How Old Is Saint Nicholas

Saint Nicholas

From c.301 to c.400, the civilization flourished. Myra Frequently Asked Questions

Who is Saint Nicholas?

Known variously as Nicholas of Myra and Nikolas of Bari, (flourished 4th century in Myra, Lycia, Asia Minor; Western feast day December 6; Eastern feast day December 19), St. Nicholas is one of the most popular minor saints commemorated in both the Eastern and Western churches, and is traditionally associated with the festival of Christmas. On the 6th of December, known as St. Nicholas Day, children in many nations receive gifts. He is considered to be one of the patron saints of children and sailors.

Historically, he was born at the ancient Lycian seaside city of Patara and journeyed to Palestine and Egypt as a child, according to legend.

  1. He was imprisoned and most likely tortured during the persecution of Christians by the Roman emperor Diocletian, but he was liberated under the administration ofConstantine the Great after a long period of imprisonment.
  2. After his death, his remains were interred in his church at Myra, where his shrine had become widely renowned by the sixth century.
  3. This move dramatically raised the saint’s fame across Europe, and Bari quickly became one of the most busy pilgrimage destinations on the continent.
  4. The dating of one such relic fragment, a bit of hip bone from a church in the United States, was validated in 2017 by scholars, who determined that it belonged to the 4th century.
  5. Nicholas, bishop of Myra, and the gift-giving Santa Claus of the holiday season.
  6. Nicholas, bishop of Myra, and his life and times.
  7. is a publishing company that publishes encyclopedias.

Nicholas’s reputation for generosity and charity gave birth to traditions of miracles that he performed for the impoverished and destitute, which he shared with his followers.

During the Middle Ages, Nicholas was revered across Europe, and his devotion was widespread.

The emperor Justinian I of Rome erected a church to him in Constantinople (now Istanbul) as early as the 6th century, one of thousands of churches dedicated to him throughout Europe.

Nicholas, c.

Photographs courtesy of PHOTOS.com/Getty Images Plus After the Reformation, devotion to Nicholas faded away in all Protestant nations of Europe, with the exception of Holland, where his legend endures under the name Sinterklaas (St.

Nicholas).

As a result of the country’s English-speaking majority adopting the moniker Santa Claus, Sinterklaas’s legendary narrative of a kind elderly man was combined with old Nordic folktales of a magician who punished misbehaving children and rewarded good children with gifts.

He has been the patron saint of the gift-giving celebration of Christmas ever since.

In the United Kingdom, Santa Claus is referred to as Father Christmas instead of Santa Claus. Those in charge of editing the Encyclopaedia Britannica Melissa Petruzzello was the author of the most recent revision and update to this article.

Who is St. Nicholas?

Known variously as Nicholas of Myra or Nikolas of Bari, (flourished 4th century in Myra, Lycia, Asia Minor; Western feast day December 6; Eastern feast day December 19), St. Nicholas is one of the most popular minor saints commemorated in both the Eastern and Western churches, and is traditionally associated with the festival of Christmas. On the 6th of December, known as St. Nicholas Day, children in various nations are given presents. In addition to children and sailors, he is a patron saint of the sailor community.

  1. Historically, he was born at the ancient Lycian seaside city of Patara and journeyed to Palestine and Egypt as a child, according to the legend.
  2. During the persecution of Christians by the Roman emperor Diocletian, he was imprisoned and presumably tortured, but he was liberated under the administration ofConstantine the Great.
  3. After his death, his remains were interred in his church at Myra, where his shrine had become widely renowned by the sixth century.
  4. This move dramatically expanded the saint’s fame across Europe, and Bari quickly became one of the most busy pilgrimage destinations on the continent.
  5. The dating of one such relic fragment, a bit of hip bone from a church in the United States, was validated in 2017 by experts, who determined that it belonged to the fourth century.
  6. Nicholas, bishop of Myra, and the gift-giving Santa Claus of the holiday season.
  7. Nicholas, bishop of Myra, who lived in the ancient world.

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As a result of Nicholas’s reputation for generosity and kindness, stories of miracles that he did for the poor and unfortunate have grown up around him.

Devotion to Saint Nicholas spread throughout Europe throughout the Middle Ages.

The emperor Justinian I of Rome erected a church to him in Constantinople (now Istanbul), which was the first of thousands of churches dedicated to him throughout Europe.

Nicholas (c.

Saving Myra from Famine is a detail from one of the panels.

Nicholas).

As a result of the country’s English-speaking majority adopting the moniker Santa Claus, Sinterklaas’s legendary narrative of a kind elderly man was combined with old Nordic folktales of a magician who punished misbehaving children while rewarding good children with gifts.

He has been the patron saint of the gift-giving celebration of Christmas ever since.

