solitude and prayer over the company of other children.

She also took a secret vow of lifelong virginity at a young age, probably at such a young age that she was unable to fully appreciate the repercussions of her decision.

In fact, when her brother Hernando teased her by drawing attention to her beautiful hair, she took a pair of scissors and cut it off.

She complied with the request to cut her hair short and dress in attractive clothes, but she was dissatisfied with the results.

In reality, Rose attempted to enter a convent on two separate times, but was unsuccessful.

The failure of Rose Flores to become a cloistered nun has been explained by those who are skeptical of supernatural intervention as a result of her unwillingness to defy the wishes of her mother and father, as well as the Flores family’s continued reliance on the income from her needlework and flower sales.

  • Rose entered the Third Order of the Dominicans in 1606, in imitation of her ideal Catherine of Siena, which allowed her to become betrothed to Jesus Christ while continuing to live at home with her parents, siblings and sisters, and other relatives.
  • The white and black Dominican costume, as opposed to the feminine clothing her mother had insisted on, was Rose’s chosen form of dress until her death, and she became a recognizable figure on the streets and in the churches of Lima when dressed in this manner.
  • In order to keep bodily agony as a permanent companion, she wrapped an iron belt around her waist, locked it, and tossed the key down a well.
  • She had fashioned a pewter crown of thorns for herself in order to better understand and emulate the sufferings of Jesus Christ.
  • Although Rose made every attempt to maintain secrecy, word of her visions and other spiritual experiences, as well as her severe mortification, spread quickly.
  • Following a lengthy interrogation in front of witnesses, during which Rose responded calmly and modestly to all of the inquisitors’ questions, the inquisitors announced their conclusion that Rose’s gifts were the result of the Holy Spirit’s inspiration.
  • The residents of Lima sought Rose’s companionship and favor, hoping to be touched in some manner by the same holiness that she had experienced.

Rose’s influential fans included at least one viceroy’s wife, the marquise of Montes Claros, who was one of her most powerful supporters.

From her perspective, the luxury of life enjoyed by the ruling families of Lima was incompatible with the ideal of humility in God’s service, which she held dear.

In her parents’ house, she built an infirmary for the care of the needy, which became her most significant private charitable endeavor.

However, as she had done with so many other aspects of her daughter’s unusual personality, she eventually came to accept it and even attended to the patients herself when Rose was away from the house on other matters.

Rose’s reported prediction that Mara herself would one day become a nun in the proposed community was met with skepticism by her mother at the time, according to a story from the time.

Although it had been Rose’s favorite place since she was a child, the garden of the Flores home in Lima remained her favorite spot, where she claimed to have “heard the voice of the Lord God.

Mara de Uzátegui, who had come to visit her and had complained of mosquito bites, is said to have told her that the insects always left her alone when she told her this on one occasion.

When the Dutch pirate Joris van Spilbergen (1568–1620), who had been raiding Spanish settlements along the Pacific coast of South America, attempted to attack Lima in 1615, it is believed to have been the first of many such occurrences in the city.

Spilbergen’s men were killed by Rose, according to another version of the story.

Although Rose is usually considered as a gorgeous woman, evidently she was not robust.

It is believed that her condition began to deteriorate shortly after her claimed meeting with the pirates, and we are informed that she properly predicted the date of her own death.

By the time she died, Rose’s reputation for holiness had become well-known throughout Lima and its jurisdiction, and news of her death sparked widespread protests across the city.

It was a near riot.

In 1618, just months after Rose’s death, officials in Lima started an inquiry into her life and virtues as a first step toward presenting her cause to the pope as a candidate for canonization.

Her modest cell in the grounds of her parents’ home became a pilgrimage shrine, and her devotees worshipped her relics as well as a picture of her that hung in the Dominican church.

When Pope Clement IX declared Rose to be “blessed” in 1668, a significant milestone was reached.

This is known as beatification, and it allows believers to commemorate her in her home diocese. When Pope Clement XII publicly confirmed Rose’s canonization in 1671, it was just three years after she was first recognized as a saint.

sources:

Frances Parkinson Keyes is a writer and poet. The Rose and the Lily: The Lives and Times of Two South American Saints is a biography of two South American saints. Hawthorn Books, New York, 1961. Luis Martn is the author of this work. In Peruvian history, the Viceroyalty of Peru was ruled by women who were descended from the Conquistadors. The University of New Mexico Press published this book in 1983 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Vargas Ugarte, Rubén, S.J.Vida deSanta Rosade Santa Mara (Santa Rosade Santa Maria).

Tipografa Peruana (Peruvian Typography), 1951.

suggested reading:

Sara Maynard is the author of this work. The Life and Times of Saint Rose of Lima, often known as the “Rose of America.” SheedWard Publishing Company, New York, 1943. (for young readers). Louisiana Tech University’s Stephen Webre is a professor of history who teaches in Ruston, Louisiana.

Memorial of Saint Rose of Lima, Virgin

Optional Memorial Service on August 23rd White is the liturgical color. Patron Peru’s patron saint, florists, and gardeners She was the first saint of the New World, and she overcame herself via a frontal onslaught. Isabel Flores de Oliva was born to a middle-class Catholic family in colonial Spain, which is now Peru, and became the patron saint of the country. When she was confirmed by Lima’s bishop, who would go on to become Saint Turibius of Mongrovejo, she was given the name “Rose.” Her nickname, “Rose,” had been given to her when she was a child after a servant said that she was as lovely as a rose.

However, she had made the decision from an early age to devote her life entirely to Christ, and she intentionally discouraged male attraction by cutting her hair, rubbing pepper into her clean skin to blister her face, and hurting her feminine hands with the acidic juice of limes, among other measures.

The Dominican Sisters of the Third Order are lay people who are committed to practicing Catholicism in accordance with Dominican spiritual goals outside of the cloister.

Rose, on the other hand, pushed her Third Order spirituality beyond its natural boundaries.

Rose’s father, in an effort to accommodate her wishes, permitted her to live apart from the rest of the family in a tiny hut on his property for a period of time.

Rose’s popularity was derived from her loving care for the ill, but it was probably most notably derived from her incredible austerity and a series of miraculous occurrences that occurred as a result of her austerity.

Similarly to Rose, Saint Catherine was a stay-at-home mom from a big family who had a high, if not a super-high, tolerance for bodily pain and suffering.

Unlike many other people, Rose did not fast only on certain days or at specific times.

She appeared to have consumed only Holy Communion.

A crown of flowers disguised as spikes was worn around her head, puncturing the thin, taut skin that covered her skull.

One may argue that Saint Rose’s brief life represented the complete, matured fruit of sixteenth-century Spanish mysticism—pious, mortifying, Christocentric, and theologically orthodox—on the other hand, it was also tragically short.

In today’s society, her self-inflicted injuries would be deemed manifestations of bulimia, mental instability, and self-hatred to the point of sickness.

It is impossible to dismiss Saint Rose’s life as a model for her day since she was plainly driven by love for God and shown such mastery over her natural, physical desires that sanctifying grace as her secret power cannot be dismissed.

Her burial service was conducted at the Cathedral of Lima, with all of the city’s dignitaries in attendance.

She is buried in the same church as Saint Martin de Porres, which is located in the heart of Lima.

She is regarded as a remarkable miracle worker who has been credited with countless physical healings that have continued to this day.

You made a vow to God when you were a kid, dedicating your body and soul to Him. Help all Catholics, especially the young, to commit their lives to God from the beginning of their lives by following your example and praying through your holy intercession.

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