Where Is Mont Saint Michel

Mont-Saint-Michel

Home GeographyTravel Landforms and Islands: Physical Geography of the Land France is an archipelago with islands. Alternative titles include: Mont Tombe is a mountain in France. Mont-Saint-Michel is a rocky islet and famed sanctuary located off the coast of Normandy in the Manchedépartement of the Normandy Region of France. It is located around 41 miles (66 kilometers) north of Rennes and 32 miles (52 kilometers) east of Saint-Malo. Mount St. Mary is surrounded by medieval walls and towers, which rise above the village’s clustered dwellings, with the ancientabbey perched atop the mountain’s summit.

Mont-Saint-Michel is practically round (it has a circumference of approximately 3,000 feet) and is made up of a granite outcrop that rises steeply (to a height of 256 feet) out of Mont-Saint-Michel Bay (betweenBrittanyand Normandy).

Fast sand and extremely fast rising tides made it particularly difficult to reach the island prior to the construction of a 3,000-foot causeway connecting it to the rest of the island’s infrastructure.

Islands & Archipelagos: A Quiz from Britannica What is the composition of the islands of the Maldives?

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  • Aubert, bishop of Avranches, had a vision of the archangel St.
  • The island has been a popular tourist destination since since.
  • When King Philipp II of France attempted to seize the peak in 1203 it was partially destroyed.
  • In 1256, the island was fortified to withstand sieges during the Hundred Years’ War between England and France (1337–1453) and the French Wars of Religion (1562–98).
  • During Napoleon I’s rule (1804–14/15), it was converted into a state jail, and it continued to function as a prison until 1863.
  • The magnificent abbey church, which towers over the island, features an enormous Romanesque nave erected in the 11th and 12th centuries, as well as a beautiful choir in theFlamboyantGothic style (built between 1450 and 1520).
  • Michael, were built.
  • It was established in 1228, and the outside walls of the magnificent Gothic monastery La Merveille combine the formidable features of a castle with the simplicity of a religious structure.
  • The medieval walls (13th–15th centuries) that line the southern and eastern sides of the summit provide a panoramic view of the harbor and surrounding area.

The population was 46 in 1999 and 36 in 2014, according to the most recent census. Amy Tikkanen has made the most current revisions and updates to this page.

Visit the Mont-Saint-Michel and its Bay in Normandy

On the 1st of December, 2021, an update was made. Time required for reading: 3 minutes France’s most beautiful sites are the Mont-Saint Michel and its Bay, a picturesque island capped by a gravity-defying monastery that is one of the world’s most photographed places. This sacred island, which has been an important pilgrimage site in Europe for centuries, is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, as is the surrounding harbor, which is also a World Heritage Site.

TOP tip

In the summer, take advantage of a late-afternoon visit. Starting at 7 p.m., the parking fee is decreased, and the abbey is open until midnight. ‘Chronicles of the Mount’ night performance will be performed every evening, save on Sundays, from the beginning of July until the end of August, weather permitting.

AN UNFORGETTABLE SIGHT

The Mont-Saint-Michel is one of Europe’s most memorable views, and it is a must-see for everyone. The hill, which is situated in a mesmerizing bay shared by Normandy and Brittany, catches the eye from a long distance away. This breathtakingly stunning place has captivated people’s attention for a long time. During the early eighth century, Aubert, bishop of the nearby hilltop town of Avranches, claimed that the Archangel Michael himself had compelled him to have a church built atop an island just out to sea.

The establishment of a significant Benedictine monastery atop Mont-Saint-Michel was backed by the dukes of Normandy, who were followed by the French monarchs, beginning in 966 and continuing until the present day.

Despite the ongoing cross-Channel battle, a large number of pilgrims came to the island; in fact, the defenses at the base of the island were erected to keep the English soldiers away.

E.

RESTORING THE Bay of the MONT-SAINT-MICHEL tO ITS FORMER GLORY

Over the previous few of centuries, the Bay of Saint-Michel has been prone to silting up due to a combination of factors. This problem has been exacerbated by man-made activities such as farming and the construction of a causeway to the mount. However, a significant conservation initiative completed in 2015 has contributed to the restoration of the island status of the Mont-Saint-Michel. Because the Couesnon River, the major river entering the bay, has been allowed to flow more freely in order to sweep sediments out to sea, a bridge has been built in lieu of the ancient causeway, allowing the sea to once more completely encircle the peak during extremely high tides.

HOW TO GET TO the MONT-SAINT-MICHEL

The tourist car parks have been relocated further inland in order to protect the magnificent beauty of the Mont-Saint-Michel. The nearest parking lots are around 1.5 km away from the mount. Once you have parked, proceed to the Place des Navettes, where you will board one of the specially designed shuttle buses, known as passeurs, that will transport you up the mount. In addition, the shuttle bus stop is 800m (half a mile) away from the vehicle parks, and the passeurs station is 450m away from the mountain.