Santa Claus is referred to as Father Christmas in the United Kingdom. In the Encyclopaedia Britannica, the editors write about: Melissa Petruzzello has made the most recent revisions and additions to this page.

Saint Nicholas

St. Nicholas, also known as Nicholas of BariorNicholas of Myra, (flourished 4th century, Myra, Lycia, Asia Minor; Western feast day December 6; Eastern feast day December 19), is one of the most popular minor saints commemorated in both the Eastern and Western churches, and is now traditionally associated with the festival of Christmas. Many nations celebrate St. Nicholas Day on December 6, and children are given presents on this day. He is one of the patron saints of children and seafarers, among other things.

  • Tradition has it that he was born in the ancient Lycian seaside city of Patara and journeyed to Palestine and Egypt as a child.
  • He was imprisoned and presumably tortured by the Roman emperor Diocletian during the persecution of Christians, but he was liberated under the administration ofConstantine the Great.
  • He was buried in his church at Myra, and by the 6th century, his shrine had become well-known across the region.
  • Nicholas’s remains are still housed in the basilica ofSan Nicola at Bari, which dates back to the 11th century, while portions have been taken by churches all across the world.
  • Find out how to distinguish between the genuine St.
  • Learn about the historical St.
  • Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc.
  • See all of the videos related to this topic.
  • He was rumored to have supplied gold wedding dowries to three girls who would otherwise have been driven into prostitution due to poverty, and to have brought back to life three children who had been hacked up by a butcher and placed in a tub of brine.
  • Eventually, he was designated as the patron saint of Russia and Greece, as well as philanthropic fraternities and guilds; children, sailors, unmarried females, merchants, and pawnbrokers; and places such as Fribourg in Switzerland and Moscow, among others.

Nicholas’s miracles were a popular subject for medieval artists and liturgical plays, and his traditional feast day was the occasion for the ceremonies of theBoy Bishop, a widespread European custom in which a boy was elected bishop and reigned until Holy Innocents’ Day (December 28).Ambrogio Lorenzetti: Saving Myra from Famine Saving Myra from Famine, a detail of a panel from Ambrogio Lorenzetti’s tempera on wood painting Four Stories from the Life of St.

  1. Nicholas, c.
  2. PHOTOS.com/Getty Images Plus is a stock photography website.
  3. Nicholas).
  4. When the English-speaking majority of the Netherlands renamed Sinterklaas Santa Claus, his mythology of a friendly old man was combined with old Nordic folktales of a magician who punished mischievous children and rewarded good ones with gifts.
  5. He has been the patron of the gift-giving celebration of Christmas ever since.
  6. Nicholas was converted into a comparable beneficent gift-giving character in the Netherlands, Belgium, and other northern European nations in a variety of guises.

Father Christmas is the name given to Santa Claus in the United Kingdom. The Encyclopaedia Britannica’s Editors Melissa Petruzzello has made the most current revisions and updates to this page.

Who Was Saint Nicholas?

St. Nicholas, also known as Nicholas of BariorNicholas of Myra, (flourished 4th century, Myra, Lycia, Asia Minor; Western feast day December 6; Eastern feast day December 19), is one of the most popular minor saints commemorated in both the Eastern and Western churches, and is now traditionally associated with the festival ofChristmas. On December 6, also known as St. Nicholas Day, children throughout the world receive presents. He is regarded as one of the patron saints of children and sailors.

  • According to legend, he was born in the ancient Lycian seaside city of Patara and journeyed to Palestine and Egypt as a child.
  • He was imprisoned and most likely tortured during the persecution of Christians by the Roman emperor Diocletian, but he was liberated under the administration ofConstantine the Great.
  • He was buried in his church at Myra, and by the 6th century, his shrine had become well-known across the region.
  • This move dramatically expanded the saint’s reputation across Europe, and Bari quickly became one of the most visited pilgrimage destinations in the world.
  • In 2017, researchers determined the age of one such relicfragment, a bit of hip bone from a church in the United States, and determined it to be from the 4th century.
  • Nicholas, bishop of Myra, and the gift-giving Santa Claus of the holidays.
  • Nicholas, bishop of Myra.
  • View all of the videos associated with this topic.
  • He was rumored to have supplied gold wedding dowries to three females who would otherwise have been pushed into prostitution by poverty, as well as to have brought back to life three children who had been hacked up by a butcher and placed in a tub of brine.
  • He was designated as the patron saint of Russia and Greece, as well as philanthropic fraternities and guilds, children, sailors, unmarried females, merchants, and pawnbrokers, as well as places such as Fribourg, Switzerland, and Moscow.

