How Did Saint Clare Of Assisi Die

Saint Clare of Assisi

Saint Clare of Assisi was an Italian saint who was one of the earliest followers of Saint Francis of Assisi. She is best known as the founder of the Order of Poor Ladies.

Who Was Saint Clare of Assisi?

Despite the fact that she was born into a wealthy Italian family, Saint Clare of Assisi chose a life of devotion and poverty rather than continuing her privileged upbringing. Francis of Assisi’s comments inspired Clare to flee from her family and join him at Assisi, where she eventually founded her own religious order. The group became well-known for their austere and devoted way of life, as well as the strength of their prayers, which are credited with sparing Assisi from invasion on two separate occasions.

Clare died in 1253 and was canonized by Pope Alexander IV two years later, in 1254.

Early Years

Clare was born in 1193 in Assisi, Italy, to affluent parents. She was taught to read and write as well as to spin yarn and perform embroidery by her mother, who was a skilled needleworker. Despite her rich surroundings (she lived in a palace), Clare showed little interest in them, and, motivated by her mother’s religious zeal, she committed her life to God at an early age. Clare was born into a family of devout believers. She also demonstrated early on that she was called to serve the underprivileged by setting aside food from her family’s dinner table to distribute to the homeless on the streets.

Francis of Assisi’s Influential Visit

When Clare was eighteen years old, Francis of Assisi came to Assisi to preach at the church of San Giorgio. After being moved by his comments, Clare approached Francis and begged him to assist her in committing her life to God, which he agreed to do. Claire’s parents picked a wealthy young man for her to marry the following year (1211), but she flatly rejected, fleeing shortly thereafter to the Porziuncola Chapel, where Francis welcomed her. It was on March 20, 1212, that she professed her faith and dedicated her life to God, and it was at that moment that the Second Order of Saint Francis was officially established.

A Life of God

Clare’s sister Agnes soon joined her, and the three of them relocated to the Church of San Damiano, which Francis had recently renovated. Not long after, additional women joined them, and the residents of San Damiano, who were already well-known for their austere way of life, became known as the “Poor Ladies.” (Originally known as the Order of San Damiano, the Order of Saint Clare would be renamed the Order of Saint Clare ten years following Clare’s death.) Clare was appointed abbess of San Damiano in 1216, and, while spending her days doing manual labor and praying, she began devoting a significant portion of her time to converting the order’s governing rule (which had been established by the Pope) from one based on the Benedictine spirit to one based on the newly established Franciscan rule, which she accomplished in 1221.

(On the eve of Clare’s death, Pope Innocent IV granted her request, which took two days.) The order became well-known for its life of severe poverty and its dedication to prayer, which Clare utilized to achieve worldly achievements, including being credited with rescuing the city of Assisi on two separate occasions.

In the second occasion, the city of Assisi came under attack once more.

Clare provided care for Francis near the end of his life and was present with him when he died in 1226, according to legend.

Clare was canonized by Pope Alexander IV in August 1255, and now the Order of Saint Clare has more than 20,000 sisters worldwide, with members from more than 70 countries.

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Clare of Assisi – Wikipedia

SaintClare of AssisiO.S.C.
Detail depicting Saint Clare from afresco(c. 1320) bySimone Martiniin theLower basilica of San Francesco,Assisi
Virgin,MysticandReligiousFoundress of the Order of Poor Ladies and the Monastic Order for Women in the Franciscan Order
Born Chiara Offreduccio 16 July 1194Assisi,Duchy of Spoleto,Holy Roman Empire
Died 11 August 1253 (aged 59)Assisi,Papal States
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church,Anglican Communion,Lutheran Church
Canonized 26 September 1255,RomebyPope Alexander IV
Majorshrine Basilica of Saint Clare,Assisi
Feast 11 August (1970 to date), 12 August (1255–1969)
Attributes Monstrance,pyx,lamp,habit of the Poor Clares
Patronage Eye disease, goldsmiths, laundry, television, bicycle messengers, good weather, needleworkers, remote viewing, extrasensory perception;Santa Clara, California;Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico;Obando, Bulacan, Philippines

Clare of Assisi (bornChiara Offreduccio; 16 July 1194 – 11 August 1253) was anItalian saint and one of the earliest followers ofFrancis of Assisi. She was also known as Clare of Assisi, Clare of Assisi, and Clare of Assisi. She created the Order of Poor Ladies, a monastic religious order for women in the Franciscan tradition, and penned the Order’s Rule of Life, which is believed to be the first set of monastic principles published by a woman in recorded history. As a result of her death, the order she created was renamed in her honor, becoming the Order of Saint Clare, which is more widely known as the Poor Clares nowadays.