The passeurs are on the job every day between 7:30 a.m. and midnight at regular intervals, except on Sundays. A unique horse-drawn carriage (maringote) may be hired, or you can walk all the way from the parking lots to the mount, soaking in the beauty of the Mont-Saint Michel as you go.

8 Things to Know Before You Visit the Mont Saint-Michel

France’s Mont Saint-Michel, taken by 4maksym / Getty Images. It is estimated that roughly 2.5 million visitors travel to the Mont Saint-Michel each year, making it one of the most frequented destinations in France. Who could blame someone for wanting to see and experience this legendary island, which has a history spanning more than a thousand years? It is critical to plan ahead of time when dealing with a large number of guests. Here are some things you should know before you travel to the Mont Saint-Michel in order to have a pleasant and unforgettable experience.

  1. Consider spending at least one night in the neighborhood instead.
  2. Consider establishing a base in Rennes, the capital of the Brittany region.
  3. Another choice is the seaside town of Saint-Malo, which is about an hour’s drive from the Mont Saint-Michel and a lovely area to spend an evening relaxing by the sea.
  4. Each situation has its own set of advantages.
  5. Low tide is equally intriguing, since it completely surrounds the commune with sand, allowing visitors to stroll around its circumference and study it from a different perspective than they would otherwise be able to.
  6. This will ensure that you are kept safe while on the tour.

Photograph by Peter Adams Photography Ltd / Alamy Stock Photo of Mont Saint Michel, Normandy It’s vital to remember while visiting the Mont Saint-Michel that it isn’t a manufactured tourist destination and that it is actually home to 44 people, including the monks and nuns who live in the Abbey.

  • Be respectful of their house and refrain from photographing the people, especially during religious events.
  • There are also a significant number of steps to negotiate, particularly when ascending to the Abbey.
  • A nun on the island of Mont Saint Michel|David Bagnall / Alamy Stock Photography Omelettes and crepes are two of the most well-known foods served at the Mont Saint-Michel.
  • La Mère Poulard, the most well-known restaurant on the island, has been in operation since 1888, and its infamously fluffy omelettes are often considered to be the greatest in the world.
  • Crêperie La Cloche is a popular crepe shop in the area, and it is a favorite with visitors.
  • The option of bringing a picnic lunch is excellent.
  • Make a point of visiting the Terrasse de l’Ouest, which provides a breathtaking view of the Bay of Naples.
  • But there are several sights and activities to see and do in the area, including museums and churches in addition to the beautiful Abbey situated atop the hill.
  • Watch out for the parish church of Saint-Pierre, which is flanked by a cemetery (where Anne Boutiaut, La Mère Poulard herself, is buried) and which has a silver statue dedicated to Saint-Michel on the Grande Rue on the route up to the Abbey.
  • Photo by MARKA / Alamy shows the Abbey of Mont Saint Michel La Mère Poulard is also well-known for her buttery cookies, which are a wonderful (and delectable) remembrance of her visit.

They’re available for purchase around the hamlet, although they can be purchased for a fraction of the cost in practically any grocery shop in France.

Mont-Saint-Michel bay

The Abbey of Saint-Michel, Normandy, France|4maksym / Getty Images It is estimated that roughly 2.5 million visitors travel to the Mont Saint-Michel each year, making it one of France’s most visited attractions. After all, with over a thousand years of history under its belt, who could blame anyone for wanting to see and experience this legendary island? It is critical to organize ahead of time when dealing with a large number of guests. To ensure that your journey to the Mont Saint-Michel is as seamless and enjoyable as possible, here are some things to know before going.

  1. Consider spending at least one night in the vicinity instead.
  2. You might want to consider establishing a base in Rennes, the capital of the province of Brittany.
  3. Another choice is the seaside village of Saint-Malo, which is about an hour’s drive from the Mont Saint-Michel and a lovely area to spend an evening relaxing by the water.
  4. Each situation has its own set of benefits.
  5. Low tide is equally intriguing, as it completely surrounds the commune with sand, allowing visitors to stroll around its circumference and study it from a different perspective than they would otherwise have.
  6. This will guarantee that you are kept safe while on your adventure.
  7. Peter Adams Photography Ltd / Alamy Stock Photo of the Mont Saint Michel in Normandy, France During your visit, it’s vital to remember that the Mont Saint-Michel isn’t just a tourist attraction; it’s a real community with 44 residents, including the monks and nuns who live in the Abbey.
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Be respectful of their house and refrain from photographing the people, particularly during religious events.

A significant number of steps must be ascended as well, particularly when ascending to the Abbey grounds.

Photograph of a nun near the Mont Saint Michel by David Bagnall / Alamy Stock Photo Breakfast delicacies such as omelets and crepes are popular at the Mont Saint-Michel.

In operation since 1888, La Mère Poulard is widely regarded as the greatest omelette in the world, thanks to its famously fluffy omelettes that are renowned across the world.