Nicholas’s miracles were a popular subject for medieval artists and liturgical plays, and his traditional feast day served as the occasion for the ceremonies of theBoy Bishop, a widespread European custom in which a boy was elected bishop and reigned until Holy Innocents’ Day (December 28).Ambrogio Lorenzetti: Saving Myra from Famine Saving Myra from Famine, a detail from a panel from Four Stories from the Life of St.

  1. Nicholas, tempera on wood by Ambrogio Lorenzetti, c.
  2. PHOTOS.com/Getty Images Plus After the Reformation, devotion to Nicholas faded away in all Protestant nations of Europe, with the exception of Holland, where his legend endures as Sinterklaas (a Dutch variant of the nameSt.
  3. Dutch immigrants brought this practice with them to New Amsterdam (now New York City) in the American colonies during the 17th century.
  4. The resultant image of Santa Claus in the United States was consolidated in the nineteenth century, and he has remained the patron saint of the gift-giving celebration of Christmas ever since.
  5. Nicholas was converted into a comparable beneficent gift-giving figure in the Netherlands, Belgium, and other northern European nations under various guises.

In the United Kingdom, Santa Claus is referred to as Father Christmas. The Editors of the Encyclopaedia Britannica Melissa Petruzzello has most recently amended and updated this article.

Early Life

Known variously as Nicholas of Myra and Nikolas of Bari, (flourished 4th century in Myra, Lycia, Asia Minor; Western feast day December 6; Eastern feast day December 19), St. Nicholas is one of the most popular minor saints commemorated in both the Eastern and Western churches, and is traditionally associated with the festival of Christmas. On the 6th of December, known as St. Nicholas Day, children in many nations receive gifts. He is considered to be one of the patron saints of children and sailors.

  1. Historically, he was born at the ancient Lycian seaside city of Patara and journeyed to Palestine and Egypt as a child, according to legend.
  2. He was imprisoned and most likely tortured during the persecution of Christians by the Roman emperor Diocletian, but he was liberated under the administration ofConstantine the Great after a long period of imprisonment.
  3. After his death, his remains were interred in his church at Myra, where his shrine had become widely renowned by the sixth century.
  4. This move dramatically raised the saint’s fame across Europe, and Bari quickly became one of the most busy pilgrimage destinations on the continent.
  5. The dating of one such relic fragment, a bit of hip bone from a church in the United States, was validated in 2017 by scholars, who determined that it belonged to the 4th century.
  6. Nicholas, bishop of Myra, and the gift-giving Santa Claus of the holiday season.
  7. Nicholas, bishop of Myra, and his life and times.
You might be interested:  How Did Saint Nicholas Die

is a publishing company that publishes encyclopedias.

Nicholas’s reputation for generosity and charity gave birth to traditions of miracles that he performed for the impoverished and destitute, which he shared with his followers.

During the Middle Ages, Nicholas was revered across Europe, and his devotion was widespread.

The emperor Justinian I of Rome erected a church to him in Constantinople (now Istanbul) as early as the 6th century, one of thousands of churches dedicated to him throughout Europe.

Nicholas, c.

Photographs courtesy of PHOTOS.com/Getty Images Plus After the Reformation, devotion to Nicholas faded away in all Protestant nations of Europe, with the exception of Holland, where his legend endures under the name Sinterklaas (St.

Nicholas).

As a result of the country’s English-speaking majority adopting the moniker Santa Claus, Sinterklaas’s legendary narrative of a kind elderly man was combined with old Nordic folktales of a magician who punished misbehaving children and rewarded good children with gifts.

He has been the patron saint of the gift-giving celebration of Christmas ever since.

In the United Kingdom, Santa Claus is referred to as Father Christmas instead of Santa Claus. Those in charge of editing the Encyclopaedia Britannica Melissa Petruzzello was the author of the most recent revision and update to this article.

Reputation

Saint Nicholas of Myra is the subject of several stories and folklore. One narrative talks of him assisting three impoverished sisters. Their father did not have enough money to pay their dowries and contemplated selling them into slavery in order to supplement his income. A total of three times, Saint Nicholas made a surprise visit to their home at night and left a bag of money at the door. The money was used by the guy to arrange for one of his daughters to marry. The guy saw Saint Nicholas on his third visit and expressed his gratitude to him for his generosity.

Death and Legacy

Saint Nicholas is supposed to have died on December 6, 343 according to a number of different accounts. His miracles and charitable work for the poor expanded throughout the world as word of his miracles and charitable work for the destitute spread. He gained notoriety as a defender of children and seafarers, and he was also linked with the distribution of gifts. At least until the Reformation in the 1500s, he was a popular saint throughout Europe. The Reformation was a theological movement that resulted in the foundation of Protestantism, which rejected the practice of honoring religious figures such as saints.