Life

Clare was born in Assisiduring the High Middle Ages, the oldest daughter of Favaroneor Favorino Sciffi, Count of Sasso-Rosso and his wife Ortolana. Clare was the eldest daughter of Favaroneor Favorino Sciffi, Count of Sasso-Rosso and his wife Ortolana. Clare’s father was said to be a wealthy representative of an ancient Roman family who possessed a huge mansion in Assisi as well as a castle on the slopes of Mount Subasio, according to tradition. Her ancestors belonged to the noble family of the Fiumi, and Ortolana was a religious woman who had traveled on pilgrimages to places such as Rome, Santiago de Compostela, and the Holy Land.

  • Clare had a strong devotion to prayer as a kid.
  • After hearing Francis preach at the church of San Giorgio in Assisi during a Lenten service, she approached him and requested him to assist her in living in accordance with the teachings of Jesus Christ.
  • Her hair was chopped and she switched her opulent gown for a simple robe and veil while she was there.
  • Clare was placed in the monastery of the Benedictine nuns of San Paulo, which is located near Bastia.
  • She clung to the altar of the church and pushed her veil away, revealing her short hair below.
  • Clare was sent to Sant’ Angelo in Panzo, another Benedictine monastery on one of the sides of Subasio, a few days later by Francis in order to provide her with the increased seclusion she needed.
  • This was the case until a tiny apartment was constructed for them near the church of San Damiano, which Francis had rebuilt a few years before.

When Clare founded her new religious order at San Damiano, it was called as the “Order of Poor Ladies of San Damiano,” and it remained there until Clare’s death.

Given the prestige of Clare’s monastery, Hugolino desired San Damiano to be included in the new order he was establishing.

The Order of Saint Clare was established in 1263, only ten years after Clare’s death, and was recognized as such until the present day.

So the Pope awarded them a privilege known as thePrivilegium Pauperitatis, which means that no one may compel them to take any possession.

Manual labor and prayer were the staples of their existence.

For a brief period of time, Francis himself presided over the organization.

Clare had more authority to lead the order as abbess than she did as prioress, but she was still required to follow the orders of the priest who was in charge of the community.

Clare made a concerted effort to emulate Francis’ virtues and way of life, to the point where she was sometimes referred to asalter Franciscus, or “another Francis.” Moreover, she played an important role in encouraging and assisting Francis, whom she regarded as a spiritual father figure, and she was responsible for caring for him throughout his final illness.

This joyous poverty in imitation of Christ is evident in Clare’s rule for her community as well as her four letters to Agnes of Prague, which reflect her Franciscan theology of joyful poverty in imitation of Christ.

Clare prayed to Christ, who was present in the Blessed Sacrament, and she was successful in defending both targets.

Clare suffered from poor health for a long period of time in her later years. She died on August 11, 1253, when she was 59 years old. “Blessed be You, O God, for having created me,” she is said to have said before passing away.

Death

Clare’s rule was approved by Pope Innocent IV in the papal bullSolet annuere, which was issued on August 9, 1253, two days before Clare’s death. Clare’s rule was the governing rule for Clare’s Order of Poor Ladies. In the meanwhile, her bones were deposited at the chapel of San Giorgio while a church to house her ashes was being built. On the day of her funeral, Pope Innocent IV ordered that the friars perform an Office for the Virgin Saints rather than an Office for the Dead, as had been customary.

  1. Several advisors advised Pope Innocent against having the Office for the Virgin Saints conducted during Clare’s burial.
  2. The most outspoken of these counselors was Cardinal Raynaldus, who would go on to become Pope Alexander IV, who would canonize Clare in two years’ time after his death.
  3. While the entire procedure took two years, the evaluation of Clare’s miracles was completed in just six short days.
  4. Clare’s bones were brought to the basilica on 3 October 1260, when the basilica’s construction was completed, and they were buried beneath the high altar beneath the basilica’s main altar.
  5. Clare’s relics were relocated to a newly constructed shrine in the crypt of the Basilica of Saint Clare in 1872, 600 years after her death.

Legacy

After being canonized by Pope Alexander IV on September 26, 1255, her feast day was immediately inserted into the General Roman Calendar for celebration on August 12, the day after her death, because the day before she died, August 11th, had already been assigned to Saints Tiburtius and Susanna, two 3rd-century martyrs from Rome. The feast was designated as a Double (as in the Tridentine Calendar) or, in the nomenclature of 1960, as a Third-Class Feast (as in the ancient Roman calendar) (as in theGeneral Roman Calendar of 1960).

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It was a year after Clare’s canonization that construction of the Basilica di Santa Chiara began, and her bones were transported to the basilica on 3 October 1260 from the church of St George, which was also in Assisi.

As a reminder of the time she repelled the invading soldiers of Frederick II at the gates of her convent by displaying the Blessed Sacrament and kneeling in prayer, Clare is frequently depicted carrying a amonstrance or apyx in art, which is a commemoration of the occasion when she repelled the invading soldiers of Frederick II at the gates of her convent.