Visitor favorite Crêperie La Cloche is a great place to have crepes.

The option of bringing a picnic lunch is ideal.

Make a point of visiting the Terrasse de l’Ouest, which gives a breathtaking view of the Bay of Naples.

But there are several sights and activities to see and do in the area, including museums and churches in addition to the beautiful Abbey situated atop the hill.

Watch out for the parish church of Saint-Pierre, which is flanked by a cemetery (where Anne Boutiaut, La Mère Poulard herself, is buried) and which has a silver statue dedicated to Saint-Michel on the Grande Rue on the route up to the Abbaye.

Photo by MARKA / Alamy shows the Abbey of Mont Saint Michel.

Mère Poulard is also known for her buttery cookies, which are a wonderful (and delectable) keepsake from her travels. Despite the fact that they are available for purchase throughout the hamlet, they can be purchased for a fraction of the price at practically any grocery shop around France.

Unforgettable hikes

The Baie de Mont-Saint-Michel puts up a spectacle that is always changing, but always exquisite. With its significant tidal changes, it is recommended that visitors only go out across it with an expert guide, such as from one of the Maisons de la Baie, or tourist centers, which specialize in the bay’s history and ecology. One of the themed trips includes a visit to the Banc des Hermelles, an incredible reef constructed entirely by sea worms! Here, on the boundary between Brittany and Normandy, the greatGR34hiking path that travels completely around the coast of Brittany begins, passing first in front of the church of Saint-Anne alongside Cherrueix, a location well-known for its sand-yachting.

Culinary treasures

The bulwark that ran down most of the Breton length of the bay allowed for very profitable farming in the areas behind it to be accomplished. Stalls are frequently put up selling superb veggies, including large tresses of garlic that are very amazing. Windmills previously dotted the landscape around the bay, and although most have been abandoned, some are available to the public, such as the Moulin de la Saline in Cherrueix, which describes the region’s rich gastronomic heritage.

A fabulous forest in the bay

The bulwark that ran down most of the Breton length of the bay allowed for very profitable farming on the fields behind it to be accomplished. Stalls are frequently set up offering great veggies, especially spectacular tresses of garlic, which are generally sold in large quantities. Even while windmills used to be found in vast numbers surrounding the bay, many of them have been abandoned. The Moulin de la Saline in Cherrueix, for example, is dedicated to the region’s rich culinary heritage.

History of the monument

The architecture of the Abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel is a testament to the competence and expertise of multiple generations of builders who worked on it. Over a period of 1,300 years, and on a difficult terrain, the Abbey’s building is an unquestionable technical and aesthetic achievement.

  • AN IMPORTANT SITE SINCE THE MIDDLE AGES
  • THE ABBEY AND FORTRESS
  • THE ABBEY SINCE THE REVOLUTION
  • THE STORY CONTINUES

A PRESTIGIOUS SITE SINCE THE MIDDLE AGES

Bishop Aubert dedicated the first church atop Mont Tombe in honor of the Archangel Michael in 708, marking the beginning of the long and illustrious history of Mont-Saint-Michel. On the request of Richard I, Duke of Normandy, Benedictine monks established a settlement in the city in 966. These monks, who worked under the supervision of the Abbot and adhered to the Rule of Saint Benedict, were responsible for the expansion of the new monastery. The Abbey swiftly rose to prominence as a significant pilgrimage destination in the Christian West, as well as one of the most important centers of medieval culture, where a vast quantity of manuscripts were produced and preserved.

The spiral staircase at Mont-Saint-Michel Abbey (on the left) and the so-called Ranulphe staircase (on the right) – Photo courtesy of Colombe Clier / Centre des monuments nationaux Due to the fact that building on this historic monument began in the 10th century and continued until the 19th century restorations, it has a diverse range of architectural styles.

The Abbey has seen several transformations throughout the years, including fires, collapses, reconstructions, changes in usage, and restorations.

The ambulatory of the monks at the Abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel – Photograph by Étienne Revault / Centre des monuments nationaux The Merveillebuilding is frequently referred to as the “jewel in the crown” of the Abbey’s architectural accomplishments.

This masterwork of Norman Gothic art gives testament to the architectural prowess of the builders who worked on it in the 13th century.

Abbey and fortress

Mont-Saint-Michel, located on the border between Normandy and Brittany, served as both a point of passage and a stronghold for the Duchy of Normandy over its history. Beginning in the 14th century, the recurrent battles of the Hundred Years War between France and England necessitated the construction of new, formidable fortresses to protect both countries. The Mount, which was guarded by a small band of knights loyal to the King of France and fortified by a wall flanked by many defensive towers, was able to withstand raids by the English army for over three decades.

Photo courtesy of René-Jacques and the National Monuments Preservation Center The Romanesque chancel of the church was destroyed in 1421 during a horrific siege, and it was not entirely rebuilt until 100 years later, in a magnificent Gothic form, that it was completed.

