How Did Saint Ignatius Of Antioch Die

Saint Ignatius of Antioch

St. Ignatius of Antioch, also known asIgnatius Theophoros (Greek: “God Bearer”),bishopofAntioch, Syria (now in Turkey), who died in Rome in the year 110, is best known for seven highly regarded letters he wrote while on a trip to Rome as a prisoner condemned to death for his religious beliefs. He is also known for his work as a missionary in the Middle East. The Judaizers, who did not recognize the authority of the New Testament, and thedocetists, who believed that Christ’s sufferings and death were just visible but not genuine, were two factions against whom he appeared to be particularly zealous in his opposition.

Record of his life

Despite the fact that St. Ignatius was a prominent church leader and theologian, he is most remembered for his own writings, which account for nearly all of what is known about him. Although there is little record of his life previous to his incarceration, his letters provide insight into his personality as well as his influence on the Christian faith of his day. He symbolized Christianity as it went through a period of transition from its Jewish beginnings to its incorporation into the Greco-Roman culture.

His support for a hierarchical church structure with a strong focus on episcopal power, his insistence on the true humanity of Christ, and his intense desire to become a martyr are all topics that have sparked significant debate.

  • Eusebius places the occurrence in the year 107 or 108, for reasons that are unknown.
  • The other letters are all anonymous.
  • It is unclear if he was a native of the city; his Greek writing, on the other hand, has an Eastern flavor that is distinctive of that region of the Hellenistic world.
  • Paul, as well as by the tradition associated with St.
  • It’s probable that he was acquainted with St.

Journey to Rome

It was during a persecution of the Antioch church that Ignatius was taken prisoner. He was bound in chains and carried to Troas (in northeastern Asia Minor) by a unit of soldiers before embarking on a ship to Rome. He must have been a well-known figure among Christians by that point. Throughout his journey, he was escorted from town to town by delegations of churches, some of which came from areas other than his intended path. He was stopped at Smyrna (modern-day Zmir, Turkey) for unexplained reasons and was greeted cordially by the local Christians as well as their bishop, St.

  • There, he was also greeted by delegates from the surrounding churches of Ephesus, Magnesia ad Maeandrum, and Tralles, including the bishop, some elders, orpresbyters, and some deacons, who, to the extent that they could, attended to his necessities.
  • At his request, thedeaconBurrus of Ephesus was permitted to accompany him on his journey.
  • From Smyrna, his voyage proceeded to the area of Troas, where he spent a shorter period of time before embarking on his adventure.
  • He did, however, write to the congregations at Philadelphia and Smyrna (these letters were brought by Burrus, who had accompanied him on his journey to Troas), as well as to Bishop Polycarp, who he addressed in a personal letter, and asked him to write to other churches on his behalf.
  • Specifically, in his letter to Polycarp, Ignatius requested that an auxiliary deacon be chosen to send greetings from the church of Smyrna to the people of Antioch, as well as to encourage other churches to follow Smyrna’s example.

Polycarp received no response. It was Polycarp’s student, St. Irenaeus, who died about the year 200–203, who chronicled his death in the Roman arena. The documentation comes to an end here; the remainder is just inference.

The letters: warnings against false teachings

The writings of Ignatius are replete with cautions against false doctrines and false instructors, as well as injunctions to maintain peace and concord by willing subjection in all religious affairs to the clergy, and in particular to the bishop, as they were written. In spite of this, he repeatedly tells his readers that their own church is not a source of anxiety and that his remarks are only motivated by pastoral care. It is only in his letter to the church of Philadelphia that the author suggests that at least some members of the society preferred to segregate, and in a paragraph in his letter to the Smyrnaeans, the author appears to hint that there had been dissidents.

The experiences he experienced as a bishop in Antioch, it’s possible, contributed to Ignatius’s fear of flying.

Ignatius appears to have fought against two types of heretics: (1) Judaizers, who refused to recognize the authority of the New Testament and continued to practice Jewish practices such as keeping the Sabbath; and (2)docetists, who held that Christ suffered and died only in appearance (from the Greekdokein, “to appear”).