  1. It is customary to make contributions of eggs to the Poor Clares in exchange for their intercessions for good weather, especially at weddings.
  2. In the words of the Filipino author Alejandro Roces, the tradition originated as a result of Clare’s given name.
  3. There are several sites, such as churches, convents, schools, hospitals, townships, and counties, that are named after Saint Clare, Santa Clara, or other versions of her name.
  4. As a result, she was given the names of the Saint Clair River, St.
  5. Clair County, Michigan, among other things.
  6. The Santa Clara River in southern California is hundreds of miles to the south and is the source of the name of the adjacent city ofSanta Clarita.
  7. The Santa Clara Feast Day is observed yearly on August 12 at Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico, in observance of the feast day as it was observed before to the 1969 calendar change.
  8. The ship known asNia, which made two trips to Cuba, was renamedSanta Clara after the city of Santa Clara in Spain.

Clare of Assisi is commemorated in the Church of England with a Lesser Festival on August 11, according to the official website.

See also

  1. Paschal Robinson’s abcdRobinson, Paschal (1908). “St. Clare of Assisi,” says the narrator. Frances Teresa and Regis J. Armstrong wrote The Catholic Encyclopedia, which was published by the Robert Appleton Company in New York in 1944. (2009). “The Rule of St Clare,” as it is known. Joy in All Things: A Franciscan Companion is a book written by Franciscan monks to help people find joy in all things (2nd ed.). pp. 48–67. ISBN 978-1-85311-747-3. Canterbury Press. p. 48. 16th of August, 2020
  2. Retrieved 16th of August, 2020
  3. Costanzo Natali and Cristina Donno are the authors of this work. “Santa Chiara d’Assisi: The Story of Her Life” (in Italian). Cappuccini attended the Conferenza Italiana Ministri Provinciali Cappuccini. abcFoley, Leonard, p. 34–35
  4. Bartoli, p. 34–35
  5. AbcFoley, Leonard, p. 34–35
  6. (revised by McCloskey, Pat). The Saint of the Day is “Saint Clare of Assisi,” according to Franciscan Media
  7. AbcdePirl, Paolo O. (1997). “St. Clare.” It was my first time reading a book of saints. pp. 178–179.ISBN971-91595-4-5
  8. Alberzoni, Maria Pia.Clare of Assisi and the Poor Sisters in the Thirteenth Century.ISBN971-91595-4-5
  9. Alberzoni, Maria Pia.Clare of Assisi St. Bonaventure, NY: Franciscan Institute, 2004
  10. Bartoli, p. 92ff
  11. Bartoli, p. 95
  12. Bartoli, p. 96
  13. Bartoli, p. 171ff
  14. Franceschini, Ezio (July–August 1953). St. Bonaventure, NY: Franciscan Institute, 2004
  15. Bartoli, In “I Due Assalti dei Saraceni a S. Damiano e ad Assisi,” the Saraceni brothers travel to S. Damiano and Assisi. 289–306.JSTOR25820472
  16. Bartoli
  17. Pattenden, Miles
  18. (April 2008). “The Canonization of Clare of Assisi and the History of the Early Franciscan Order.” In: The Journal of Ecclesiastical History, vol. 59, nos. 208–226 (February 2008). http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0022046907004137
  19. AbTomasetti, Aloysii (ed.). Bullarum, Diplomatum et Privilegiorum Sanctorum Romanorum Pontificum, III, Turin, 1858, pp. 620–624
  20. AbPope Alexander IV, Bullarum, Diplomatum et Privilegiorum Sanctorum Romanorum Pontificum, III, Turin, 1858, pp. 620–624
  21. (26 September 1255). “Clara claris praeclara,” as the Latin phrase goes. The Franciscan Archive is a collection of documents relating to the Franciscan Order. Pope Pius XII was elected on July 30, 2019. (21 August 1958). “Apostolic Letter Proclaming St. Claire Patrone Céleste of Television” (in French)
  22. “Ban the plum, banish the plague” (in English). The Telegraph published an article on January 27th, 2001. Roces, Alejandro (April 3, 2017)
  23. Retrieved on April 3, 2017. (1980). Fiesta. Vera-Reyes, Manila, Philippines, p. 83
  24. Reulein, Peter
  25. Schlegel, Helmut (2016). Laudato si’ / A Magnificat in the style of the French language. Dehm Verlag, Limburg a der Lahn, Germany, ISBN 978-3-943302-34-9, ISBN 978-3-943302-34-9, ISBN 978-3-943302-34-9, ISBN 978-3-943302-34-9, ISBN 978-3-943302-34-9, ISBN 978-3-943302-34-9, ISBN 978-3-943302-34-9, ISBN 978-3-943302-34-9, ISBN 978-3-943302-34 The Church of England is a denomination in the United Kingdom. retrieved on the 27th of March, 2021

Sources

  • Marco Bartoli is the author of this work. Clare of Assisi is a saint from the Italian city of Assisi. Quincy, Illinois: Franciscan Press, 1993.ISBN 978-0819909633
  • Quincy, Illinois: Franciscan Press, 1993.ISBN 978-0819909633