Photos courtesy of Colombe Clier / Centre des monuments nationaux of the Mont-Saint-Michel Abbey, abbey church, and towering windows in the chancel.

They rebuilt the site and sought to resurrect the monastic life as well as the pilgrimage routes through it.

THE ABBEY SINCE THE REVOLUTION

Mont-Saint-Michel, located on the border between Normandy and Brittany, served as both a point of passage and a fortification for the Duchy of Normandy over its long history. Beginning in the fourteenth century, the recurrent battles of the Hundred Years War between France and England necessitated the construction of new, formidable defenses. It took over 30 years for the Mount, which was guarded by a small band of knights loyal to the King of France and secured by a wall flanked by many defensive towers, to fight off invasions by the English army.

The Mount, abandoned by its administrative abbots in the 17th and 18th centuries, lost its significance in both military and religious connotations during this time period, and it was eventually abandoned entirely.

As a result of the Congregation of Saint-reformation Maur’s in 1622, a new religious order was created in Saint-Maur.

Their efforts included redeveloping the property and attempting to reestablish the monastic life and pilgrimages. It was also up to these monks to deal with the influx of convicts who had been sentenced to jail without trial, since the Abbey had become a sort of “Bastille on the Sea.”

The story continues.

The Abbey of Mont-Saint-thirteen Michel’s centuries of history, as well as its position on an island, present a perpetual conservation and repair challenge. Beyond the ongoing maintenance required for such a heavily visited and exposed to the elements site, the Centre des monuments nationaux undertakes large-scale restoration programs, in which more than 20 million euros have been invested since 2007 to bring it back to its former glory. As a result, the Abbey is undergoing continual construction under the supervision of the Chief Architect of Historical Monuments.

Internal renovations at the Abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel: the chaplaincy Featured images courtesy of Colombe Clier / Centre des monuments nationaux Throughout the year, the numerous cultural events organized by the Centre des monuments nationaux contribute to a rise in the number of visitors to a monument whose access circumstances have been completely modified, particularly in the chapel and the cellar.

Take pleasure in your visit!

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2022 Tips on Visiting Le Mont St Michel in Normandy, France

The island abbey of Mont St Michel is one of the most popular attractions in France’s Normandy and Brittany regions, and it should not be missed. The abbey, walls, and old town are all historical and cultural gems, but stay away from the various tourist traps and eateries that dot the landscape. Mont St Michel is one of the most attractive historical sites in France, and it is well worth a visit. The monastery of Mont St Michel, which dates back to the Middle Ages, is perched on top of a rocky island near the shores of Normandy and Brittany.

  • It is unquestionably worthwhile to see the Romanesque-Gothic abbey complex; nonetheless, a majority of other museums on the island are of little genuine interest.
  • Hiking around the island on the mudflats is also highly popular, and it offers spectacular views of the surrounding area.
  • Purchase your tickets for the abbey in advance from Tiqets to avoid standing in line.
  • Note: Beginning in 2022, prepaid tickets with time-slot entrance timings will be required for visitors to the Abbey of Mont St Michel to be admitted.
  • Tickets are not available for purchase during periods in which the monument is required to stay closed until a reopening date has been announced by the French government.

There are certain modes of transportation that are only accessible during peak hours – an organized tour is a wonderful day-trip option from Paris, for example.

Visiting Mont St Michel in Basse Normandie

In the English Channel, off the coast of Normandy and Brittany, is the little island of Mont St Michel, which is most known for its beautiful Romanesque-Gothic monastic structures. Every year, over 2.5 million visitors travel to Mont St Michel, with almost half of them visiting the abbey complex as well. A single steep road climbs up through the little settlement to the abbey complex at the summit of Mont St Michel once you have passed through the admittance gates (which are free; there is no admission price here).

A few minor museums and attractions are scarcely worth the time it takes to see them.

The busy Grand Rue may be avoided by ascending to the abbey through the walkways on the ramparts, which provide breathtaking views of the city below.

Visiting the Abbey of Mont St Michel

Located off the coasts of Normandy and Brittany, Mont St Michel is a tiny island that is most known for its beautiful Romanesque-Gothic monastic structures. Every year, over 2.5 million visitors come to Mont St Michel, with approximately half of these visitors also visiting the abbey complex. A single steep road climbs up through the little settlement to the abbey complex at the summit of Mont St Michel once you have passed through the admittance gates (which are free; there is no admission charge on this island).

Visiting a few tiny museums and attractions is a waste of time.

It is possible to bypass the congested Grand Rue by ascending to the abbey through the ramparts’ pathways, which provide spectacular views.