  1. According to him, Christ’s Passion, death, and resurrection served as a crucial assurance of “life forever” in the resurrected Christ.
  2. A solid case can be made against the notion that Ignatius had fallen under the influence of some early version of gnosticism, which was a dualistic religion that prioritized salvation by esoteric knowledge (orgnisis) rather than faith (or the doctrine of the Trinity).
  3. Despite this, there is no sign of the fundamental gnostic coupling of good and evil with spirit and matter in his letters or in his writings.
  4. Paul’s antinomy of flesh and spirit, which he dismisses.

St. Ignatius of Antioch (died 110 A.D.)

Saint Ignatius’ martyrdom is shown in this icon. These men and women propagated the gospel of Jesus Christ, defended the Church in apologetic literature, and opposed the numerous heresies that plagued the early decades of Christianity. They are known as the Fathers of the Church. These men, also known as Apostolic Fathers, bore a unique witness to the religion, and some of them died in the manner of a martyr. The Fathers, like Jesus, who referred to Abraham as a spiritual father (Luke 16: 24), and like St.

Many Christians are unfamiliar with the writings of early Church Fathers such as Clement of Rome, Ignatius of Antioch, Polycarp of Smyrna, Justin the Martyr, Irenaeus, Tertullian, Origen, Cyprian of Carthage, Athanasius, Ephraim, Cyril of Jerusalem, Hilary of Poitiers, and Gregory the Great, to name a few.

  • In this section, we’ll talk about the renowned St.
  • In Antioch, St.
  • According to an old document known as Theodoret, he is said to have been ordained by St.
  • Immutab.”, I, iv, 33a, Paris, 1642).
  • The Emperor had ordered the worship of their pagan gods under penalty of death, and he refused to keep mute in the face of this command.
  • During his voyage to Rome and subsequent martyrdom, he composed seven pastoral letters, which are the only ones that have survived.
  • It is unanimously acknowledged by Catholic and Protestant experts that the letters are genuine.

As a result, it is necessary—and this is consistent with your practice—that you do nothing without the bishop’s permission, and that you submit to the presbytery in the same way that we are subject to the Apostles of Jesus Christ our hope, in whom we will be found if we live in Him.” 2nd Chapter of the Letter to the Trallians (110 A.D.) “Everybody should regard the deacons as they would Jesus Christ, just as they should respect the bishop as a figure of the Father, and the presbyters as a type of God’s council and the Apostles’ college, among other things.

It cannot be considered a church unless it possesses these characteristics.” Chapter 4 of the Letter to the Romans “I am writing to all of the churches, and I implore them to remember that I am voluntarily dying for the love of God, if only you do not intervene.

Allow me to be devoured by the creatures, as this is my only means of getting closer to God.

The same is true for those who repent and join together in the unity of the Church.

Take care, then, to use only one Eucharist, so that whatever you do is in accordance with God: for there is only one Flesh of our Lord Jesus Christ, and only one cup in the union of His Blood; only one altar, just as there is only one bishop with the presbytery and my fellow servants, the deacons; and only one altar, just as there is only one bishop with the presbytery and my fellow servants, the deacons.” Chapter 6 of the Letter to the Smyrnaeans (110 A.D.) “Observe the people who hold heterodox views on the grace of Jesus Christ, which has been extended to us, and consider how their views are at odds with the mind of God.They abstain from the Eucharist and from prayer because they do not confess that the Eucharist is the Flesh of our Savior Jesus Christ, Flesh which suffered for our sins and which the Father, in His goodness, raised up again.

Those who refuse to acknowledge God’s gift are perishing in their disagreements.” Chapter 8: “Let only that Eucharist be considered authentic, which is celebrated under the supervision of the bishop or the person to whom he has entrusted it.”

Ignatius of Antioch Faced Wild Beasts

You’ve probably seen photographs of Christians in the arena, facing up against a pack of lions. Ignatius, the bishop of Antioch, was one of the martyrs who died at the hands of the savage animals. On his way back from Asia Minor, Trajan detained Ignatius, who had been on the run since his capture. When the bishop publicly professed his faith in Christ, the emperor imprisoned him in Rome and sentenced him to death. When Ignatius came, the public spectacles were about to come to an end. He was rushed to the arena and promptly put to the mercy of two vicious lions, who devoured him in seconds.