Further reading

  • Acta Sanctorum, August II(in Latin), 1867, pages. 739–768
  • Armstrong, Regis J., Acta Sanctorum, August II(in Latin), 1867, pp. 739–768. (ed. and trans.). Clare of Assisi: Early Documents, 3rd edition, is a biography of Clare of Assisi. 978-1565482210
  • Brady, Kathleen. New York: New City Press, 2006. ISBN 978-1565482210
  • Brady, Kathleen. The Struggles of the Saints of Assisi is a documentary about Francis and Clare of Assisi. 978-1737549802
  • Caxton, William. New York: Lodwin Press, 2021ISBN978-1737549802
  • Caxton, William. The Life of the Holy Virgin St. Clare is a work of fiction. Fordham University (New York, 2000)
  • MARIUS FIEGE (Fiege) The Princess of Poverty: Saint Clare of Assisi and the Order of Poor Ladies, 2nd ed., Evansville, Indiana: Poor Clares of the Monastery of Saint Clare, 1909
  • The Princess of Poverty: Saint Clare of Assisi and the Order of Poor Ladies, 2nd ed., Evansville, Indiana: Poor Clares of the Monastery of Saint Clare, 1909
  • Kirkham, John Paul. Saint Clare of Assisi, 2nd edition, 2020
  • Kirkham, John Paul. The Breviary of the Romans, Volume III. pp. 815–816
  • Thomas of Celano, published by W. Blackwood in Edinburgh in 1908. (attributed). The Life of Saint Clare is a work of fiction. Paschal Robinson has done the translation. Published by the Dolphin Press in Philadelphia in 1910.

External links

  • August II (in Latin), 1867, pp. 739–768
  • Armstrong, Regis J., “Acta Sanctorum,” August II (in Latin), 1867, pages. 739–768. (ed. and trans.). Three-volume set of early documents about St. Clare of Assisi. 978-1565482210
  • Brady, Kathleen. New York: New City Press, 2006. ISBN 978-1565482210. The Struggles of the Saints of Assisi is a documentary film about Francis and Clare. A new edition of William Caxton’s classic novel is published by Lodwin Press in New York in 2021 with ISBN 978-1737549802. Clare’s Life is a fictionalized account of her life as a virgin. In 2000, Fordham University published a report titled It’s Marianus Fiege, by the way! 2nd edition of The Princess of Poverty: Saint Clare of Assisi and the Order of Poor Ladies by the Poor Clares of the Monastery of Saint Clare, Evansville, Indiana (Poor Clares Press, 1909)
  • The Princess of Poverty: Saint Clare of Assisi and the Order of Poor Ladies, 2nd edition by the Poor Clares of the Monastery of Saint Clare, Evansville (Indiana): Poor Clares of St. Clare of Assisi, by John Paul Kirkham, 2nd edition, 2020
  • Kirkham, John Paul. The Breviary of the Romans, volume three. pp. 815–816
  • Thomas of Celano, Edinburgh: W. Blackwood, 1908. (attributed). Clare’s Life is a book about her. Paschal Robinson has translated this text. The Dolphin Press, Philadelphia, 1910, is a publisher of books.

St. Clare of Assisi

Acta Sanctorum, August II (in Latin), 1867, pages. 739–768; Armstrong, Regis J., Acta Sanctorum, August II (in Latin), 1867, pp. 739–768. (ed. and trans.). Clare of Assisi: Early Documents, 3rd edition, is a biography of the saint. Brady, Kathleen. New York: New City Press, 2006. ISBN 978-1565482210. Francis and Clare: The Assisi Saints’ Struggles Caxton, William. New York: Lodwin Press, 2021ISBN978-1737549802; Lodwin Press, 2021ISBN978-1737549802 The Life of the Holy Virgin St. Clare is a fictionalized account of her life.

The Princess of Poverty: Saint Clare of Assisi and the Order of Poor Ladies, 2nd ed., Evansville, Indiana: Poor Clares of the Monastery of Saint Clare, 1909; The Princess of Poverty: Saint Clare of Assisi and the Order of Poor Ladies, 2nd ed., Evansville, Indiana: Poor Clares of the Monastery of Saint Clare, 1909; The Princess of Poverty: Saint Clar St.

Blackwood, 1908, pp.

The Life of Saint Clare is a book about her.

Dolphin Press, Philadelphia, 1910;

St. Clare of Assisi

Lived between 1194 and 1253. Saint August 11th is a feast day. Clare is supposed to have been born on July 16, 1194, in Assisi, Italy, according to tradition. While the precise year of her birth is still up in the air, there is no doubt that she was the oldest of three daughters born to the rich Offreduccios. Her early years were not marked by anything particularly noteworthy. Clare, along with her sisters, lived the life of an affluent family in the era in which they lived. Clare spent her formative years learning to play the piano, embroider finely, and provide entertainment for visitors at social events.