  • The west terrace, which offers breathtaking views of the bay
  • The 1000-year-old Romanesque abbey church, erected 80 meters above sea level and with a High Gothic chancel from the fourteenth century
  • With light double-row pillars and the most spectacular vistas, the cloisters are a sight to behold. It is known as the Merveille (marvel) because it is a magnificent thirteenth-century three-level building in two blocks that was designed to assist maintain the weight of the massive church perched atop a rocky outcrop.
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The massive statue of the archangel Saint Michel, which crowns the church’s 32-meter-high spire, may be seen from a long distance away. At the end of the nineteenth century, a statue was erected in his honor. During the Hundred Years War, the fortified fortress of Mont St Michel was notable for its resistance to the English. The abbey was used as a jail during the French Revolution and remained in that capacity until 1863. Because of its historical significance, Mont St Michel has been designated as a national monument since 1874, and it was added to the UNESCO World Cultural Heritage List in 1979.

Opening Hours and Admission Tickets for Mont St Michel Abbey

You can see a long distance away the massive statue of the archangel Saint Michel that crowns the church’s spire, which stands 32 meters high. At the end of the nineteenth century, a statue was erected in its place. During the Hundred Years War, the fortified fortress of Mont St Michel was a prominent fortification. From 1789 through 1863, the abbey served as a jail for political prisoners.

It has been a national monument since 1874, and in 1979, it was listed on the UNESCO World Cultural Heritage list as a part of the French cultural heritage.

It has been a national monument since 1874, and in 1979, it was listed on the UNESCO World Cultural Heritage list as a part of the French cultural heritage.

Tips on Visiting Mont St Michel

With 2.5 million people each year, it is reasonable to expect long lines on most days. It is generally recommended to avoid visiting Mont St Michel during the summer, during school vacations, and during weekends, particularly long weekends. The months of November, early December, late January, February, and March are the months with the lowest visitor counts. If you can’t avoid arriving late in the afternoon (after approximately 3 p.m.) or early in the morning during busy seasons, it’s best to arrive late in the afternoon (after around 3 p.m.) or early in the morning, but lineups can form as early as 30 minutes before opening time during the summer.

  1. Prices on the island are marked up for tourists, and restaurants have little motivation to deliver high-quality food or service if they don’t get repeat business from them.
  2. Although it is common to go around the island on the mudflats, it is recommended that you do so with a guide since the swift and extremely hazardous tides of the Bayeux have previously been documented in the Bayeux tapestry.
  3. There are no lockers or left-luggage facilities available at Mont St Michel or in the parking lot at the present time.
  4. On the mainland, free baggage lockers are accessible at the tourist information center and in the parking lots where you park your car.
  5. It is no longer feasible to get all the way to Mont St Michel by car or on foot.
  6. For additional information, please see Transportation to Mont St Michel.

Mont Saint Michel – Wikitravel

Mont Saint Michel(often writtenMont St Michel, with other variations) is a smallUNESCO World Heritage sitelocated on an island just off the coast of the region ofLower Normandyin northernFrance. The island is best known as the site of the spectacular and well-preserved Norman Benedictine Abbey of St Michel at the peak of the rocky island, surrounded by the winding streets and convoluted architecture of the medieval town.

Understand

Mont Saint Michel was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1979 after being nominated by the French government.

History

Taking in the view of Mont Saint Michel from the causeway parking lot It was looted and destroyed by the Franks, thereby bringing an end to the trans-channel culture that had existed since the Romans left in AD 460. It was known as “mons tumba” before the first monastic monastery was built on the island, which was constructed in the 8th century. During a visit to St. Aubert, bishop of Avranches, in 708 according to tradition, the Archangel Michael directed him to construct a church on the rocky islet.

  • The skull of the saint, complete with a hole, may be found at the St Gervais churche in Avranches.
  • The following phrase occurs on the Bayeux Tapestry, which portrays the Norman conquest of England in 1066: During a fight with Conan II, Duke of Brittany, Harold saves Norman knights from being swallowed by quicksand in the tidal flats, where they were trapped.
  • In 1065, the monastic community of Mont-Saint-Michel lent its support to Duke William of Normandy in his bid for the crown of England, a claim that was later rejected.
  • During the Hundred Years’ War, the English launched many attacks on the island, but were ultimately unsuccessful owing to the reinforced defences of the abbey.
  • When Louis XI of France established the Order of Saint Michael in 1469, he planned for the abbey church of Mont Saint-Michel to serve as the Order’s chapel.
  • A large number of daughter foundations, like St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall, benefited from the abbey’s riches and power.
  • Following its closure, the monastery was repurposed into a jail, with the intended purpose of housing ecclesiastical opponents of the republican regime.
  • It was only in 1863 that the jail was eventually closed, and it was only in 1874 that the mount was designated as a historic monument.

The Mont-Saint-Michel and its harbor were inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage Sites list in 1979, and it was selected based on criteria such as cultural, historical, and architectural value, as well as the beauty of both man-made structures and natural landscapes.

Get in

WARNING:Attempting to reach Mont Saint-Michel by any other route than the footbridge can be dangerous. It is not unheard of for tourists to drown after being cut off by the tide, and the deep mud and quicksand surrounding the island can be treacherous. If you do decide to attempt the crossing, take an experienced guide and check the tide tables. In addition, do not attempt the crossing when the barrage on the Couesnon River is discharging water.