  1. At no point did he attempt to flee from his ignominious execution.
  2. There has to be a rationale for such an improbable attitude, right?
  3. I tolerate anything that I may have to undergo in his company because he who has become a perfect man helps me in my weakness.” What a frame of mind!
  4. “We must not just be labeled Christians, but we must also be Christians,” he had said in an earlier letter.
  5. His name is important since he was a follower of the apostle, John the Baptist.
  6. Ignatius was the first bishop whose writings refer to the church as “catholic,” which means “universal.” He was also the first to refer to the church as “universal.” Bibliography:
  1. Kurt Aland contributed to this narrative, which was adapted from an earlier Christian History Institute report. Saints and sinners
  2. Personalities and ideas in the early Christian community. Will Durant’s Caesar and Christ was published by Fortress Press in Philadelphia in 1970. The Story of Christianity, by Justo L. González, New York: Simon & Schuster, 1944
  3. González, Justo L. Peabody The Prince Press, Boston, Massachusetts, 2001
  4. St. Ignatius of Loyola, St. Ignatius of Loyola, St. Ignatius of Loyola, St. The Christian Church, according to the Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church. F. L. Cross and E. A. Livingstone collaborated on the editing of this volume. Oxford University Press, 1997
  5. A number of encyclopedia and online entries
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The most recent update was made in April of 2007.

Ignatius of Antioch

Sign up for Christianity Today and you’ll gain instant access to back issues of Christian History! “Now I’m starting to learn how to be a disciple. Allow fire and the cross, herds of animals, shattered bones, dismemberment, and other calamities to fall upon me as long as I am able to reach Jesus Christ.” Ignatius was on his way to the grave. He was well aware of it. He was looking forward to it. As far as he was concerned, the only thing that could go wrong was interfering Christians.

Timeline

4 B.C. Birth of Jesus
14 Death of Augustus
30 Crucifixion of Jesus; Pentecost
35 Ignatius born
107 Ignatius dies
120 Papias is bishop of Hierapolis

“I am afraid that your charity may come back to haunt me,” he wrote to Roman Christians who were trying to release him. “It’s possible that you’ll be able to accomplish your goals. However, if you do not take my plea into consideration, it will be extremely impossible for me to reach God.” Ignatius’ ultimate purpose was to resemble “our God Jesus Christ” in death, and this was his true motivation. Christian leaders who were truly committed to doing something should pray that he would remain loyal to his word.

  1. However, if you allow yourself to be persuaded by the affection with which you grasp my body, I will be reduced to nothing more than a human voice once more.” We only know that Ignatius sincerely want to die, and that is about all we know about his martyrdom.
  2. As the second (or third) bishop of Antioch, one of the most significant churches in the world at the time, he was unquestionably one of the most renowned Christians of the period, having succeeded the apostles as the second (or third) bishop.
  3. Against the Ebionites, he sent a harsh letter to the Magnesian church (near Ephesus), who insisted that Jewish laws be observed at all times.
  4. He said that anyone who believed such foolishness as Christ simply appeared to suffer could not legitimately be referred to as a martyr.
  5. He visited with leaders of local churches at practically every stop, and he wrote seven letters throughout the course of the journey, with the assistance of a secretary.
  6. Following Jesus Christ, he wrote to Polycarp’s church in Smyrna, saying, “Follow, all of you, the bishop, as Jesus Christ followed the Father” (now Izmir, Turkey).
  7. It is not permissible to baptize or conduct a love-feast without the permission of the bishop, and “In his letter to Smyrna, he went on to say more.

(He was also the first person outside of the New Testament to refer to Jesus’ virgin birth as a historical fact.) History has forgotten the specifics of Ignatius’ death, but not his resolve to make his life meaningful: “I want my life to mean something.” “Now I’m starting to learn how to be a disciple.

Allow fire and the cross, herds of animals, shattered bones, dismemberment, and other calamities to fall upon me as long as I am able to reach Jesus Christ.”