  1. Clare’s mother, Ortolana, was a devout Catholic who instilled in all of her children a love of Jesus as well as the significance of attending Sunday Mass and praying.
  2. By the time she was seventeen years old, he had found her a wealthy guy who would marry her.
  3. She had everything – but she didn’t feel as joyful and tranquil as she believed she should be given her circumstances.
  4. During her childhood, Clare was a huge hit at the parties organized for the affluent young people of Assisi, where she made many friends.
  5. Francis at one of these gatherings before he left all of his worldly possessions behind.
  6. This time, he and his brothers were zealously teaching about Jesus and caring for the less fortunate than themselves.
  7. In comparison to her father and uncles, who were some of the most accomplished men in Assisi, she found Francis and his brothers to be a source of more tranquility.

Clare attended the Lenten Sermons that Francis gave in 1211 and then had a private meeting with him thereafter.

She realized at that point what she wanted to do with her life.

She went to the Portiuncula, where Francis and his disciples were holding lighted candles and singing the psalms, and she wore her most beautiful clothes and jewelry.

She stripped off her ostentatious clothing and jewellery and donned a ragged gray robe and wooden shoes, embracing poverty in the process.

Francis himself as a symbol of her renunciation of the world.

Clare’s father was enraged that his oldest daughter had decided to accompany Francis and his adherents.

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She dashed into the chapel and physically grabbed on to the Altar while her relatives attempted to transport her back to their house.

Others began to join Francis and Clare in their labor and prayer, including Clare’s own sister Agnes, who eventually became their spiritual director.

Upon the death of Clare’s father, she would be welcomed into the community, along with other affluent ladies from the village and from as far away as the famous city of Florence, among other things.

They would become known as the Poor Clares in due course.

It was only through their embrace of prayer that they were able to match their poverty.

Francis, Clare, and their followers made a promise that they would not have any material goods.

It was a style of life that some in the Church were uncomfortable with.

Francis died in 1226, Clare was entrusted with the responsibility of ensuring that the Sisters’ adoption of “Sister Poverty” was included into their Rule.

Many people from all across Europe traveled to Assisi, drawn by the prayer and joyous attitude of Clare and her sisters, and were impacted by their presence.

In 1240, the Saracens invaded Ireland, and one of the stories about the power of St.

As the invading forces surrounded and attacked Assisi, they made their way through the city, where they came across San Damiano, the convent where Clare and her sisters were hiding because it was outside the city walls.

Clare’s sisters were alarmed as the warriors arrived and awakened Clare from her sick bed as a result.

When the enemy saw Clare with the Blessed Sacrament, they initially stopped in their tracks and then began to flee, overwhelmed by a sensation of horror.

Clare was unable to attend Midnight Mass at the Church of St.

She died the next day.

Upon understanding that her lonely cell was a far superior place to stay than Mary and Joseph had been, she began to reflect on the mystery of Christmas.

Francis, which was blazing with candles, through the cracks in the door.

She had been unable to attend services at the church, and God, in His loving kindness, sent the church to her.

The news of their unorthodox way of living spread throughout the country.

Clare was so well-known for her sanctity that the Pope and a slew of other dignitaries visited her on her deathbed.

She was canonized barely over two months after her death on October 18, 1253, thanks to her well-known holiness of life, which led the Church to initiate the canonization process for her.

On August 15, 1255, Pope Alexander IV officially declared Mary a saint for the first time.

She was named patroness of individuals concerned in television and the media on February 17, 1958, by Pope Pius XII, who pronounced her such on February 17, 1958. Poor Clare convents may be found all over the world now, numbering in the hundreds. Fr. John O’Connor compiled this list.

Saint Clare of Assisi

The Life and Times of Saint Clare of Assisi Clare is shown as a golden-haired beauty floating across sun-drenched meadows in one of the more saccharine movies created about Francis of Assisi. She is portrayed as a one-woman parallel to the fledgling Franciscan Order in another. The beginning of her religious life was undoubtedly movie material, as was her conversion to Christianity. Clare, who had refused to marry when she was 15 years old, was affected by Francis’s powerful preaching. He became a longtime companion as well as a spiritual mentor for her.

  1. In the humble small church known as the Portiuncula, she swapped her glittering belt for a plain rope with knots in it, and she offered her long hair to Francis’ scissors.
  2. Clare clung to the altar of the church, pushed her veil away to reveal her short hair, and stayed steadfast in her convictions.
  3. Others showed up.
  4. Clare was 21 years old when Francis forced her to assume the position of abbess, which she held until her death at the hands of Francis.
  5. After some time, Clare, like Francis, convinced her sisters to relax their severity by reminding them that “our bodies are not built of brass.” The focus was, of course, on gospel poverty as a matter of course.