  • The Dutch continued to commemorate the feast of Saint Nicholas, which took place on December 6.
  • They would find the presents that Saint Nicholas had left for them when they woke up the next morning.
  • While in America, Saint Nicholas underwent several transformations: Sinterklaas became Santa Claus, and instead of presenting presents on December 6, he became an integral part of the Christmas season.
  • Santa Claus, as seen in an 1881 painting by cartoonist Thomas Nast, contributed to the tradition of Saint Nicholas by donning a red outfit with white fur trim.
  • In 2017, a team from the University of Oxford radiocarbon tested a piece of a pelvic bone that was thought to have belonged to Saint Nicholas.
  • The results of the test indicated that the bone fragment, which belonged to an American priest, belonged to the saint’s time period.

When the bone was identified, archaeologists wanted to compare it to other bones that had been attributed to Saint Nicholas, including those that had been held in a crypt at Bari, Italy, since the 11th century.

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Who Was St. Nicholas?

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The History of How St. Nicholas Became Santa Claus

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Jolly Old St. Nicholas?

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From bishop to gift giver

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Coming to America

In the Netherlands, children and families just refused to give up the tradition of St. Nicholas bringing gifts. They transported the tale of Sinterklaas with them to the New World colonies, where the legends of the hairy and terrifying Germanic gift bringers persisted as well. However, Christmas in early America was very different from the present celebration. In New England, the event was avoided, and in other parts of the country, it had taken on the appearance of the pagan Saturnalia that had formerly held the same spot on the calendar.

  1. And there was no specific, mystical gift-giver who appeared.” Then, during the first decades of the nineteenth century, everything changed owing to a group of poets and authors who worked hard to make Christmas a family celebration—by renewing and rebuilding the figure of St.
  2. Nickerbocker’s History of New York, written by Washington Irving in 1809, depicted a pipe-smoking Nicholas floating above the roofs in a flying wagon, giving presents to good girls and boys and switching presents with bad ones.
  3. With this apparition, “Santa Claus” has made his public debut, according to Bowler.
  4. Nicholas’ supernatural gift-giving, which has been stripped of all religious qualities.
  5. Originally written for his six children, Clement Clarke Moore’s “A Visit From St.
  6. Moore had no intention of contributing to the burgeoning Santa Claus myth.
  7. “It went viral,” Bowler said of the video.
  8. The photograph, which Bowler described as “absolutely the likeness of George Washington riding on a broomstick,” was taken by him.
  9. Santa’s cheery, chubby, grandfatherly look was mostly conceived by Thomas Nast, the renowned political cartoonist of an era in which there were many of them.

According to Bowler, “He’s done an excellent job of taming these characters from the late medieval period that were like something out of a Grimm’s Fairy Tale.”

The Santa problem

When it came to giving up St. Nicholas as a gift-giver in the Netherlands, children and families were adamant. In the New World colonies, they brought Sinterklaas with them, and the traditions of the hairy and terrifying Germanic gift bringers persisted to this day. In contrast to today’s Christmas, Christmas in early America was a quite different occasion. Throughout New England, the celebration was derided, and elsewhere it had evolved into something like to Saturnalia, the pagan festival that had formerly held the same spot on the calendar.

  1. “Even in England, it had devolved into this state of affairs.
  2. Nicholas—by restoring the tradition of giving.
  3. When an anonymous illustrated poem entitled “The Children’s Friend” was published in 1821, it went a long way toward establishing the contemporary Santa Claus and linking him with the holiday season.
  4. Nicholas’ supernatural gift-giving, which has been stripped of any religious qualities.
  5. It was for his six children that Clement Clarke Moore penned “A Visit From St.
  6. He had no idea of contributing to the burgeoning Santa Claus craze at the time.
  7. As Bowler put it, “It went viral.” Although the poem is well known, it still leaves plenty to the imagination, and Santa appeared in a number of varied outfits, sizes ranging from small to huge, and disguises throughout the nineteenth century.
  8. “It wasn’t until the late nineteenth century,” he said, that the picture of Santa became established as an adult clothed in red with white fur trim, traveling forth from the North Pole on a reindeer-drawn sleigh, and keeping an eye on children’s behavior.
  9. However, Nast “left him half-sized and in what I believe to be very terrible long johns,” Bowler continued.

“What he’s done is very much tame these Grimm’s Fairy Tales-type figures from the late medieval period,” Bowler remarked of the author’s accomplishment.

How Old Is Santa Claus? Here’s Everything You Wanted to Know

So many things to like about Christmas—baking Christmas cookies, hanging stockings, singing Christmas songs, watching Christmas movies, purchasing gifts, and decorating the tree are just a few of the things I enjoy about it. There’s also the jolly old man himself, who goes by the name of Santa Claus. Santa Claus distributes gifts to “good” children all across the world every year, and we all know that he has eight reindeer and is married to Mrs. Claus. But what do we really know about Santa Claus?