Saint Ignatius of Antioch

The Life and Times of Saint Ignatius of Antioch Ignatius, who was born in Syria, turned to Christianity and eventually rose to the position of bishop of Antioch. In the year 107, Emperor Trajan paid a visit to Antioch, where he compelled the Christians to choose between death and apostasy or face execution. He refused to reject Christ and was thus sentenced to death in the city of Rome as a result of his defiance. Ignatius is well known for the seven letters he composed while traveling from Antioch to Rome, which are still in existence today.

  • He cautions them of erroneous beliefs while also supplying them with the solid realities of the Christian faith to stand on.
  • In his farewell letter, Jesus asks the Christians in Rome not to attempt to prevent his death by martyrdom.
  • It is I, the wheat of the Lord, who asks that I be crushed into flour by the teeth of the animals in order to be made into the immaculate bread of Christ.” In the Circus Maximus, Ignatius faced the lions with courage.
  • Even more remarkable was his desire to die as a martyr rather than renounce Jesus Christ.
  • He understood the cost of devotion and would not turn away from Christ, even if it meant risking his own life.

St. Ignatius of Antioch

The writings of the Christian bishop St. Ignatius of Antioch (who died around 115 AD) are a valuable source of information about the early Church. A persecution of Christians occurred at Antioch, Syria, while Ignatius served as the overseer (bishop) of the Christians in the city during the reign of Trajan the Apostate. The official gods were not acknowledged by Ignatius when he was apprehended; as a result, he was put to death in the amphitheater of Rome, despite the fact that he did not have citizenship in the city.

  • The letters he sent to these organizations before his death illustrate many of the ideas of Christianity in the early second century.
  • He regarded the pastor of the community, the bishop, as the spiritual leader who would bring the people together in faith.
  • Baptism or holding a love-feast are both prohibited when done without the permission of the bishops.
  • Ignatius was believed that Christian baptism resulted in the birth of a new life in Christ, and that this life was eternal unless it was hindered by the sin of the believer.
  • He did so in order to gain more time with Christ.
  • “Allow me to be abandoned to the wild creatures, for it is only through them that I may reach God.
  • Some of Ignatius’ language had a ring to it that reminded me of the language of the Greek mystery cults.
  • Ignatius was a wise and outspoken leader who was willing to die rather than compromise his religious convictions.

According to the Roman authorities, he was a disruptive influence in an empire that saw the pagan religious practices of the city-state of Rome as a politically uniting force. In the eyes of many Christians, Ignatius of Antioch was a founding father of the church.

Further Reading on St. Ignatius of Antioch

The most recent English translation of Ignatius’ writings may be found in James A. Kleist’s The Epistles of St. Clement of Rome and St. Ignatius of Antioch, edited by James A. Kleist (1946). Virgina Corwin’s St. Ignatius and Christianity in Antioch (published in 1960) provides an in-depth examination of his life, times and thinking. It is important to read Cyril Charles Richardson’s The Christianity of Ignatius of Antioch (1935), which provides an overview of the concepts articulated by Ignatius in his letters.

Ignatius of Antioch

The feast day is on October 17th. Pre-Congregational period was canonized. Isn’t it interesting to consider who was the first individual to describe the society that Jesus founded as the “Catholic Church”? That was the saint Ignatius of Antioch who said it. It was his way of conveying the message that the Church was accessible to anybody who desired to follow Jesus as a follower. Given that Ignatius lived so many centuries ago, we know relatively little about his early years. We know he was born in the year 50 and died sometime around the year 108, according to tradition.

  • Ignatius took over as bishop in his place.
  • In the year 107, the ruthless Emperor Trajan ordered Bishop Ignatius to publicly denounce our religion, which he did.
  • In Antioch, Trajan sentenced him to death by being devoured by lions in the Colosseum in Rome, which was far away from his home.
  • Ten troops were assigned to protect him during the lengthy journey.
  • Members of the Church were urged in the letters to be faithful to the Lord and to adhere to the teachings of their respective bishops.
  • The letters of Ignatius have survived the ages as a historical record.
  • As Ignatius and his guards made their way to Rome, they were hailed at several points along the way by the local bishop and a large number of members of the Christian community who had come to pay tribute to him.
  • In the face of death, Ignatius was not terrified.
  • Permit me to become prey for the wild creatures, for they are my gateway to God.” Ignatius of Antioch is revered as a saint by the Catholic Church.