Although everyone, including Pope Francis, attempted to encourage Clare to moderate her practice, she maintained her trademark steadfastness: “I need to be forgiven from my sins, but I do not desire to be released from the necessity of following Jesus Christ.” Clare’s existence in the monastery of San Damiano in Assisi is lauded in contemporary records, which are full of affection for her.

  1. She had returned from prayer, according to reports, and her face was so radiant that it dazzling all who were around her.
  2. Clare’s influence was such that popes, cardinals, and bishops frequently came to her for advice, despite the fact that she never left the walls of San Damiano.
  3. Clare was always faithful to his wishes as well as to the great gospel ideal that he was striving to make a reality in his life.
  4. When the convent came under siege by invading Saracens, Clare ordered the Blessed Sacrament to be put on the walls of the building.
  5. “Don’t be scared,” she urged to her sisters in response to their fears.

Reflection Clare’s 41 years of religious life are a study in sanctity: an unwavering determination to live the simple, literal gospel life as Francis taught her; courageous resistance to the constant pressure to dilute the ideal; a passion for poverty and humility; an ardent life of prayer; and a generous concern for her sisters are just a few examples.

Saint Clare is the patron saint of the following:Protection against eye diseases Television

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On July 16, 1194, St. Clare of Assisi was born into the Assisi aristocracy, becoming the first female saint. Members of her family referred to her as a sensitive youngster who was also devout and kind. In the wake of hearing Saint Francis preach, she confided in the saint about her want to devote her life to serving God. Clare quietly left her noble house with her cousin Pacifica on the evening of Palm Sunday in the year 1212, and she was never seen or heard from again. When Clare arrived to the Church of “Our Lady of the Angels” on October 25, Francis dressed her in sackcloth and chopped her hair, symbolizing her surrender of the world.

  • The Rule of St.
  • Clare, who remained true to her path.
  • She did so, and as a result, she was elevated to the position of abbess of the Poor Clares.
  • There is very little information available concerning St.
  • We are aware that she became a living example of the poverty, humility, and mortification preached by St.
  • Clare, like St.
  • One of her most well-known exploits is the use of a consecrated Host to ward off intruders.
  • Clare was dissatisfied with the fact that her sickness prevented her from attending Mass at the newly constructed Basilica of St.
  • She was suddenly graced with a vision of the Mass on her wall, and she was able to hear and see it miraculously from a distance of many miles away.
  • On August 11, 1253, St.
  • Pope Alexander IV canonized her on September 26, 1255, a short time after she was declared a saint.

St. Clare of Assisi – Saints & Angels

Saint Clare of Assisi was born on July 16, 1194, into the noble family of Assisi. Families and friends knew her for being an emotionally fragile little girl, who was also devout and loving. In the wake of hearing Saint Francis preach, she confided in the saint about her wish to devote her life to serving Christ. Clare quietly left her aristocratic house with her cousin Pacifica on the evening of Palm Sunday in the year 1212, never to be seen again. Clare’s abandonment of the world was signaled by Francis, who dressed her in sackcloth and chopped her hair at the Church of ‘Our Lady of the Angels.’ From that moment on, she swore to devote her entire life to the service of Jesus, her heavenly spouse, and took the veil of monastic life from Francis.

  1. Benedict, tempered with Francis’ sermon on poverty, was adopted by St.
  2. When she arrived at San Damiano, she quickly gained a large female following, which Francis encouraged her to turn into a monastery.
  3. Following Clare’s death, her mother and sisters became members of the organization, which has hundreds of members today.
  4. Clare’s time in the convent is only partially documented.
  5. Francis.
  6. Francis, Clare is remembered for the numerous miracles she performed throughout her lifetime.
  7. It was at this point that the assailants fled when she placed the Sacrament in a monstrance outside the convent gates.
  8. Francis on Christmas Eve 1252, which marked the end of her life at the time.

Consequently, Mary has been designated as the patron saint of television and the patron saint of hurting eyes as a result of her visions. On August 11, 1253, St. Clare died at Assisi. The Pope, Alexander IV, canonized her on September 26, 1255, which was a short time after she was found guilty.

Saint Clare of Assisi

“Go forward with confidence, Christian soul, knowing that you have a trustworthy guide on your trip. Don’t be afraid, for the One who created you has sanctified you, has always safeguarded you, and loves you as a mother would love her children.” In 1253, Saint Clare was on her deathbed and said the following: Saint Clare was born in Assisi in 1193 to a noble family and is known as the “Servant of God.” Her mother got a sign before her birth, indicating that her daughter would be a shining beacon of God’s love in the world.