What is Santa’s exact age?

Read on for answers to all of your questions regarding Santa Claus’s age, birthdate, how he came to be known as Santa Claus, and where he was born (spoiler alert: it wasn’t at the North Pole!) So get some milk and cookies ready, crank on your favorite Christmas music, and get ready to hear some interesting facts about Santa.

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Exactly how old is Santa?

Currently, Santa Claus is 1,750 years old, according to the blogEmail Santa, as of 2021. As a matter of fact, the origins of Santa Claus can be traced all the way back to a monk named Saint Nicholas, who was born between 260 and 280 A.D. in a hamlet called Patara, which is now a part of modern-day Turkey, and lived during the time of the Roman Empire. Santa Claus has been around for 1,750 years. In the years leading up to the birth of Saint Nicholas as Santa Claus, there were several traditions about him performing deeds of generosity, such as offering financial aid to a family so that they would not be forced to sell their daughters into slavery.

In recognition of these and other famous actions, he earned a reputation as a defender of children and seafaring families.

When is Santa’s birthday?

According to SantaClaus.com, Santa’s birthday is celebrated on March 15. Make a note of it for next year on your calendar! Santa Claus is much older than you may expect! Getty Images courtesy of inhauscreative

How did we go from Saint Nicholas to Santa Claus?

According to TIME, the tale of Saint Nicholas was still being carried about throughout Europe in the 16th and 17th centuries when the publication was published. It was customary in the Netherlands to celebrate St. Nicholas Day by dressing up as the saint and visiting door-to-door, giving children little presents or coal, depending on how good or evil they had been that year. The origins of the tradition of Saint Nicholas in North America, however, are a little of a mystery, according to historians.

Nicholas, commonly known as Santa Claus” in the 1770s, which is the earliest recorded mention to Santa Claus in the United States.

It was because they came from places where St.

Nicholas as eitherSamichlaus orSanti-Chlaus in various dialects of Schweizerdeutsch, or Swiss-German. In any case, it’s simple to understand how the name “Santi-Chlaus” would have evolved into “Santa Claus” through the course of history.

So, how old is Santa’s wife, Mrs. Claus?

Mrs. Claus, according to Email Santa, is only a few years younger than her spouse, according to the website. She has been alive for 1,139 years. After opening your gifts this year, don’t forget to wish her a happy birthday by saying the following words: According to her official website, her birthday is on Christmas Day. This material has been imported from another source. Visiting their website may allow you to access the same stuff in a different format, or it may provide you with even more information than you could get elsewhere.

  • If you’re avoiding shopping malls because of the COVID-19 outbreak, you might want to try hosting a virtual Santa visit for your children this year.
  • Jamie Ballard is a writer who lives in the United Kingdom.
  • She has written for a variety of publications.
  • You may be able to discover further information on this and other related items at the website piano.io.

Awaiting the Arrival of Old St. Nick

When does the holiday season officially begin? The solution these days appears to be “as quickly as feasible,” according to merchants. Even while the weekend after Thanksgiving has traditionally been regarded as the unofficial start of the holiday season, other days have also held this distinction. Every year, December 6 was a particularly memorable day for Pittsburghers of Christian European origin, particularly Germans. Saint Nicholas’ feast day was celebrated on December 6th, and children awakened to discover their shoes or stockings filled with fruits, nuts, chocolate coins, and other sweets, a present from him in honor of the occasion.

  • Nicholas Day” marked the beginning of a month-long period of festivities.
  • Supposedly, Nicholas was a rich young man from Asia Minor who rose through the ranks to become Bishop of Myra, a Mediterranean city in what is now Turkey.
  • After his death, he was held in high regard.
  • As a result, this event became intertwined with other regional customs and expanded throughout Europe, Greece and Asia Minor.
  • Nicholas, also known asSankt Nikolaus in German andSinterklaas in Dutch, is considered to be the forerunner of our current Santa Claus.
  • Nick’s bishop’s cap, which indicates his liturgical roots, is very similar to those of the two figures in question.
  • Nicholas Day cards from the early 1900s.

Nicholas Day were popular in Germany, Austria, France, Belgium, and other European nations during the nineteenth century.

Nicholas Center for allowing us to use their photographs of these cards.

Nicholas Day was brought to the United States by a number of different immigrant communities.

Every year, Pittsburgh joined the likes of Cincinnati, Milwaukee, and St.

Nicholas Day is observed on December 19 every year in Pittsburgh by those of Eastern Orthodox religions.

Nicholas Day in Pittsburgh, a multi-ethnic, industrial city with a rich industrial heritage.

The lines between different traditions become a little blurred at times.

Nicholas Day” by announcing it on the city’s official calendar.

30 and Dec.

The titles “St.