Prayers to Saint Ignatius can be sent to him, and we might ask him to assist us in growing in the faith that has been passed down to us from the Apostles.

St. Ignatius of Antioch

October 17 is celebrated as Saint Ignatius of Antioch Day by the Roman Catholic Church, who was a Church Father, bishop and martyr who lived in the first century AD. His works speak to the sacramental and hierarchical structure of the Church from its earliest days. His memory is commemorated on December 20 by Eastern Catholics and Eastern Orthodox Christians. When asked about St. Ignatius of Antioch at a public audience in 2007, Pope Benedict XVI stated that “no other Church Father has voiced the hunger for unity with Christ and for life in him with the intensity that Ignatius did.” He said in his writings that “one senses the freshness of faith of that age which had yet been acquainted with the Apostles.” “It is possible to sense the fervent love of a saint in these letters as well.” Having been born in Syria somewhere around the first century A.D., Ignatius is supposed to have been personally trained by the Apostle Saint John, who also instructed another future martyr, Saint Polycarp, at the time of his death.

  1. It was approximately the year 70 that St.
  2. The city of Antioch had a significant part in the life of the early Church despite the fact that St.
  3. It was a major city in the Roman Empire, and it was also the site where those who believed in Jesus’ teachings and his resurrection were first referred to as “Christians.” It is now located in the modern-day country of Turkey.
  4. Domitian was the first of the Roman emperors to proclaim his divinity by adopting the title “Lord and God,” and anyone who refused to worship the emperor under this title risked execution.
  5. Following Domitian’s assassination in the year 96, his successor Nerva reigned for just a short time before being succeeded by the Emperor Trajan.
  6. It was during his reign that Ignatius was tried and condemned for his Christian witness, and he was transported from Syria to Rome in order to be executed.
  7. Ignatius’ writings were filled with fervor as he emphasized the need of Church unity, the perils of heresy, and the transcendent value of the Eucharist as the “medicine of immortality” in the lives of those who received it.
  8. When reading Ignatius’ writings, one of the most remarkable elements is his ardent embracing of martyrdom as a way of attaining connection with God and eternal life.
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“Let fire and the cross come upon me; let the hordes of wild beasts come upon me; let tearings, breakings, and dislocations of bones come upon me; let cutting off of members come upon me; let shatterings of the whole body come upon me; and let all the dreadful torments of the devil come upon me: only let me attain to Jesus Christ.” “Let fire and the cross come upon me; let the hordes of wild beasts During his final public appearance, St.

Ignatius of Antioch bore witness to Christ in Rome’s Flavian Amphitheater, where he was mauled to death by a pack of hungry lions.

“I must be pounded to a powder by the fangs of these creatures in order to become the pure bread of Christ.” Soon after his death, which occurred about the year 107, his memory was cherished, and his bones were worshipped.

Saint Ignatius Of Antioch

The writings of the Christian bishop St. Ignatius of Antioch (who died around 115 AD) are a valuable source of information about the early Church. A persecution of Christians occurred at Antioch, Syria, while Ignatius served as the overseer (bishop) of the Christians in the city during the reign of Trajan the Apostate. The official gods were not acknowledged by Ignatius when he was apprehended; as a result, he was put to death in the amphitheater of Rome, despite the fact that he did not have citizenship in the city.

  1. The letters he sent to these organizations before his death illustrate many of the ideas of Christianity in the early second century.
  2. He regarded the pastor of the community, the bishop, as the spiritual leader who would bring the people together in faith.
  3. Baptism or holding a love-feast are both prohibited when done without the permission of the bishops.
  4. Ignatius was believed that Christian baptism resulted in the birth of a new life in Christ, and that this life was eternal unless it was hindered by the sin of the believer.
  5. He stated that if the animals in the amphitheater did not appear to be hungry, he would encourage them to continue.
  6. I am God’s wheat, and I am being ground by wild beasts so that I may be proven to be the pure bread of Christ, says the prophet Isaiah “He addressed his letter to the Christians in Rome.

“The mystery” of Christ’s body and blood, he added, and he described the Eucharist as “the medicine of immortality and the antidote against death.” He said that the Eucharist is a spiritual sustenance that nourishes the one who receives it and assists him in his journey towards everlasting life.