  • Her early years were marked by a profound attraction to the things of God, which manifested itself in ardent prayer, frequent visits to the Blessed Sacrament, and a sensitive love for the poor.
  • Francis preach in the town square during Lent, when she was 18, she knew right away that she had been called by God to dedicate her life to Him.
  • Francis and his companions were sleeping, where she expressed her wish to follow him in his way of life.
  • He welcomed her, gave her his tunic, and clipped her golden locks.
  • When Clare was 22 years old, St.
  • The ‘Poor Clares,’ as they were eventually dubbed, led an exceptionally austere existence for women of the time, wandering around town barefoot begging for handouts while dressed in sackcloth and living without any belongings, utterly reliant on the generosity of others for their meals.
  • Many young aristocratic ladies gave up everything to follow St.
  • Clare as their model and inspiration, and the order flourished.
  • The Pope desired to canonize Clare immediately after her death, but was encouraged to wait by his cardinals.
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Clare of Assisi Facts for Kids

Quick facts for kidsSaint Clare of Assisi
Detail depicting Saint Clare from afresco(c. 1320) bySimone Martiniin the Lower basilica of San Francesco,Assisi
Virgin
Born 16 July 1194Assisi
Died 11 August 1253 (aged 59)Assisi
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church,Anglican Communion,Lutheran Church
Canonized 26 September 1255,RomebyPope Alexander IV
Majorshrine Basilica of Saint Clare,Assisi
Feast 11 August (1970 to date),12 August (1255–1969)
Attributes Monstrance, pyx,lamp, habit of the Poor Clares
Patronage Eye disease,goldsmiths,laundry,television, good weather, needleworkers;Santa Clara, California;Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico; Obando, Bulacan, Philippines

Clare of Assisi (July 16, 1194 – August 11, 1253), also known as Chiara Offreduccio, was an Italian saint who lived from 1194 to 1253. She was one of Saint Francis of Assisi’s early disciples, having arrived in the city in 1207. The aristocratic lineage of Saint Clare of Assisi was traced back to her father, Favorone Offreduccio, who was the Count of Sassi-Rosso, and her mother, Ortolana di Fiumi, who came from noble stock. Chiara Offreduccio da Favaronne was given the name Chiara when she was born in Assisi.

  1. She was the eldest of four children in her household.
  2. She was very touched by his sermon, and she fled to be with him as soon as she could.
  3. Claire’s family discovered where she was staying, but when they arrived to pick her up and take her back home, she clung to the altar, declaring that she would only be married to the Lord Jesus Christ.
  4. Later, when she was 21 years old, she was transferred to another convent near the San Damiano church, where she was made superior and served in that position for 40 years.
  5. Saint Clare of Assisi will be recognized for creating the “Order of Poor Ladies,” which was subsequently renamed the “Poor Clares,” which is still in existence today.

The Poor Clares were a religious order with rigorous regulations, including vows of silence, poverty, and fasting on a rigid schedule. The Poor Clares were a religious organization for women dedicated to bringing them closer to God.

Images for kids

  • The church of San Damiano in Assisi contains a fresco depicting Saint Clare and her order’s nuns. The statue of Saint Clare of Assisi, made of wax, is housed at the Basilica of Saint Clare in Assisi. In the backdrop, there is a television screen, and the figure is made of glow-in-the-dark plastic and depicts Saint Clare of Assisi. In this panel by Giovanni di Paolo, 1455, depicting Saint Clare saving a child from a wolf, the Basilica of Saint Clare in Assisi is the setting.

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The Finding of the Body of St. Clare of Assisi: September 25

Clare of Assisi died on August 9, 1253, just two days after Pope Innocent IV issued the papal bull Solet annuere, which confirmed that Clare’s rule would serve as the governing norm for her community of Poor Ladies at San Damiano. Clare died two days later, at the age of 59, after a long illness. Meanwhile, work was underway on a basilica to house her relics, which would be built close to the church of San Giorgio (where St. Francis’ bones had originally been deposited). Clare of Assisi was canonized by Pope Alexander IV on August 15, 1255, and is now known as Saint Clare of Assisi.

  • Clare’s remains were buried beneath the high altar.
  • Clare was buried under the high altar of her basilica, deep beneath the ground.
  • Francis’s bones during the previous excavations and discoveries.
  • When the tomb was uncovered, it was discovered that St.
  • In addition to the rule that she had written, she was buried with her ill-fitting garment as well.
  • The Franciscans and Conventuals, as well as the Poor Clares, commemorate the feast of the Finding of the Body of St.
  • Saint Clare’s remains continued to decay over time; as a result, a mask was built to conceal her remains, which were eventually reduced to a pile of skeletal fragments.

It has been granted by a Poor Clare sister who has been to Assisi on a pilgrimage and has been granted access to the rear of St.

Clare’s bones she took.

Clare’s skull may be seen in the lower center right of the image.

Clare’s body that is available for public viewing.

During her most recent repair, an entirely new head was created digitally to match her bone structure and function.

Clare’s face as it appears today. Photo courtesy of Clare. The corpse of St. Clare is entombed in the crypt under the main altar of her basilica. If you look closely at the image of St. Clare’s bones above, you can see the back of her veil, as well as the left side of the mask’s face.