By car

When it comes to visiting Mont Saint Michel, driving is undoubtedly the most cost-effective and convenient option. However, the lines to enter the car park are sometimes quite lengthy, and parking fees are expensive. The Mont Saint Michel is only a short drive from the A84 Caen-Rennes highway in the north of France. Driving from Caen down the A84 south-west via Avranches to the exit for Pontorson is a must while visiting the Normandy area. The exit is shortly before Avranches if you are coming from Brittany or Rennes.

The parking parks are enormous and never seem to full up, although they are a considerable walk (over a mile) from the Mont itself, and a free shuttle service is provided there as well.

The ticket machines are placed in the rear of the information center, near where the shuttle buses pick up and drop off passengers.

By public transport

Although there are no direct rail services between Paris and Mont St Michel, it is feasible to go by train to Pontorson and then take a bus to finish the final part of the journey to the Mont St Michel. The most convenient method is to take the TGV from Gare Montparnasse to Rennes, from which a bus operated by “Keolis Emeraude (ex Courriers Bretons)” (tel. 02-99-19-70-70,;) will take you to the island in 90 minutes (there are 4 departures from Rennes per day, most departures are timed to match to the arrival of the TGV in Rennes but it is always better to check the timing for last minute changes).

The bus costs €15 one-way, with a 25 percent discount for those under the age of 25 or above the age of 60, and it is free for children under the age of twelve.

During off-season Sundays, the Rennes connection is frequently unavailable; instead, take the TGV to Dol-de-Bretagne (which is listed by RailEurope as Dol, France), then the Keolis bus to Mont Saint Michel, which costs €6.60 (on October 13) for adults, with a 25% discount for those under 25 and over 60, and with no charge for children under 12.

  • You can also request that the driver make a pit stop at the accommodation before arriving at Mont St Michel.
  • Expect to be stuck in traffic on the way out as well, because there is only one route coming into and out of the site.
  • If you are on a day trip from Paris, you may face the danger of missing your return train to Gare Montparnasse as a result of this.
  • Alternatively, you may take a TGV train to the Pontorson-Mont St Michel train station (up to four trains per day), which will make a pit stop in Rennes.

Michel from the Pontorson railway station will take you no more than 15 minutes. (Because it is approximately 10 kilometers, this time estimate does not include walking time.) Buses run multiple times a day, depending on demand. The Pontorson railway station has a timetable that you may check out.

By bike

Pedal bicycle parking is available at no charge, and the journey from Pontorson to the Mount is not very challenging.

Get around

The causeway and main entrance to Mont St Michel are shown on this map, which is to the right. The only method to go around Mont St Michel is on foot, and there are only two entrances to the fortified city from the outside. ThePorte de l’Avancée, the main gate at the end of the causeway, leads directly to theGrande Rue, which is jam-packed with souvenir stores and visitors. TheGrande Rue is a pedestrian-only street that runs parallel to the causeway. Escape directly up the stairwell to the ramparts, which are a little less crowded and have excellent views of the mudflats.

All three paths come together at the Abbey, which is located at the summit of the island.

See

  • The causeway and major entrance to Mont St Michel are shown on the right side of the map. All visitors to Mont St Michel must walk around the outside of the fortified city, which has two entrances. The Gran Grande Rue lies just across the street from the Porte de l’Avancée (Main Gate), which is jam-packed with souvenir stores and visitors. The Porte de l’Avancée (Main Gate) is located at the end of the causeway. You may escape up the stairwell and onto the ramparts, which are a little less crowded and have excellent views of the mudflats and surrounding area. On the way up, choose the less-traveled Porte Eschaugette, which is located to one’s left of the main gate. The Abbey, located at the summit of the island, is the meeting point when all three paths converge.

The Carolingian church known as Chapelle Notre-Dame-sous-Terre (Our Lady subterranean) was built in 966 by the first Benedictine monks on the site of the oratory established by Saint-Aubert in the early VIIIth century. The chapel was dedicated to Our Lady beneath.

Eat

The streets leading up to the Mont Saint Michel are lined with a variety of creperies.

On the Mont

The streets leading up to the Mont Saint Michel are lined with a variety of creperie options.

  • Du Guesclin is located on the ramparts with excellent views of the Mediterranean. In 2018, the Themenu touristique (tourist menu), which includes oysters, omelets, and lamb, starts at €20.90, which appears to be quite reasonable by Mont St Michel standards.
  • La Mere Poulard is located just in front of the entryway. They are world-renowned for their omelette. They prepare it directly in front of the restaurant’s window, using unusual ingredients and cooking it right in front of the glass. It is important to make reservations ahead of time because the restaurant is frequently packed. Aside from that, they only serve their world-famous omelette at specific times of the day, so be sure to make your reservations at the appropriate time if you plan to have an omelette. Expect to spend more than €30 for the privilege of using the service.