According to the Roman authorities, he was a disruptive influence in an empire that saw the pagan religious practices of the city-state of Rome as a politically uniting force.

Further Reading

The most recent English translation of Ignatius’ writings may be found in James A. Kleist’s The Epistles of St. Clement of Rome and St. Ignatius of Antioch, edited by James A. Kleist (1946). Virgina Corwin’s St.

Ignatius and Christianity in Antioch (published in 1960) provides an in-depth examination of his life, times and thinking. The book The Christianity of Ignatius of Antioch (1935) by Cyril Charles Richardson is extremely useful in comprehending the views conveyed by Ignatius in his letters.

Who was Ignatius of Antioch? Everything You Need to Know

Lists of items to consider: Lists of items to consider: Ignatius of Antioch was a Christian author and bishop of the city of Antioch in the first century AD. Ignatius Theophorus, Ignatius Nurono, and Ignatius Theophorus were some of his other names. He is considered one of the Apostolic Fathers and is one of the “three chiefs,” together with Pope Clement I and Polycarp, who are known as the “three chiefs.” A series of letters was written by him while en route to Rome, where he was to be killed for refusing to renounce his Christian beliefs in a harsh manner.

  • The letters he composed while on his final voyage are still regarded to be priceless artifacts in Christian history.
  • These letters covered a variety of issues, including ecclesiology, the sacraments, and the duty of bishops among others.
  • It is a well-known truth that Ignatius possessed all of the characteristics necessary to serve as an outstanding pastor.
  • Lists of items to consider: Lists of things to do: Life Ignatius of Antioch was born in Syria in 35 AD, about five years after the death of Jesus Christ, and was the first bishop of Antioch.
  • We think that Ignatius came to Christianity when he was a very small child.
  • Continue reading farther down this page.
  • Ignatius of Antioch is observed on the 17th of October in Antioch.

However, between the 12th century and 1969, the feast was celebrated on the first of February, which was the day designated by the Roman calendar as the day of the feast.

In AD 69, Ignatius of Antioch was consecrated as a bishop by the first pope, Apostle Peter, who was the first pope.

His pupils heard him teach orthopraxy, or the proper practice of medicine.

He also refused to worship the gods of the Romans.

Ignatius of Antioch traveled from Antioch to Smyrna, passing via Magnesia, Tralles, and Ephesus on his way.

After passing through the city of Philippi, he continued his journey to Rome from there.

It was on this journey that he wrote the seven letters that have become famous.

All of these letters essentially pleaded with Christians to be faithful to God.

In his writings, he merely attempted to clarify what he regarded to be the fundamental truths of Christianity.

He likewise died a martyr’s death after being burnt at the stake, according to tradition.

He died a martyr’s death in front of hundreds of onlookers on the streets of Rome.

Emperor Theodosius ordered the transfer of the relics to Tychaeum.

Tychaeum, which was also named Temple of Tyche, was turned into a church and dedicated to Ignatius. In AD 637, the bones were again moved to the Basilica di San Clemente in Rome. Trivia Ignatius was the first person to use the term ‘Catholic’ to designate the entire church.

Telling them apart: St. Ignatius of Antioch vs St. Ignatius of Loyola

St. Ignatius of Loyola, a Spanish saint who is well-known throughout the world, owing primarily to the vast spread of his spiritual children – the Jesuits, and their role as educators, who have helped shape the minds and hearts of generations of Catholics all over the world, will be commemorated on March 31. But did you know that there was another St. Ignatius who lived hundreds of years before him? You may not be aware that the real Ignatius of Loyola’s given name wasn’t even Ignatius. Continue reading to put your knowledge to the test and learn more!

Ignatius of Antioch (died early 2nd century AD)

During a time of persecution, this Ignatius was one of the first Bishops of Antioch, guiding the young Christian community there. But, other from the fact that he died at Rome as a martyr for the Christian faith, we know virtually little else about him. We have no information about his birth date or location. Not only that, but we don’t even know when he died. Several dates have been proposed as the date of his martyrdom, which may be found by searching for him online. Tradition has it that he was beheaded during a persecution of Christians under the time of the Roman Emperor Trajan, who reigned from 98 AD to 117 AD.