St Clare of Assisi

Clare was born into the Assisi aristocracy on July 16, 1194, and was the daughter of a noble family. Members of her family recall her as a sensitive youngster who was also peaceful, pious, and compassionate as a child, according to her mother. She would occasionally remove food from her plate in order to subsequently provide it to the less fortunate. After hearing a young man (St. Francis) preach, she was inspired to live the faith in a more radical way. She became known as “Sister Francis.” On the evening of Palm Sunday, March 20, 1212, she sneaked out of her parents house with her cousin Pacifica, never to be seen or heard from again.

  • Her fine garments were left aside in the small chapel of “Mary of the Angels,” and Francis, after cutting off her beautiful blonde hair, dressed her in a rough tunic and a heavy veil, which she had brought with her from her home.
  • Francis initially put her with the Benedictine sisters of San Palos in Bastia, then with the nuns of San Angelo in Panzo, and lastly with the nuns of San Damiano, which Francis had restored with his own hands after he had died.
  • At first, the majority of the young ladies who joined her in this life of extreme poverty were from from aristocratic families in Assisi and the surrounding region, which was not uncommon at the time.
  • Many prelates attempted over the course of many years to draft a rule for the Poor Ladies that was heavily inspired by St.
  • While visiting Clare at San Damiano, Pope Gregory IX tried unsuccessfully to persuade her to adopt a less rigorous vow of poverty.

The Death of Saint Clare

Assisi is located in central Italy, and Saint Clare was a rich woman who chose to give up all of her things in order to follow the principles of poverty and service advocated by Saint Francis. She established a religious order known as the Poor Clares, which was officially approved by the Pope in 1253. In this artwork, Saint Clare’s death is seen through the eyes of one of her disciples, Sister Benvenuta of Diambra, as she sees it in her vision. Saint Clare was on her deathbed when she was visited by the Virgin Mary and a procession of virgin martyrs, according to a vision of Saint Benvenuta.

A cosmopolitan component of the International Style, which thrived about 1400 and was represented by the work of the Master of Heiligenkreuz, who was most likely working in Lower Austria, may be seen in the work of the Master of Heiligenkreuz.

As a result, the panel’s surface is treated with a range of diverse techniques to create a very beautiful piece.

More information on this picture may be found in the booklet produced by the Gallery. It is possible to download a free PDF version of German Paintings from the Fifteenth to the Seventeenth Centuries.

Inscription

Dii labia is written on the left-hand page of a book carried by a nun in the lower right.

Provenance

Perhaps the Poor Clare Convent at Eger (Cheb), Bohemia (now Czechoslovakia), or the Convent of the Poor Clares in Eger (Erlau), Hungary. (1921/1922); (Walter Schnackenberg, Munich), 1921/1922-1951; in 1943, a one-third share was acquired from Schnackenberg by Carl Langbehn, Munich, and passed by inheritance to his mother, Marta Langbehn; and in 1951, a one-third share was acquired from Walter Schnackenberg by Carl Langbehn, Munich, and passed by inheritance to his mother, Marta Langbehn. owned jointly by (SeilerCo., Walter Schnackenberg, and Alfred Müller, Munich); sold 1951 to (M.

Kress Foundation, New York; gift 1952 to the National Gallery of Art (NGA) by exchange

Technical Summary

The support looks to be made up of a three-member panel of fir with grain that runs vertically across the surface. As previously stated, direct investigation was not feasible due to the presence of mahogany strips 0.5 cm thick encircling the margins of the panel, which was also linked to the reverse with a wooden cradle. A reasonably thick coating of wax has been applied to the reverse of the panel. Most of the composition’s principal design elements, including the outlines of the people, the basic drapery folds, the major architectural motifs, and countless details, are incised into the smooth white ground layer, which is considered to have been placed relatively heavily in this case.

In order to construct ornate patterns and angel figures in gold leaf, a large number of punches in a broad range of sizes were needed to make them.

It was discovered that the Cleveland Museum of Art’s The Death of the Virgin pendant, which is technically compatible with the National Gallery’s painting, included crucial information regarding the picture’s probable initial condition.

1.3 cm thick, the Cleveland panel has an original coating of white ground on the reverse, and it has not been trimmed or cradled in any way.

In the Cleveland panel, a very coarse and loosely woven plain-weave fabric can be seen between the support and the top ground and paint layers, suggesting that the cloth was made with a loom.

When the metal content of the pigments in both paintings was tested with x-ray fluorescence, it was discovered that the results were quite comparable for both paintings.

Throughout the vehicle, little pinpoint losses may be found, and some of the paint surfaces have been minutely abraded.

Clare’s bed is adorned with a shabby set of gold stars.

Abies) after conducting extensive testing.

The assessment was undertaken 7-8 April 1988 by the author and by Paula DeCristofaro, previously associate conservator for the Systematic Catalogue, with Bruce F.

Miller, conservator of paintings at the Cleveland Museum of Art. I am exceedingly thankful to Mr. Miller and his colleagues for their assistance in making the picture available to us.

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