On the mainland

Located along the road leading up to the Mont is a small area of stores, restaurants, and supermarkets. Although they are not inexpensive, they are more reasonable in comparison to purchasing groceries on the island itself. There is also (limited) parking available on-site.

Drink

On this famous island, there are several prominent drinking establishments, many of which serve cocktails.

Sleep

Mont Saint Michel is home to a variety of tiny hotels that are scattered around the island’s municipality. The island is accessible by daytrip fromRennesorSaint-Maloinstead, which is located on the mainland opposite the island and in the neighboring town ofPontorson. A range of considerably bigger hotels is available on the mainland opposite the island and in the nearby town ofPontorson. Motor homes are permitted to park in the parking lot overnight as part of the usual parking cost.

  • Adress: La Chevallerie BB, Chalandrey 50540 (Near Ducey (5Km)), +00 33 (0)2 33 60 40 97, Chalandrey 50540 (Near Ducey (5Km) (),. Check-in is at 16.00 and check-out is at 11.00. No less than 21€50/night for two adults at a B&B 20 minutes from Le Mont St Michel, where you may rest in calm countryside elegance. edit
  • It is possible to reach La Chevallerie BB via phone at +00 33 (0)2 33 60 40 97 in Chalandrey (Near Ducey) or by email at [email protected] (),. 16.00 h check-in, 11.00 h checkout No less than 21€50/night for 2 adults at a B&B 20 minutes from Le Mont St Michel, where you may rest in calm countryside elegance. edit

Camping

  • Camping Haliotison the D30 going towards ‘Saint James’ or the A84 is a three-star camping park in Pontorson that may be reached by e-mail at: Call 0233681159. Fax 0233589536
  • Tel: 0233681159. Servon is located around 12 kilometers from Avranches and approximately 20 kilometers from the montSAINT GREGOIRE. The campground is a two-star establishment with 93 spaces
  • The town adjacent has no stores (although does have a few of eateries). Phone: 0233602603
  • Fax: 0233606865
  • E-mail:. A very lovely five-star camping facility in Granville, entitled Camping Les îles, is located in the Yelloh Village. Choose from a variety of luxurious accommodations offered on this campground in Normandy’s Normandy region. E-mail:. Phone: +33 (0)2 33 49 06 94
  • Fax: +33 (0)2 33 49 06 94

Cope

Because of the Mont’s popularity as a tourist destination, it may get quite crowded, particularly during the summer months. Because of the high stairs leading up to the Abbey, visitors who are feeling poorly may choose to take a break in one of the many gardens located around the Mont that have lots of seating. Maintain your walking pace if there are people behind you, as blocking their path is likely to anger them. In July and August 2012, the Abbey is open until midnight, with the final admission at 11:00 p.m.

It’s a terrific time to go because the crowds have thinned down significantly in the evening.

Information

The localOffice de Tourisme is located in theCorps de Garde des Bourgeois (Old Guard Room of the Bourgeois), which is to the left of the town gates, and is accessible by public transportation (tel 02-33-60-14-30).

Open every day of the year, with the exception of December 25th and January 1st.

Stay safe

The tidal mudflats surrounding the island contain areas of deep mud and quicksand. Visitors to the island are advised not to attempt crossing the flats by foot. However, if you decide to attempt the crossing, be prepared to take off your shoes and clean up your feet afterwards, as the flats are extremely muddy. The tide here is one of the fastest-rising in Europe, and as such you shouldneverattempt any walks on the sands without checking the tide tables. It is also advisable to only attempt the crossing with a qualified guide.The Mount has several steep staircases, sheer drops, and uneven ground. Keep your children under close watch and ensure that you pay due attention at all times.This is ausablearticle.It has information for getting in as well as some complete entries for restaurants and hotels.An adventurous person could use this article, but pleaseplunge forwardandhelp it grow!

How To Visit Mont Saint-Michel: France’s Most Picturesque UNESCO World Heritage Site

Despite the fact that it is one of the most popular tourist sites in France, Mont Saint-Michel continues to be a mystery to non-French speakers. On Instagram (of all places), I first saw the island and its unique tidal reflection, and I was immediately smitten with the idea of visiting this mysterious UNESCO World Heritage Site. I couldn’t quite figure out how to execute it exactly, and that was my only concern. Almost every one of my pals who’d been there either went on guided tours or received less-than-helpful advise on how to get about in a manual vehicle and on the fly.