The two figures had actually become increasingly synonymous in American culture since the publication of the poem “A Visit from St.

Nick was simply described as being “all in fur” from head to foot, with no Bishop’s mitre to be found.

In Pittsburgh, in 1928, Santa was accompanied by a genuine reindeer and a few Eskimo helpers as part of the “St.

Despite this, the blending of the names revealed the historical relationship between the two individuals in question.

During the 1920s, the holiday balancing act between ethnic identification and American identity was something that everyone, especially local companies, was thinking about.

There were 8,000 children in 1923, according to the census, and photographs show lines of them marching around an enormous Christmas tree, each of them carrying a bag stuffed with candies and popcorn balls.

Nevertheless, when they returned home and opened those bags of candy and popcorn balls, they discovered that the mill that had shaped their lives had sent a clear message about its holiday aspirations for the next generation: those Christmas popcorn balls were red, white, and blue in color, just like the United States flag.

Kenneth Brooks generously donated this photograph from the Detre Library Archives at the Heinz History Center.

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The story of St. Nicholas and the birth of Christmas

While working on an outside wall of my house recently, I turned on the radio only to listen to folks phone in and speak with the show’s host. One caller expressed his dissatisfaction with the fact that during the Christmas season, people pay more attention to Santa Claus than they do to the birth of Jesus. Using this as evidence, he said that “we” had allowed secularism — and perhaps even paganism — to infiltrate the Christmas custom. The presenter merely listened politely, thanked the caller, and then moved on to the next caller on the line.

  • Santa Claus is based on a historical figure, and the character has been around for a long time.
  • He was born on March 15, 270, at the city of Pataya, in the region of Lycia, which is now part of modern Turkey.
  • Nicholas was the only child of affluent Greek parents who perished in an epidemic when he was a youngster.
  • Having inherited considerable fortune from his parents, Nicholas was raised by his uncle, the Bishop of Patara (also called Nicholas), who prepared him for the priesthood.
  • Because of his outspoken opinions, he was persecuted by the Romans and imprisoned during Diocletian’s reign of terror in the fifth century.
  • The period was often referred to as the “Great Persecution.” In 303, four emperors promulgated a series of dictatorial decrees that effectively abolished whatever legal rights that Christians could have had under Roman law.
  • This persecution was intense, and it was most pronounced in the British colonies, where the Empire had the least amount of influence over the population.

Nicholas was imprisoned for around five years because he refused to worship the Roman gods.

The persecutions came to an end in 313 with the ascension of Constantine to the throne.

When it comes to “Christianizing” the Roman Empire, Constantine is most remembered for renaming all of the Mythraic and so-called “pagan” celebrations so that they could all now be considered as Christian holidays out of necessity.

His invitation to the First Assembly of Nicaea in 325, the renowned council where much of contemporary Catholic theology was established, was extended to him a few years later, and he accepted.

He is the 151st person to attend the meeting, according to the agenda.

This belief was held by Arius of Alexandria, who believed that the Son of God did not always exist, but that he was made by the Father.

According to legend, Nicholas became so enraged at Arius that he began fighting with him, hitting him in the face!

Is it possible that Proto-Santa Claus punched a fellow member of the cloth?

When he returned to his own nation, Nicholas earned a reputation as a charitable bishop.

In my opinion, Nicholas was a person who fully exemplified the teachings of early Christianity, and hence someone in whom the church should take the greatest amount of pride.

He appeared to be modest and didn’t want to be seen giving money to others, so he went about his business in secret.

According to legend, this is the origin of the practice of advising youngsters to go to bed or that Santa would not visit.

Nicholas stuffed some gold inside the stockings that the girls had hung by the fire to dry while they were away.

Additionally, he was well-known for the presents that he provided to newlywed couples during the already well-established Christmas season.

Nicholas was a complicated individual who was a part of the new Catholic tradition that celebrated the birth of Jesus on the already-observed winter solstice, which was a part of the new Catholic tradition.

Nicholas died on December 6, 343 and his death is commemorated as “St.

He was laid to rest in the Cathedral of Myra upon his death.

By the year 450, churches in Greece and Asia Minor were being dedicated to Saint Nicholas as a mark of respect.

By the 1200s, the 6th of December had come to be known as Bishop Nicholas Day in France.

Nicholas!

Nicholas by the Dutch, and this is the most likely way in which the term “Santa Claus” came to be associated with St.

As a result of this transformation, St.

Even the Superman narrative, come to think of it, was adapted from Odin’s tale.

St.

Nicholas-Santa Claus for the world to see.

Today, the figure you see in the mall is a modern condensation of truth and myth, embodying the generosity of one Catholic bishop, elements of the mythology of Odin, and the good will of all others who give presents in his place – even parents.