  • But even that is not known with perfect clarity at this point.
  • Moreover, they reveal more about the Church at the time of their composition (which is, after all, the primary reason for their importance) than they do about the man who wrote them.
  • On his journey through Asia Minor, he came across Christian communities anxious to meet him and encourage him, just as he was eager to visit them and encourage them.
  • From here, he penned his letters to the Christian congregations in Ephesus, Magnesia, and Tralles, all of which were located nearby.
  • He pleaded with them to put an end to their efforts.
  • Following his departure from Smyrna, he wrote three further letters, two of which were sent to the congregations of Philadelphia and Smyrna, and one which was addressed to his friend Polycarp.
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Consider that the “New Testament” as we know it did not exist until the 4th century, and that these letters are a valuable piece of our history, revealing a continuity between the Apostles and their most immediate successors, as well as the antiquity of some of our traditions that do not appear in the Gospels or the Epistles, among other things.

  • They also demonstrate the hierarchical character of the church, as well as the primacy of the Bishop of Rome, in which the power of the bishops was understood.
  • The fact that you belong to a Church with such a lengthy history is both intriguing and aggravating, depending on your point of view, as you will see below.
  • According to Ignatius himself, he was sentenced to be devoured by wild creatures, and it is through this that his martyrdom has been preserved in legend and documented by succeeding generations since.
  • His feast day is celebrated on October 17.
  • It is I who am the grain of God, and it is I who must be ground by the teeth of the wild animals in order to become the clean bread of Christ.

– In the Epistle of Ignatius to the Romans, Ignatius of Antioch is depicted in a painting by Cesare Fracanzano, a painter of the Neapolitan School of Painting who lived in the 17th century (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556)

The famed Jesuit founder Ignatius of Loyola, who is at the other end of the spectrum in terms of how much we know about his life and the evidence that supports it, is at the other end of the spectrum in terms of how much we know about his life and evidence that supports it. The fact that his given name wasn’t even Ignatius startled me a little. Actually, it’s kind of true — but not really. The name Igo was given to him during baptism, and I’d always believed that this was a Spanish variant of Ignatius (along with Ignacio), but this is not the case.

  • Enecus if you chose to refer to him by that name.
  • But let’s start at the beginning of the process.
  • He was named after the patron saint of the city.
  • Having entered the army at the age of seventeen, he eagerly immersed himself in the life of a well-born soldier of money – a life that consisted mostly of parties, good clothing, ladies, gambling, and, occasionally, duels.
  • During the Battle of Pamplona, a cannonball struck igo in the legs, fracturing his right shin and causing him to lose consciousness.
  • However, something else occurred in his life at that moment.
  • Perhaps not as well-known as St.

Augustine and St.

Despite the fact that he was healing from his awful wound in Loyola Castle for several months, igo continued to dream of fame and glory.

He was expected to find more of the same romantic novels and epics that had fueled his adolescent aspirations, but was disappointed.

As a result, he read them.

Instead of feeling depressed when the dream ended, he began to feel a lasting sense of serenity and happiness.

Following his return to Spain, he resumed his schooling at the age of 33; nevertheless, unforeseen events forced him to leave the country and complete his studies at the University of Paris.

In Paris, he collected a group of six young men around himself, whom he educated in prayer and the spiritual procedures he had developed for himself – the famousSpiritual Exercises – that would become famed around the world.

Despite the fact that, like many other founders before and after him, Ignatius had no intention of founding a religious order, in 1540, Pope Paul III approved his new association of priests dedicated to apostolic works (primarily missionary work, but later education and social justice as well) under the name of the Society of Jesus, and Ignatius was elected its first Superior General.

  • Despite the fact that the other members of the order were dispatched all over the world in a short period of time, Ignatius himself remained in Rome for the duration of his life.
  • Despite the fact that the Society was still in its infancy at the time of Ignatius’ death, it already had around 1,000 members spread throughout ten provinces.
  • However, the Society of Jesus is today the greatest religious order in the Catholic Church, whether it is male or female, with over 15,000 members spread among 76 provinces on six continents.
  • What do you think about that as a legacy?
  • Ignatius of Loyola is celebrated on July 31.