  1. My fiancé and I rented an automatic car from HertzEurope, which was conveniently located at Gare De Lyon on the outskirts of Paris, which meant that we didn’t have to do much driving in the city (a helpful tip for travelers!
  2. It is possible to reach Mont Saint-Michel via automobile (it is around a four-hour drive from Paris, but traffic can be heavy), charter bus, or guided trip.
  3. Tourists are not permitted to drive directly onto the Mont, but there is easily accessible parking for 11.70 € for 24 hours, and a free shuttle (from 7:30 a.m.
  4. What to Look Out For Mostly, you’re here to view theMont Saint-Michel Abbey, which has been described as a “gravity-defying” monastic retreat that dates back more than 1000 years.
  5. The mountain’s steep lawns are ideal for walking and picnicking; there are also gift shops and rest areas to visit after the Abbey.
  6. In the original location of La Mere Poulard, which is positioned at the entrance to the property, the distinctive omelettes are served.
  7. What to buyCookies, of course!

The cookies, which are available in a variety of sizes in souvenir tins as well as individually wrapped parcels to consume on the spot, are crisp, sweet, and, well, buttery.

Hotel accommodations are available on the island, but unless you’re arriving late at night and want to explore the next morning, you shouldn’t make an overnight stay a priority.

This year, we stayed at Château de la Ballue, a centuries-old family castle that has been transformed into a bed & breakfast with a beautiful garden.

This will allow you to get in some extra (convenient) sightseeing before the final leg back to Paris.

High season has ended for the year, and I’ve been informed that unless you enjoy being pushed in more directions than your body naturally moves by frenetic, sweaty masses, this is not the best time of year to travel to the city.

No matter what time of year you come, if you want to see the famous reflection of the castle in the water, check the tide chart and time your visit to coincide with the greatest tides in European history.

Find out about the Mont-Saint-Michel’s fascinating history

The UNESCO-listed Mont-Saint-Michel is a magnificent island capped by a tall medieval monastery that looms dramatically on the horizon and defies some of the highest tides in Europe. It is an unmistakable landmark of the northern French coast. It has been one of Europe’s most important pilgrimage locations for centuries, and now, 2.5 million visitors from all over the world come here each year to pay homage.

Where exactly in France is the Mont-Saint-Michel? How far is it from Paris?

There is frequently dispute as to whether it belongs to Normandy or its neighboring area of Brittany, since it is located in the bay where the two regions combine – yet it is Normandy that has made the first move to assert its ownership. It is located 26 kilometers south-west of Avranches and 330 kilometers west of Paris, and it is part of the Manche department. You may drive there from Paris in 4 hours or take the train from Paris-Montparnasse to Pontorson–Mont-Saint-Michel, followed by a navette (shuttle bus) to the Mount itself, which takes about 30 minutes.

What’s the history of the Mont-Saint-Michel?

The Mount has a long and illustrious history that is said to have begun in 708, when Aubert, Bishop of Avranches, ordered the construction of a shrine on Mont-Tombe in honor of the Archangel Michael. Its creation was in itself a miracle: boats delivered granite from quarries in Chausey, a collection of tiny islets off the Normandy coast, which was then cut into blocks and dragged to the summit of the Mount. Several more majestic monastery structures were constructed to the site during the medieval period, and the main abbey developed into a center of study, drawing some of Europe’s best brains and manuscript illuminators.

  • Sabina Lorkin of Anibas Photography – CRT is the photographer for this piece.
  • The Cloister of the Abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel is a beautiful place to visit.
  • The Benedictines established themselves at the abbey around the 10th century, while a community sprang up under its walls.
  • An impregnable bastion during the Hundred Years War, theMont-Saint-Michelis also an example of military architecture.
  • Following the breakup of the monastic order during the Revolution, the abbey was utilized as a jail until it was decommissioned in 1863.
  • Since then, construction has continued on a regular basis throughout the site.

Since 1979, the Mount has been designated by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization as a World Heritage Site.

How have the tides affected the Mont-Saint-Michel?

The accumulation of silt surrounding the bay was caused by strong tides and human involvement over time, and by 2006, the almost landlocked Mount no longer resembled a true island at all. In the same year, work began on a project to restore the mount’s connection to the sea, which included the construction and operation of a new dam that was supposed to gradually sweep away the silt and sand. The original parking lot at the foot of the rock was removed and relocated to a new location near the bridge on the mainland, and the causeway was built to connect the two locations, restoring the Mount to its actual island designation.

Tessier of the CRT Normandie.

Visiting the Mont-Saint-Michel: what is there to see?

This is a must-see French landmark, and it’s worth allotting enough time to view the museums, hotels, restaurants, and boutiques that are located nearby. In addition to the abbey itself, don’t forget to check out:

  • This museum, which has 250 historical boat models and provides information on the Mont Saint-Michel Maritime Character Restoration project, is located at the Musée de la Mer et de l’Écologie in Mont Saint-Michel. It includes the Musée Historique, which charts 1,000 years of history through its collection of ancient weapons, medieval instruments of torture, Louis XI’s iron cell, and the oubliettes
  • The Logis Tiphaine, which was once the home of Knight Bertrand du Guesclin – 14th-century constable of the armies of the French king – and his wife Tiphaine de Raguenel, who was a famous astrologer who used to predict the fate of

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