Visit his website, SchoolofSelf-Reliance.com, for more information on his books and workshops. You may also write to him at PO Box 41834, Eagle Rock, California, 90041.

St. Nicholas, Santa Claus & Father Christmas on whychristmas?com

St. Nicholas was a Bishop who lived in the fourth century at a city named Myra in Asia Minor, and is known as the patron saint of sailors (now calledTurkey). The fact that his parents died while he was young and left him a large sum of money made him a very wealthy guy indeed. He was also a compassionate and kind man who had a reputation for assisting the destitute and delivering covert presents to those in need of assistance. There are various tales about St. Nicholas, yet we have no way of knowing which ones are real or not!

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Nicholas Center (www.stnicholascenter.org) provided this image.

Nicholas recalls the account of how the tradition of hanging stockings to fill with gifts got its start!

(A dowry is an amount of money given to the bridegroom by the bride’s parents on the day of the wedding.) Some countries continue to use this practice to this day.) Nicholas slipped a bag of gold down the chimney and entered the house one night in the middle of the night (this meant that the oldest daughter was then able to be married).

  • This was done with the second daughter a short time later.
  • Nicholas pleaded with the man not to tell anybody about what he had done since he did not want to draw attention to himself.
  • It wasn’t long before word of Nicholas’s presence spread, and anybody who received a hidden present was assumed to have gotten it from him.
  • Not only is St.
  • His assistance to three sailors who were stuck in a terrible storm off the coast of Turkey is recounted in one anecdote (see below).
  • They pleaded with St.
  • At that moment, he appeared in front of them, standing on the deck.
  • St.
  • In 325, St.
  • No one knows exactly when St Nicholas passed away, but it occurred on the 6th of December in either 343 (which appears to be the most likely year), 345, or 352.
  • Currently, the bones are stored at the Church that bears his name in the Italian coastal city of Bari.

In 1066, just before setting sail for England, William the Conqueror prayed to St. Nicholas, pleading for the saint to grant him success in his conquest. The St. Nicholas Center has a wealth of information on St. Nicholas.

How St. Nicholas Became Santa Claus

During the fourth century, at a town called Myra in Asia Minor, there resided a Bishop named St. Nicholas (now calledTurkey). In part, this was due to his parents’ deaths, which left him with an enormous amount of money while he was young. Besides that, he was a generous individual who was well-known for assisting the underprivileged and offering covert presents to those in need. There are various tales about St. Nicholas, yet we have no way of knowing which ones are genuine or false! St. Nicholas Center image courtesy of their website (www.stnicholascenter.org).

  • Nicholas recalls the account of how the tradition of hanging stockings to fill with gifts initially began!
  • (A dowry is an amount of money given to the bridegroom by the bride’s parents on the day of her wedding.) Some countries continue to use this practice to this day.
  • As a result, the bag landed in a stocking that had been hanging by the fire to dry.
  • In the end, desperate to track out the person who had given him the money, the father surreptitiously lurked by the fire every evening until Nicholas accidentally dumped a bag of gold into it.
  • It wasn’t long before word of Nicholas’s presence spread, and everyone who received a hidden present was suspected of having gotten it from him.
  • It is not just children who are blessed by St.
  • His assistance to three sailors who were caught in a storm off the coast of Turkey is described in one narrative.

Saint Nicholas was invoked in their prayer for assistance.

He commanded the water to be quiet, and the storm eventually faded away, allowing them to safely sail their ship into port.

Nicholas was deported from his hometown of Myra and eventually imprisoned; nevertheless, he was liberated during the reign of Emperor Constantine, who was also a Christian.

(where things about Christianity were discussed).

A group of Italian merchant seamen took his bones from Turkey in 1087 and buried them in Italy.

It is still customary for the sailors of Bari to transport St.

St. Nicholas was invoked by William the Conqueror in 1066, just before he sailed off to conquer England. He asked that his invasion proceed well. At the St. Nicholas Center, you may learn a great deal about St Nicholas.