Ad maiorem Dei gloriam (For the greater glory of God) is the slogan of the Society of Jesus, which was founded by Saint Ignatius of Loyola in 1541. Saint Ignatius of Loyola is seen in the painting Ad maiorem Dei gloriam by Peter Paul Rubens. (Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons)

St. Ignatius of Antioch – Saints & Angels

“Death in Christ Jesus is preferable than control over the farthest reaches of the planet for me. The one and only aim of my search is the person who died in our place. My one and only desire is to be with Him who died for our sakes.” This pious Bishop was falsely put to death in the year 107, during the reign of the ruthless Emperor Trajan, for refusing to forsake his Christian beliefs. He was carried under escort to Rome, where he was to be savagely consumed by wild creatures in front of a large audience as part of a public display.

This disciple of the beloved Disciple John was consecrated Bishop by the Apostle Peter, the first Pope, in the year 69.

The early Christians regarded him as a holy man who was much loved by them, and he always took extra care to protect “orthodoxy” (correct teaching) and “orthopraxy” (right practice) among their ranks.

He was carried under escort to Rome, where he was to be savagely consumed by wild creatures in front of a large audience as part of a public display.

The time he had was put to good use by him, who sent seven letters of encouragement, teaching, and inspiration to the Christians in those towns and villages.

The letters’ substance addressed the Church’s hierarchy and organizational structure, as well as the core of the true Christian faith.

Through these writings, we are linked to the early Church and the unbroken, unambiguous teaching of the Apostles, which was revealed to them directly by the Lord Jesus Christ himself.

Having poured his blood in holy martyrdom as a witness to Jesus Christ was the climax of a life spent in conformity to Christ.

In the year 107, he was martyred in the name of Christ.

At long last, I’ve decided to become his follower.

Fire, the cross, battles with wild beasts, the tearing of bones, the mangling of limbs—let them all come to me, so long as I am on my way to Jesus Christ and not away from him.

I’m looking for him who died for us, and I’m falling in love with him who rose again for us.” Bishop Ignatius was not frightened by the prospect of death.

He accompanied the Lord Jesus into the Garden of Gethsemane, knowing that he would rise with Him in the Resurrection of Christ.

I am God’s wheat, and I will be crushed to a powder by the teeth of animals in order to be transformed into the pure bread of Christ.” With these words, the beauty of this Eucharistic symbolism is revealed, as is the depth of a mystic’s theology.

In order to follow in the footsteps of the Apostles, he exhorted them to constantly listen to their respective Bishops.

In anticipation of this occurrence, he composed the following words of inspiration: St.

This letter is being sent to all of the churches in order to make it known that I am willing to die for God if only you would not stand in my way.

Allow me to become food for the wild creatures, as they are my only means of reaching God.

Please pray to Christ on my behalf so that the animals will be the way by which I will be offered up as a sacrifice to God.

Death in Christ Jesus is preferable than dominion over the farthest reaches of the planet for me.

My one and only desire is to be with Him who died for our sakes.

Please accept my apologies, my brothers.

My deepest desire is to be a part of God’s family.

Keep your materialistic attempts at luring me away from my spiritual path.

Only until I go there will I be able to function completely as a human being.

If you have him in your heart, you will be able to comprehend what I am trying to convey.

The ruler of this world is trying to seize control of me and to subvert my will, which is focused on God’s purposes.

As long as you are in love with this world, you should refrain from speaking about Jesus Christ.

And, if I should happen to run into you, and if I should ask you to intervene on my behalf, do not take anything I say at face value.

Because, despite the fact that I am still alive as I write to you, my true wish is to die.

Instead, I have live water within me that calls out to me from deep within: “Come to the Father.” My enjoyment of perishable foods and the pleasures of this life has waned with time.

In any case, I am no longer willing to live a merely human existence, and you have the power to make my dream come true if you so want.

For the sake of simplicity, here is my request: trust what I am telling you.

Only truth can come from the lips of the one who has really uttered the Father’s words.

I have not written to you as a normal man might, but rather as one who understands God’s thoughts and intentions. If I am sentenced to suffer, I will consider it as a positive indication that you desire me well. If my case is postponed, I can only conclude that you have ill will against me.”

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