  • St. Nicholas was a Bishop who lived in the fourth century in a city named Myra in Asia Minor, and was known as the patron saint of sailors (now calledTurkey). He was a very wealthy man since his parents died while he was a child and left him a substantial inheritance. He was also a compassionate and kind man who had a reputation for assisting the destitute and offering discreet presents to those in need. There are various tales about St. Nicholas, yet we have no way of knowing which ones are accurate! Source: St. Nicholas Center (The most well-known legend about St. Nicholas recalls the account of how the tradition of hanging stockings to fill with gifts got its start. The story goes as follows:There there was a poor father who had three daughters. Because the dad was so impoverished, he did not have enough money to pay for a dowry, which prevented his daughters from marrying. On the wedding day, the bride’s parents give the husband a dowry, which is an amount of money. This is still the case in several nations today.) Nicholas slipped a bag of gold down the chimney and entered the house one night in secrecy (this meant that the oldest daughter was then able to be married). The bag landed in a stocking that had been hanging by the fire to dry! This was done again with the second daughter later on. Finally, determined to track down the person who had given him the money, the father lurked by the fire every evening until he spotted Nicholas slipping in a bag of gold. In order to avoid attracting unwanted attention, Nicholas urged the guy not to tell anybody about what he had done. However, as soon as the rumor spread, everybody who received a secret present was assumed to have gotten it from Nicholas. Nicholas was canonized as a Saint as a result of his charity. Not only is St. Nicholas the patron saint of children, but he is also the patron saint of mariners. His assistance to three sailors who were stuck in a terrible storm off the coast of Turkey is recounted in one account he told. When they looked around, they saw a furious storm, and all of the men were scared that their ship would drown beneath the enormous waves. They pleaded with St. Nicholas to intervene on their behalf. He appeared out of nowhere on the deck in front of them. He commanded the water to be quiet, and the storm faded away, allowing them to safely navigate their ship to port. St. Nicholas was deported from Myra and then imprisoned by the Emperor Diocletian during the persecution of Christians, but he was liberated during the reign of the later Emperor Constantine, who was also a Christian. In 325, St Nicholas was present at the Council of Nicaea (where things about Christianity were discussed). No one knows for certain when St Nicholas died, although it was on the 6th of December in either 343 (which appears to be the most likely year), 345, or 352. His skeleton was seized from Turkey in 1087 by a group of Italian merchant seamen. The remains are presently housed at the Church dedicated to him in the Italian coastal city of Bari. On the feast day of St. Nicholas (6th December), the sailors of Bari continue to transport his statue from the Cathedral out to sea, in order for him to bless the waters and grant them safe passage throughout the year. In 1066, just before setting sail for England, William the Conqueror prayed to St. Nicholas, pleading with the saint to ensure the success of his conquest. At the St. Nicholas Center, you may learn a great deal about St. Nicholas.

Rudolph was originally introduced to the public in 1939, when he was featured in a book authored by Robert L May for the Montgomery Ward department store chain. Later, in 1948, Rudolph was the subject of a cartoon that was produced, and in 1949, the famous song “Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer” was composed about him. A book named ‘The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus’ was written in 1902 by author L. Frank Baum (who is also known for writing the Wizard of OZ). There is a squad of ten reindeer listed on the page.

  • Other reindeer have been given names in various works of literature, television programs, films, and songs.
  • Who knew that Rudolph and the other reindeer working for Santa could possibly be all female?
  • By Christmas, the majority of male deer have shed their antlers and are conserving their energy in preparation for the growth of a new set in the spring.
  • Some believe that Santa Claus resides at the North Pole in the Arctic Circle.
  • Nobody disputes that he rides through the skies on a sledge drawn by reindeer, that he enters houses through the chimney at night and leaves gifts for children in socks or bags by their beds, in front of the family Christmas tree, or by a fireplace.
  • Nicholas’ Eve, which falls on December 5th.
  • Nicholas stuffing the sack of gold into a stocking on Christmas morning.
  • The world’s largest Christmas stocking measured 51 meters 35 centimeters (168 feet 5.65 inches) in length and 21 meters 63 centimeters (70 feet 11.57 inches) in width (from the heel to the toe).
  • Consider how many gifts you could possibly cram into that space!

Santa Claus and Coca-Cola

Harper’s Weekly published an article about St. Nicholas in January 1863. There’s a Christmas Urban Legend that claims that Coca-Cola created Santa’s red costume and that they may even ‘own’ Santa, according to the legend. This is certainly NOT the case! St Nicholas wore his Bishop’s crimson robes long before coke was developed, and he was the first person to do so. He wore a variety of hues (red, green, blue, and brown fur) during Victorian times and before that, but red was always his favorite!

He was dressed in a ‘Stars and Stripes’ attire for this occasion!

In designing Santa’s appearance, Nast drew inspiration from historical knowledge about Santa, the poem ‘A Visit from St.

Nicholas in January 1881.

From 1900 to 1930, this image of Santa became increasingly prominent, with more painters depicting Santa in his red and white suit throughout this time period.

He took the idea of Nast’s Santa and made him even larger than life and more cheery, replacing the pipe with a glass of Coca-Cola, and so created the renowned Coca-Cola-holding Santa!

Since 1931, Coca-Cola has included Santa Claus in its advertising campaigns.

In 1995, they debuted the ‘Coca-Cola Christmas truck’ as part of the ‘Holidays are coming’ television advertisements. The red truck, decked out in lights and emblazoned with the iconic ‘Coke Santa’ logo on its sides, has become a well-known aspect of recent Christmas history.

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